Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn more Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars11
4.2 out of 5 stars
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£9.98+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 16 November 2001
This is Nietzsche at his best. Dangerous, ferocious , cunning and ultimately devastating. Here Nietzsche bares his teeth at the world and rips apart covention but always, always with a demonic grin on his satirical face. 'Human all to Human - can any man create a title more apt? His criticism of humanity is so incisive and decisive that many may quail on reading this text. Yet let all you faint hearted people be assured that Nietzsche's intention was not ridicule, per se. He challenges all our concepts and forces us to question our behaviour and thoughts - both as individuals and as a society.
Nieztsche is, in this work, inherently contradictory but this is , as always, his aim. His view is that there are no such things as absolutes yet he openly asks us to question his own statement on the grounds that if this is the case then his ideas are themselves doubtfull.
Thus 'Human all to Human' is a book of tremendous power and one that gives a novice, as well as the expert, more than a litte to dwell on.
0Comment|7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 January 2007
Whether you ultimately agree or disagree with Nietzsche at the end of his book you will have read one of the most cutting and persuasive arguments for the fallibility of man ever published.

Human all too Human certainly isn't The 7 Habits of Highly effective People, or How to Win friends and Influence People, but it is an infinitely more richly rewarding and brutally honest book than that any of the white lies and generic plagiarised so called `truths' to be found in those works and others of their ilk.

In essence I believe it is actually a positive work, although having read it through over a period of time it does have the tendency to flavour one slightly negatively towards other people and maybe even oneself at times. In hindsight I'd recommend dipping into it regularly rather than wolfing it down in one go, and definitely don't touch if you're feeling a bit down on yourself or the World at that point in time. Metaphorically speaking, a strong stomach is required! But, in the same way as looking in a bright mirror can spur us sometimes to change some aspect of our appearance we find distasteful, this book can inspire. To me the message is `Know yourself and your nature and rise above it to become a free and clear-eyed spirit rather than a bound and blind one'. Far from the Nihilist he is sometimes incorrectly if understandably (to those who read him lazily) painted as having been, Nietzsche was a man who encouraged others to reach their potential ( `become what you are') even if it meant they first had to face themselves honestly.

This book is written with more honesty and white hot wit than any other book on human nature I have read to date and it will fascinate and disturb you if you take your time and read it sincerely. I lost count of how many annotations I made in my now well worn copy, or as I put the book down and just thought about what I'd read as it sunk in like a arrow shot from the page.

Walter Kaufmann (who wrote arguably, the best book on Nietzsche's views) said he loved Nietzsche's books although he didn't always agree with his outlooks. This is more or less how I felt after this wonderful. Nietzsche makes you think. This is maybe his greatest gift to those who choose to read his books. It's worth remembering that Nietszche suffered much both physically and psychologically and arguably did not always have a lot of love in his life beyond a small circle of friends. So, don't skip the introduction and let the editors of this terrific Penguins Classics edition position this work for you in context of the man himself and the time of his life it was written in. It will make it all the more valuable and enjoyable.
0Comment|17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 September 2004
Subsequent to the original publication of 'Human All Too Human', Nietzsche published two fairly lengthy supplements, 'Assorted Opinions and Maxims' and 'The Wanderer and His Shadow'. All three were combined in 1886 to produce the second edition of 'Human All Too Human'. This (Penguin) edition is only the first edition. Look instead on Amazon for the Cambridge edition, also translated by Hollingdale, which is the second edition and is much longer (and not much more expensive either).
22 comments|43 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 16 November 2001
This is Nietzsche at his best. Dangerous, ferocious , cunning and ultimately devastating. Here Nietzsche bares his teeth at the world and rips apart covention but always, always with a demonic grin on his satirical face. 'Human all to Human - can any man create a title more apt? His criticism of humanity is so incisive and decisive that many may quail on reading this text. Yet let all you faint hearted people be assured that Nietzsche's intention was not ridicule, per se. He challenges all our concepts and forces us to question our behaviour and thoughts - both as individuals and as a society.
Nieztsche is, in this work, inherently contradictory but this is , as always, his aim. His view is that there are no such things as absolutes yet he openly asks us to question his own statement on the grounds that if this is the case then his ideas are themselves doubtfull.
Thus 'Human all to Human' is a book of tremendous power and one that gives a novice, as well as the expert, more than a litte to dwell on.
0Comment|30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Nietzsche's watershed book that sold 100 plus copies in his lifetime written after he gave up teaching and became an itinerant. His thoughts range over a vast multitude of ideas and the only system is in his head. He is creating the loom for a tapestry for his later thoughts. The Cambridge edition is twice as long as the standard both translated by Hollingdale after Kaufmman decided he would only concentrate on the later works. Therefore if you have the money buy this Cambridge version.

