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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Essential for the civilised reader/listener
It is about Aeneas, but there are two others who must be mentioned.

First there is Paul Scofield, whose wonderful voice enriches this telling of the story immensely. At times you hardly notice him, as he lets the poetry do its own work. But then you realise how his grasp of the cadences of Virgil's poetry and his ability to bring out the meaning, where the...
Published on 1 Nov 2009 by William

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10 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not Robert Fagles's finest hour
People like me, who come to the classics first in translation, owe a huge debt to Robert Fagles. His translations of Homer, Aeschylus and Sophocles were the first form in which many of us encountered those authors. There is a grandeur and a rough-hewn simplicity about his work that seems to suit these authors well, even if there are other ways of translating them - for...
Published on 15 May 2010 by lexo1941


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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Essential for the civilised reader/listener, 1 Nov 2009
By 
This review is from: The Aeneid (Audio CD)
It is about Aeneas, but there are two others who must be mentioned.

First there is Paul Scofield, whose wonderful voice enriches this telling of the story immensely. At times you hardly notice him, as he lets the poetry do its own work. But then you realise how his grasp of the cadences of Virgil's poetry and his ability to bring out the meaning, where the dense classical text in translation can be demanding, makes this a real pleasure to listen to.

Then there is Virgil. Others will know more of him than I did, but for me it was striking how the character from Dante: Inferno (Penguin Classics)now made so much more sense. He tells a story sad and powerful. In fact there are several stories. First he follows on from Homer and picks up the story of the The Iliad (Penguin Classics) describing the fate of Troy. Then he tells us the wonderful story of Dido and Aeneas. I stopped at this point to listen to Purcell - Dido and Aeneas. This is where I knew that Virgil could tell it how it is. Then there is the descent into the underworld, prefiguring Dante, and last is the account of the foundation of Rome, looking ahead to the Caesars and many others.

If you want to join the dots in the classical world, this is the book. If you want to get the power of the spoken tale, then it would be hard to do better than listen to Paul Scofield.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bringing epic alive!, 6 Aug 2004
By 
Mrs. M. P. Small "Grammatica" (HARROW, Middlesex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Aeneid, The (Audio Cassette)
This recording really brings alive the elegant translation by C. Day Lewis. It features Paul Scofield, Jill Balcon, Toby Stephens, Stephen Thorne, Geraldine Fitzgerald and John McAndrew. It is a joy to hear the beautiful, unhurried declamation of the actors who narrate the story and play the various characters. Full justice is given to the drama and the force of the poetry, especially the similes. This version is abridged, omitting most of Books III and V and all of Books VIII, IX, X and XI. The accompanying notes give a resume of all the books, so anyone not familiar with the epic is not left in the dark. There is also a helpful piece about the poem and brief details about the actors. The music from Fanelli's 'Symphonic Pictures' sets the atmosphere.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a pity it's abridged!, 12 April 2013
This review is from: The Aeneid (Audio CD)
It's not clear from the front cover that this is an abridged version so potential purchasers need to realise that these four discs make major cuts,
though mercifully few to Book II. What's also not clear that this is the wonderful C Day Lewis translation which brings everything to life with vividness
and conviction.... 'and the bronze accoutrements winking' is one of the few infelicitous phrases that remind you this is a translation, not simply
the most exciting narrative poem you've ever heard. Elsewhere, Day Lewis's words are wonderfully transparent: you simply find yourself reliving Aeneas's adventures.

Paul Scofield, although he sounds slightly inebriated and is possibly sight-reading, has wonderful gravitas as the narrator: a pity Naxos didn't persuade him to narrate Paradise Lost. Jill Balcon (C. Day Lewis's widow) and Geraldine Fitzgerald are first-class in the women's roles and Toby Stephens is impressive as a suitably ardent and youthful Aeneas.

A magnificent set which leaves one wanting more.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Aeneid, 6 May 2010
By 
A. Murray (Italy) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Aeneid (Audio CD)
If it is time travelling that you want, this is for you. Virgil's epic is trully engaging and compelling. With a weenie-bit of imagination will you be able to see Troy and the many journeys across the seas to reach a new land, the struggle of the Lydians and their arrival in Etruria!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Better than the Iliad., 14 Mar 2014
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This review is from: The Aeneid (Audio CD)
Of course you have to listen to the Iliad and the Odessy before you listen to the Aeniad or it won't make sense. But as they are poetry they should be heard by a good actor and not read - they are too difficult to read and do not come to life - but audio books are wonderful for the car, plane or bedtime! Especially good for educating children into the world of classics without tears.
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30 of 43 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Beautiful Epic, 10 Mar 2004
This review is from: The Aeneid (Audio CD)
The Aeneid of Virgil has some of the most beautiful poetry ever written, all of which has to be read out loud to get the best effect - the audio cd is a great way to hear the poem without wearing out your voice - it also leaves your hands free to do other things (such as wash the dishes!)
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10 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not Robert Fagles's finest hour, 15 May 2010
By 
lexo1941 (Edinburgh, Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Aeneid (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
People like me, who come to the classics first in translation, owe a huge debt to Robert Fagles. His translations of Homer, Aeschylus and Sophocles were the first form in which many of us encountered those authors. There is a grandeur and a rough-hewn simplicity about his work that seems to suit these authors well, even if there are other ways of translating them - for example, although I enjoy Fagles's versions of Homer, I wouldn't want to be without Lattimore's Iliad or Fitzgerald's Odyssey.

However, I think that even his fans would agree that towards the end of his life, Fagles flagged. His translation of the Aeneid is a case in point. I am in no way a classical scholar, but my very limited Latin and Greek are still good enough to tell me that Virgil and Homer had very different styles as writers. However, Fagles's Virgil is remarkably reminiscent of Fagles's Homer. The Fagles 'Aeneid' isn't a bad read, but there is a rough, rollicking, yarn-like quality to it that just isn't Virgilian. Fagles seems to have been a bit hypnotised by his own gifts, because this is just too much like his earlier translations, and too much unlike Virgil, for me to be able to recommend it.
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4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not for the feint hearted but for the hard of hearing!, 30 Jun 2010
By 
Mrs. Karen Johnson "Book Worm" (Hertfordshire) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Aeneid (Audio CD)
Bought as a revision aid for Classical Civilisations GCSE and perhaps that was the disappointment. This Audio CD was not necessarily meant for that.

The reading of this inspirational story was loud, harsh and too formal. Someone with a love of the Classics should have read it, thus with passion and inspiration.

Didn't therefore like this version and it did not help for my purpose. However, that is not to say this would be the case for everyone. Not my personal idea of a decent study guide or even-tide listening.
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The Aeneid (Penguin Classics)
The Aeneid (Penguin Classics) by Virgil (Paperback - 26 July 2007)
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