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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Stuff
A great study aid. The audio is very well done and creates an appropriate atmosphere. Excellent for use in the class - it certainly beats me trying to read it! The notes are also excellent. Very thoughtful and incisive.
Published on 9 Mar 2011 by dean

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Although the overall quality is good and the package represents reasonable value-for-money
Be warned! I purchased this primarily for the audiobook which I assumed would cover the full-text. However, it is slightly abridged: I read the story alongside the audio and large sections were removed. Although the overall quality is good and the package represents reasonable value-for-money, if I had known that the audiobook was not unabridged, I probably wouldn't...
Published 4 months ago by DerbyRob


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Stuff, 9 Mar 2011
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A great study aid. The audio is very well done and creates an appropriate atmosphere. Excellent for use in the class - it certainly beats me trying to read it! The notes are also excellent. Very thoughtful and incisive.
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43 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece and a landmark in fiction, 7 Mar 2004
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This review is from: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Penguin Popular Classics) (Paperback)
The story goes that Robert Louis Stevenson wrote this novel in just two days, whilst sick with a fever. His wife, who was nursing him, read the completed manuscript and deciding it was rubbish - the deranged ramblings of a very ill man - she threw it onto the fire. Not to be deterred, her husband simply rewrote this story - in another two days.
We may be glad of Robert Louis Stevenson's perseverance, as this is a truly astounding novel. At the time it was first published, it was a shocking tale, but whilst modern readers will be familiar with the Jekyll and Hyde concept, they may still be captivated by the quality of the writing and the true horror drawn out in the author's words, which have a sinister quality that the countless film and television versions and variations over the years have failed to match.
This isn't just a horror story - it's a book about appearance and reality, and about our notions of who we are and how we are viewed by others. That's not to mention that old chestnut of good versus evil - but here, played out in two sides of the same person. Stevenson's fascinating ideas are brilliantly executed in this little masterpiece of a novel.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars About the edition..., 18 April 2009
By 
Miss K (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
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This is not a review of the story itself - I think there is enough information out there about that! This review is about the actual edition of the story.

I bought this off Amazon for £1.99 which I thought was a bargain - it IS, but be aware that the text is small and tightly packed onto the page. It is however well printed and perfectly readable as a result. I have seen a cheaper Puffin edition where the headache-inducing text was so cramped on the page that you had to really concentrate to stay on track - very off-putting to say the least!

The Jekyll and Hyde story takes up 50 pages of the 232 pages book and this edition also includes a short introduction, bibliography and some end notes if you are at all interested in these things. Overall I think this is a decent edition - it is a bargain but rest assured the quality is there and the pages are a good thickness and NOT like tissue paper! :)
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Robert Louis Stevenson's classical tale of the "werewolf", 4 Oct 2003
By 
Amazon Customer (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Penguin Popular Classics) (Paperback)
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" is assured a place in the history of horror fiction because it the literary classic that represents the archetype of the werewolf (the human with the monster hiding inside). Along with Mary Wollstonecraft's "Frankenstein" (the Thing Without a Name) and Bram Stoker's "Dracula" (the Vampire) Robert Louis Stevenson's novella is part of the gothic foundation of the modern horror story (there is really not a single ghost store of equal standing, although "The Turn of the Screw" by Henry James comes close). All have in common the fact that they promise to tell a story that might best be left untold, which, of course, is exactly the sort of story we want to hear.
Given that Stevenson was writing when the genre of horror fiction was not recognized as such, it is surprising that "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" is cast in the form of a mystery novel. Stevenson invites his readers to try and get ahead of the story, to put the clues together and come to the conclusion. Today it is nearly impossible to pick up this story and not know the "secret," but if you think back to the late 19th-century when this story was written you can get a sense for how Stevenson used the biases and limitations of his readers to his advantage in keeping them from what we might consider to be an obvious conclusion.
More importantly, Stevenson is writing several decades before the writings of Sigmund Freud revolutionized the whole idea of human psychology. Yet we can certainly find evidence of the conscious and subconscious mind of which Freud would write. Stevenson reinforces this metaphor with the block of buildings that divides this particular part of London, with one side representing the civilized world of a respected physician and the other side the squalor of the world inhabited by an inhuman creature who gives in to his every earthly desire. The novella also speaks to the topic of evolution, with Hyde being described as "ape-like," reinforcing the idea that our most human attributes remove us ever further from the category of mere animal.
Of the three classic horror novels, "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" is the most accessible. Not only because of its shorter length, but also because its evil is more realistic, even in terms of our imagination. We might be unable to reanimate the dead or to become the walking dead, but we can certainly relate to the idea of unleashing the beast buried with us. Even if we could not, we can recognize the "werewolf" in the real world in the form of serial killers who try to show a civilized face to us in public. This is not to say that the novella is simplistic, for Stevenson offers a sophisticated narrative. If this is one of those literary you have never read because you already know the story, then you should take out an evening to sit down and finally get around to reading it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Man Is A Material Creature", 26 Dec 2010
There's little more to say about Dr J & Mr H than the fact that it is a deserving classic. The story is well known and the way it's told is worth reading the book for.

