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4.2 out of 5 stars74
4.2 out of 5 stars
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on 10 February 2001
This book was fun to read to my children and they enjoyed listening. It uses bright colours to keep the child interested. It is also repetitive which is very helpful in teaching young children to read.
It also mentions different hours of day, which again is also adding to a child's growing understanding of time.
It deals with size through illustration so the child can compare the ladybird to other animals.
Friendship and sharing are also covered in this book.
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on 12 February 2007
My 6 year old son was offered this book last year, and we both still enjoy reading this fun and morally relevant story. As the scenario repeats itself over the pages with different animals, the child quickly picks it up and joins in to act the bad tempered ladybird. An happy end rounds it up perfectly. I recommand it for 4 year olds to young readers.
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on 20 February 2009
To be honest, I've been avoiding this for a year or so because I thought Carle was a bit of a one-hit wonder, although I have another non-caterpillar book of his (Dream Snow) that I like. I've always loved the way his books look, and Caterpillar is about the best book for kids ever - covering days, numbers, sun and moon etc, while looking very beautiful and having a dash of wit. And this one just seemed at first glance to try to explain time, and the animals seemed too weird, and the Carle pictures seemed a bit complicatedly muddy for a toddler, so I left it.

But my mum bought it for my daughter yesterday and I read it to her. 'Read it again!'. I read it again. Five times in a row yesterday (until supper) and three times this morning. It is very witty and funny, DOES send out the right message to kids, and the new animals are welcome because toddlers know all the old animals by now. So she is newly fascinated by the praying mantis, the skunk, the wasp and the aphids. There's a lovely whale tail cut out at the end and you get to make a SMACK noise by clapping your hands, which your little terrorist will love (but don't worry, liberals! no intentional violence!) and it DOES teach you that being kind and sharing is the best thing to do or you will be humiliated, and it also teaches that standing up to bullies is a good idea because they might be scared off by your resolve and courage. It's a really really good book.
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on 5 October 2000
This delightful book is one of the most popular Eric Carle stories at the nursery where I teach. The children (aged from three to five) love the colourful pictures, and, of course, the ladybird is one creature that fascinates all children. We have been able to draw a great deal of work from this deceptively simple little book. We retell the story, thus developing language skills, add spots to a big ladybird to help counting skills, use collage to produce our own ladybirds (emulating Carle's quirky illustrative style) and use paint programs on the school computers to draw ladybirds (and develop ICT skills), not to mention all the scientific observation the story inspires! Most of all, though, we enjoy the book for what it is: an enjoyable story with attractive illustrations and a strong storyline. We base almost all of our work for a whole half term on Eric Carle stories and the only rival to the bad tempered ladybird's place in "Nursery Two"'s affections is 'The Very Hungry Caterpillar'!
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on 12 July 2014
I remember this book from my childhood, so had no hesitation in buying it to read to my daughter.

I got a bit of a shock when it arrived - I didn't remember the ladybird being quite so aggressive!

However, I changed the word "bad-tempered" to "grumpy" (a word my daughter is familiar with) and it works great. She loves "reading" along with me, and now we can even make comparisons with the book: if she doesn't got to sleep, she will be grumpy in the morning. And if she's grumpy, she will make me grumpy. Because that's how it works. Grumpiness spreads. All the other animals were quite happy doing whatever they were doing until the grumpy ladybird came along and made them grumpy too.
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on 5 December 2015
This is a brilliantly classic story book. I used to read this as a child and was thrilled to be able to read it to my children. I love timeless books that you can read and read over the years. The message doesn't get old or look dated. My toddlers loved the thought of this little bad tempered ladybird fighting his way through the book. They also loved the naming of all the insects and Animals he meets on his way. The writing gets bigger and bigger as the animals he meets, get bigger and my kids were very interested in this and asked lots of questions.
This story grows with your children. My 7 year old loves still to read it and now is keen in the sentence structure, and the spelling of words eg. Aphids! Which is fantastic. And then there is a lovely little lesson about being patient and grateful at the end which is a great discussion point with little people. Wonderful endearing story!
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on 21 August 2015
This one isn't quite as good as The Very Hungry Caterpillar, but it's still a good story with some really lovely illustrations. The Bad Tempered Ladybird is really quite grumpy indeed and spends his time going around trying to pick fights with all the bigger animals to prove how tough he is, until he realises that what he really wants to do is sit on a leaf and eat aphids all day. There's lots of nice repetition to keep non-readers interested in the story.

Cutesy factoid: Eric Carle dedicated this book to ladybirds, for eating the aphids in gardens and saving plants.
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on 3 April 2015
Incredibly repetitive and boring to read as an adult. I accept that kids enjoy an element of repetition, I understand that, I get it, but this is the most repetitive children's book I've read by far. Furthermore, as the title suggests, the bad tempered ladybird basically flies around challenging various creatures to a fight, on every page, '..wanna fight?' Not the best behavioural example to set for your child. I only bought it because my 4 year old son is reading all Eric Carle's books at school and he was quoting from this one. In short, I hate it.
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on 23 April 2007
I loved this book as a child and now my 5 year old and almost 2 year old love it too. It is timeless, and with the animals getting ever larger along with the text very clever too. It is also a good early teacher of the concept of time with the Bad Tempered Ladybird meeting each different animal at 'something' O'clock.
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on 30 August 2015
I wanted my daughter to have a healthy collection of Eric Carle books because the hungry caterpillar, very busy spider and very quiet cricket are such lovely books for a two year old and she adores them. However, this book didn't live up to expectation. It didn't hold my daughters attention past the first page but I continued to read it just get an idea on the story and although the moral of the story is a good one, it's boringly repetitive. Hopefully as she gets a bit older it'll hold her interest better but for now, it's shelved!
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