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4.4 out of 5 stars151
4.4 out of 5 stars
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on 28 May 2015
Interesting look at the empire from a different perceptive. Though he likes to be controversial he often produces interesting and thought provoking books and TV shows and this no exception.
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on 11 June 2016
Stupendous book at a wonderful price
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on 28 April 2014
A good primer for students moving onto undergraduate history studies.
Used by the Open university in its A326 course preparation.
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on 9 February 2013
Enthralling read it on holiday and learnt so much and now understand so much more about England as it is now.
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on 11 February 2016
Bought for an OU course.
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on 10 February 2016
Great read what scope
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on 3 July 2008
There are, however, some serious factual errors. The British empire allowed famines in India that killed millions of people even while food was exported from that country. Preferential tariffs seriously impaired the textile industry in India so that British textile imports to the subcontinent could flourish.

And Ferguson's assertion that Britain willingly sacrificed its empire to preserve democracy at home is pure fantasy. The UK's anti-insurgency campaigns in Kenya and Malaya in the postwar period do not fit the model of noble sacrifice of empire, so he simply ignores these wars.

Ferguson writes well and vividly, but his love of British imperialism impels him to some strange positions. For a thorough critique of this book, see Chalmers Johnson, Nemesis, chapt two.
For a witty, yet scholarly account of British imperialism, see Piers Brendon, The Decline and Fall of the British Empire.
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on 28 September 2014
Brilliant thank you!
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on 25 February 2014
This book beautifully threads key events that shaped Britain from a buccaneer-infested island into becoming the mightiest empire in history. At its zenith, the British empire controlled a quarter of the world's land mass and administrated close to 250 million people on the planet. In due course planted the seeds that led to the fruition of the modern world we come out to see today. Learn more about "the empire on which the sun never sets" by buying this brilliant piece of work! Thank you Niall for writing the book!
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on 3 December 2014
Item as described
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