Of the other stories in this collection, The Merry Men is one of the best written stories I have read. Stevenson's superbly written story of a young man who returns to his uncle's home to ask for his daughter's hand but finds the old man in mental torment is a masterclass in writing. The setting is the "musical' sound of waves (hence The Merry Men) breaking on the rocks of the island of Aros. I have read many a tale but, up to now, precious few as tightly and sparsely written as this one except for, perhaps, Hemingway's The Old Man And The Sea. It's impossible to find a sentence in The Merry Men that could be edited and it's exhilarating to read something by someone who writes with such an astonishing mastery of the English language. The story itself dwells lightly on the duality of sin and retribution perhaps borrowing a little from Dostoevsky. The old man though wont to quoting scripture nevertheless is drawn to strong drink and howling with joy when storms crashing against the rocks send sailors to perdition. This sort of internal conflict is the font of psychological illness.

The four other tales here: Markheim, Thrawn Janet, Ollala and The Treasure of Franchard are in my view nothing special.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Useful Classroom Tool, 10 May 2007
Clearly this is a classic masterpiece and I won't go into the details of the story, however my review is more based around the practical aspects of this particular edition. It is one of the only books that I purchase every year and am able to sell on to my students. My students have to study this text and because of the low cost version even my poorest students are able to purchase a copy for themselves because of this edition. This is an excellent educational tool as it allows the students to annotate their copy which is extremely useful when they sit to do their coursework. Thank you Dover Thrift for making it possible for my students to succeed.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Short but meaningful!, 7 Oct 2009
By 
Helen "Helen" (Surrey, England) - See all my reviews
I got this book for my daughter who is studying it for GCSE and read it as I have never read anything by Stevenson before - I enjoyed the description and themes a lot and feel that this book is very much still relevant today !
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4.0 out of 5 stars An informative but intrusive retelling of this classic story, 7 Aug 2004
By 
Amazon Customer (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Robert Louis Stevenson's "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" is one of the classics of horror literature because it provides the paradigmatic example of the "werewolf," the human being with a monstrous alter ego. However, originally it was much more of a mystery story and that is the best way of describing this adaptation of Stevenson's novella by Michael Lawrence. The book's complex structure is simplified and Lawrence employs a narrator to help retell the tale. The adaptation is certainly competent enough, but the story clearly takes a back seat to the illustrations in this particular volume.
This Eyewitness Classics adaptation of "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" is full of the illustrations and details we have come to associate with books put out by DK Publishing. A two-page spread before the first chapter details The Two Face of London, contrasting the rich West End of Victorian London with Soho area where criminals stalked the poor. Background about how Victorian gentlemen dressed for evening and how women were second-class citizens is provided. Once the story commences there are not only illustrations by Ian Andrew depicting events in the novella, but the borders are usually filled with small photographs and detailed text amplifying the action. One such note might explaining the gas lighting system in use at the time while another actually explains the significance of the key Jekyll supposedly gave to Hyde. These pictures and notes are certainly informative, but they are also somewhat intrusive, especially when the reader is trying to decide when they should read each of these additional bits of information.
The attempt here is to provide something more than a straightforward presentation of the novella without going so far as to provide an annotated version. The information provided is quite useful for young readers, for the most part, but their intrusiveness may well get in the way of enjoying the story itself. The illustrations by Andrew are stylistically evocative of the shadowy, misty streets of London we associate with tales of violent crimes such as "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." A final spread in the back of the book looks at the Legend of the story, which includes the various dramatic versions on stage and screen. More interesting are the insights into how the story reflected what people were thinking about evolution, psychology, and drugs at the end of the 19th-century. The best solution might be to just try and read the story without always resorting to the additional information and then going back and filling in the details (maybe on a chapter by chapter basis). This approach is used in a pair of other "horror" classics, "Dracula" and "The Hunchback of Notre Dame," in the DK Classics series.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The classical tale of the beast buried with us all, 7 April 2004