This collects a large number of aphorisms. The question on whether this is philosophy or not is answered by his eshewing all systems and this reflects flux. Systems fail to capture the complexity of human thought and experience. They impose categories that do not exist except inside the philosophers head. The difference between the real world and the apparent world as the latter is always submerged underneath the fixed follies of an era.

The emphasis is on the immediacy of the organs; ear, nose, mouth in capturing the vitality of being. These organs linked to the emotional system produce reality. He eschews those who wish to categorise and define the world within the image of the times. Science, Darwinism and Christianity are all placed within the pestle and mortar and finely ground then held for inspection. Thoughts that appeared unassailable become transparent. Socialism and its inherent levelling also comes under attack. Less strident than his later works this is a blunderbuss rather than a well aimed rifle shot as he vents his ire at all pre-occupations.

His mysoginy is a wince maker but persevering with some of the insights produces fresh perspectives. The beauty is in his ability to strip away the flattery to expose the deceit. This benefits from dipping in rather than ingesting whole as anyone who calls themselves a Nietzschean is going to be carrying a number of commpeting ideas. People like easily digestible systems and critical thinking is not a product of the education system as he points out. Robotic learning creates the standard mindset.
11 comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 September 2011
Without putting my own slant and interpretation of this work down as something that will cloud your own judgement of it, I'll just say that it is mind-blowing. As a piece of intellectual capital it is invaluable.

I enjoy reading philosophy purely out of my own curiosity. Every book opens up a new way of looking at the world and another avenue to explore. This book, however, is the one that has so far had the greatest impact. There is a lot of misinformation out there about Nietzsche; so much so that I approached this book already holding a fair bit of skepticism about it. All that was blown away within half an hour of reading.

I can't see anyone thoughtful disliking this book: it is enlightening rather than a strict code; and it is also, for that reason, a little dark, in that it tells us what we perhaps don't want to know about ourselves, or at least admit. He's one of those people who's thinking has a deep effect on you - or me, certainly. You may find yourself taking a long drive just to get your head around and be accepting of some of his ideas, which I believe for some will have the potential to be life-changing.

This is fantastic, a must buy if you've come far enough to read this.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 April 2014
This comes with a warning in the front of the book stating that it may have typos due to the fact that the publishers let a piece of software translate it from the original german. It's not unreadable but is a far cry from a well published book that you might find in your local book shop. It is still entirely readable but I wish that I had been warned of this before purchasing.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 January 2011
The Penguin version for kindle is much better formatted and translated than any other version available on kindle. The cheaper versions are old translations with mistakes and poor formatting. WARNING: THIS VERSION IS ONLY VOL. 1 OF HUMAN ALL TOO HUMAN. THE CAMBRIDGE PAPERBACK IS BOTH VOLUMES.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
In these short comments and aphorisms, F. Nietzsche asks himself: `Cannot all values be overturned?' And, `Is Good perhaps Evil?' (3)
His answers to these provocative questions are rather boring and don't reach the same level of his biting, polemic, destructive shouting in his later work.
There are exceptions, like `Almost every politician needs an honest man so badly that, like a ravenous wolf, he breaks into a sheep pen: not in order to eat the ram he has stolen, but rather to hide behind its woolly back.' (470) Or, `Convictions are more dangerous enemies of truth than lies.' (483)

Of course, one can find here the seeds of his later philosophizing with a hammer, but they are rather meager one.

Good and Evil
`In the soul of the ruling clans and castes, the man who has the power to requite goodness with goodness, evil with evil, is called "good". The man who is unpowerful and cannot requite is taken for bad.' (45)

Religion
`Ruling persons and classes will be enlightened about the benefit provided by religion; they are using it as a tool.' The state needs (the priest's) most private, secret education of souls. Without the help of priests no power can become legitimate.' (472)

Christianity
`All psychological inventions of Christianity work toward the deep corruption of head and heart. Christianity wants to destroy, shatter, intoxicate.' (114)

Anti-democratic stance and contempt for the masses
`A higher culture can come into being where there are two castes of society: the caste of forced labor and the caste of free labor.' (439)
And, quoting Voltaire: `Once the populace begins to reason, all is lost.' (438)

`Pithy is nothing less than a disease.' (47)

Power and morality
`This is how the brutal, powerful man acts, the original founder of a state, who subjects to himself those who are weaker. Force precedes morality. (99)

The characteristics of his later works are still absent here: Christ is still the `noblest being', no misogyny and no war worship.

This book is not a good introduction to Nietzsche's work; better are `Genealogy of Morals' or `Beyond Good and Evil'.
Only for Nietzsche fans and scholars.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 October 2015
Other reviewers cover the content adequately, but needless to say, a must read for post Hegel enlightenment! Recommended.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)