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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you are thinking Debra Kerr you will be shocked.
I grew up on the movie so it was quit a shocker to read the book. As stated in the beginning there are no petticoated women in this book. It is a men's adventure written by a man for men. You can not miss the hand of H. Rider Haggard as he has a unique sense of humor that pops up at the strangest times. He may be a little verbose but every word has a use. And as with...
Published on 3 Jun 2006 by bernie

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1.0 out of 5 stars For people who hate literature
Every so often I get the feeling that a good old timey adventure book would be a good thing to read. This is (hopefully) the last time I think this as the results are always dire. Conan Doyle's "The Lost World" was one hell of a struggle. Chesterton's "The Man Who Was Thursday" was dreadful. However, Rider Haggard's "King Solomon's Mines" takes the...
Published on 24 Feb 2010 by Sam Quixote


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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars This was a good book about 100 years ago., 12 Jun 2010
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H. Tee (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: King Solomon's Mines (Penguin Popular Classics) (Paperback)
You will rate this book very highly if you can answer yes to the following questions
1) Do you want to read a good old style rip-roaring adventure?
2) It doesn't matter that the story has irritating implausibilities
3) I needn't care about the characters
4) Knowing the outcome of the story at the start (because the narrator lives to tell the tale) is not important
5) Aspects of out-dated views of native Africans or wildlife welfare are not important
6) Starting a revolution causing thousands of unnecessary deaths so a couple of old colonials can get at some diamonds won't detract my view that "all's well that end's well".

This is not good literature. I suppose one is thrown back to another era perhaps imagining being that poorly travelled Brit/Victorian reading a leather bound 'Wonders of the World' when Gorillas were violent creatures and native Africans thought white people superiors from the sky.

It's a dated Victorian adventure that's passed its sell by date. The saving grace is it is short so you can chalk up another "classic" without much effort. Read it if you must, enjoy it if you can.
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4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than any of the films, 26 Mar 2002
By A Customer
They simply don't write adventure stories like this any more. But that doesn't mean it's offensive to modern sensibilities, like, say, Burroughs or Rohmer or even Kipling: while most colonial-era adventure fiction was pretty racist, Haggard was way ahead of his time. Umbopa is treated (most of the time) as the white men's equal even before they discover his true identity - and there's even a cross-racial love interest, something slightly daring even today. (Admittedly Haggard doesn't demonstrate the courage of his convictions with this one, but remember it was 1885; and film versions much more recently have tended to introduce a white woman.)
His first-hnd knowledge of Africa leaps off the page, as does his enormous respect for the Zulu people (to whom his Kukuanas are closely related). Combined with vivid descriptions, fast-moving action, excellent characterisation, and a chilling pair of villains in King Twala and the witch Gagool, this makes for an excellent novel.
One niggle - I've read two editions of this, and in one it's the sun that's eclipsed while in the other it's the moon. I know it was the sun in the films; but Haggard gives a date - 4 June 1880; now, I don't know about the moon, but the sun had undergone a total eclipse visible in South Africa on 22 January 1879, as Haggard well knew - and they're not exactly common occurrences. What's up?
One other thing - as Haggard himself points out, this is a book for boys, and for the eternal boy in every man. The fairer sex would probably be bored stiff.
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars King Solomon's Mines, 17 Dec 2010
This review is from: King Solomon's Mines (Paperback)
This is the second time I have been let down by Amazon in 5 days. Both my items were for Christmas presents. The annoying thing is that I ordered these things in early November and were promised weeks ago. Jacko
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King Solomon's Mines (Penguin Popular Classics)
King Solomon's Mines (Penguin Popular Classics) by H. Rider Haggard (Paperback - 27 Sep 2007)
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