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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A first - class mystery thriller
The Hound of the Baskervilles is a marvellous example of a British detective mystery. The story keeps you entertained and guessing at every twist and turn and the ending is far from predictable! An enjoyable and well written mystery and a classic Sherlock Holmes case.
Published on 28 Aug. 1999

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3.0 out of 5 stars Just possible
Perhaps a central attraction of The Hound of The Baskervilles is that one mystery in the plot breeds another almost ad infinitum. Dr Mortimer believes that Sir Charles Baskerville's death is due to the curse of the Baskervilles by which successive heirs to its legacy have been snuffed out in untimely fashion across the centuries since the time of Cromwell when after an...
Published on 22 May 2013 by Susanna Deakin


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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 30 Jan. 2015
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G. L. Jeffery (Tacoma, WA USA) - See all my reviews
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Great item and super service. What ore could you ask? Many thanks.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 25 Feb. 2015
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Mrs. E. Smith "Film Buff" (United Kingdom.) - See all my reviews
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Brilliant.
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4.0 out of 5 stars this was a present to my dad who's really liked, 18 Jan. 2015
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Again, this was a present to my dad who's really liked it
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 20 May 2015
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Very good still one of the best books to enjoy reading.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Slightly Complicated in places, you can see the action, 29 Aug. 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles (Penguin Popular Classics) (Paperback)
My first Conan Doyle book that I have read, very pleased. The book had the mystery and suspense that Agatha Christie also produced. The plot is clever and the case is conceiled until the very last moments. Well worth a read. Regard all unusual happenings as a clue and try to piece together the puzzle as cleverly as Holmes does.
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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars One of the weakest of Conan Doyle's plots, 13 Nov. 2010
Whenever I write a negative review of a well-loved book I get criticism from fans along the lines of `have you actually read it?' Perhaps writing reviews of books I haven't read would make some kind of artistic statement but it sounds like too much effort for my essentially lazy self.

So then, here is a book that I have read and don't much care for. I like Sherlock Holmes a lot and Conan Doyle was one of my favourite authors as a kid - in fact I think I've read all his books. But this one, despite being many people's top pick Sherlock Holmes story doesn't do it for me. It's written well enough of course, although Conan Doyle is not a great wordsmith like, say, HG Wells with whom his stories have a lot in common, but the material in my view is just a bit thin. In particular there are two aspects of the story that I don't care for. First Holmes himself disappears for a big chunk of the book so that Watson is left driving the story forward - and he is not an interesting enough character on his own to hold the reader's interest. Nor can he provide any insight since the purpose of Watson is always to draw the wrong conclusions. Secondly, the bad guy effectively gives himself away and although Holmes works out who and why he need not have bothered because events bring the story to a natural conclusion anyway. What the reader is left with therefore is a jolly romp sort of story rather than a satisfying intellectual unpicking of a devilish plot. Of course this is a must read if you are a devoted fan, but in that case why are you reading this review?
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great read, 4 Dec. 2014
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I thoroughly enjoyed it and would re-read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 28 Oct. 2014
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A good read with a good twist at the end
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5.0 out of 5 stars Lovely, 15 July 2014
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Beautiful looking book, excellent gift!!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lemon Entry, My Dear Watson, 12 Oct. 2010
Sherlock Holmes made his debut in "A Study in Scarlet", a novella first published in 1887. He and his sidekick, Doctor John H Watson, appeared in over fifty mysteries together. "The Hound of the Baskervilles" is probably the pair's most famous case, and was inspired by a legend about a ghostly hound that haunted Dartmoor. The story was first serialised in the Strand Magazine, with the final instalment appearing in 1902 - and the complete book first appearing that same year.

Although Holmes will be seen as the book's hero, it's Watson who tells the story. The pair's involvement with case begins with a visit from Dr James Mortimer - although, initially, he has stopped by only for a little advice. Mortimer has travelled up to London from his home on the edge of Dartmoor. Sir Charles Baskerville, an elderly neighbour of Mortimer's, has recently died and the doctor is in town to meet his successor. However, thanks to a family legend, the details of the death have the whole community panicking. Back in the 1700s, the man who ruled Baskerville Hall - Sir Hugo - was anything but a virtuous man. Having kidnapped the daughter of a neighbouring yeoman - she wouldn't come willingly - he wasn't at all pleased when she later escaped and fled across the moors. In true Monty Burns style, he pledges himself to all that was unholy, unleashes the hounds and sets out after her. Unfortunately, things don't quite go according to plan. While a huge ghostly hound joins the hunt and the girl dies of fear and exhaustion, Sir Hugo also dies and the hound feasts on his throat. Holmes, of course, views this as little more than a fairy tale. However, those who live close to Baskerville Hall are worried that the curse of the Baskervilles has returned. Several have seen a huge black hound on the moors, "luminous, ghastly and spectral", while Mortimer himself discovered massive paw-prints close to where Sir Charles' body was found. Unlike Hugo, Sir Charles was very highly thought of by all those who knew him. Dr Mortimer is naturally very concerned for Sir Charles' nephew and heir. Sir Henry, the last surviving Baskerville, will very shortly be arriving in London from Canada.

Naturally, the bad news keeps coming for Sir Henry. He has barely arrived in London when he receives a mysterious letter warning him to keep away from Baskerville Hall, there's a mysterious bearded man is following his every move, an escaped killer is living rough on the moors and (strangely) someone keeps stealing his boots. Not to be put off, Sir Henry decides to return to the ancestral home - though not without Watson. Holmes, initially, is unable to join them - there are a few cases in London needing his immediate attention. However, he does issue Watson with some very clear instructions on how to proceed.

A short and easy read...though not quite as scary or as dramatic as I'd imagined. I'd put this partly down to the 'old fashioned' writing - while it was probably pacey stuff at the time it was written, it's a little stiff and formal by today's standards. I was also a little disappointed with Holmes : while Watson was a likeable character, I couldn't really warm to the great Sherlock. He struck me as an egotistical showman, a little too keen to hog the spotlight. (He practically threw a huff when Mortimer compared him unfavourably to Bertillion). He appeared desperate to deduce everything - whether he needed to or not - so that people could marvel at his incredible intellect. (I also wondered if he was - at least partly - trying to keep Watson in his place). Still, there isn't too much damage done : Holmes goes missing for a stretch, and that gives Watson - who is much more likeable - the limelight.
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The Hound of the Baskervilles (Penguin Popular Classics)
The Hound of the Baskervilles (Penguin Popular Classics) by Arthur Conan Doyle (Paperback - 25 Jan. 2007)
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