By 
Amazon Customer (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
"The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" is assured a place in the history of horror fiction because it the literary classic that represents the archetype of the werewolf (the human with the hiding inside). Along with Mary Wollstonecraft's "Frankenstein" (the Thing Without a Name) and Bram Stoker's "Dracula" (the Vampire) Robert Louis Stevenson's novella is part of the gothic foundation of the modern horror story. All have in common the fact that they promise to tell a story that might best be left untold, which, of course, is exactly the sort of story we want to hear.
Given that Stevenson was writing when the genre of horror fiction was not recognized as such, it is surprising that "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" is cast in the form of a mystery novel. Stevenson invites his readers to try and get ahead of the story, to put the clues together and come to the conclusion. Today it is nearly impossible to pick up this story and not know the "secret," but if you think back to the late 19th-century when this story was written you can get a sense for how Stevenson used the biases and limitations of his readers to his advantage in keeping them from what we might consider to be an obvious conclusion.
More importantly, Stevenson is writing several decades before the writings of Sigmund Freud revolutionized the whole idea of human psychology. Yet we can certainly find evidence of the conscious and subconscious mind of which Freud would write. Stevenson reinforces this metaphor with the block of buildings that divides this particular part of London, with one side representing the civilized world of a respected physician and the other side the squalor of the world inhabited by an inhuman creature who gives in to his every earthly desire. The novella also speaks to the topic of evolution, with Hyde being described as "ape-like," reinforcing the idea that our most human attributes remove us ever further from the category of mere animal.
Of the three classic horror novels, "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" is the most accessible. Not only because of its shorter length, but also because its evil is more realistic, even in terms of our imagination. We might be unable to reanimate the dead or to become the walking dead, but we can certainly relate to the idea of unleashing the beast buried with us. Even if we could not, we can recognize the "werewolf" in the real world in the form of serial killers who try to show a civilized face to us in public. This is not to say that the novella is simplistic, for Stevenson offers a sophisticated narrative. If this is one of those literary you have never read because you already know the story, then you should take out an evening to sit down and finally get around to reading it.
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25 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 108 years old and still brilliant!, 14 Jan 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Penguin Popular Classics) (Paperback)
Like most people I knew the story of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and for this reason Stevenson's book was never top of my to read list. However, by taking this attitude I was making a big mistake. Even though I knew the ultimate conclusion I still couldn't put this book down. The atmosphere of chilling intrigue and dread that runs throughout the novella kept me on edge constantly. The narration is by the characters, including Dr. Jekyll himself, this adds a desperate anxiety to the narrative and as the plot unfolds this mode of narration creates in the reader a strange mixture of empathy and a hungry desire for the horrific details to be revealed.
After reading the book I was left with a feeling of unease, which I put down to the fact that what Stevenson was essentially writing about, false respectability, the paradox between what one needs/wants to do and what society demands and our unwillingness to address these factors, are not simply bygone symptoms of a repressive Victorian society, these are issues that are as endemic today as they were then.
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The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Penguin Popular Classics)
The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Penguin Popular Classics) by Robert Louis Stevenson (Paperback - 25 Jan 2007)
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