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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic classic!
Reading the classics is often quite hard work. Commonly there will be a turn of phrase of wording, or dialects which are non-too familiar to the modern reader. This is surprisingly easy to read, the main challenge by modern standards is therefore simply one of length.
Whereas I can often finish a Kindle novel in a couple of sessions this was much longer, but never...
Published on 9 Mar. 2013 by YeahYeahNoh

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars as I read it with little enjoyment, and only read it to the end because ...
This novel has probably put me off reading a lot of other classic literature, as I read it with little enjoyment, and only read it to the end because others had deemed it so great. I really did not take to the premise of the poor student who coldly decides to kill an aging moneylender ( he talks of her as a louse, but really he is the louse) and then spends the rest of...
Published 7 months ago by Mr. Robert Marsland


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic classic!, 9 Mar. 2013
By 
YeahYeahNoh (Willenhall, West Midlands) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
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Reading the classics is often quite hard work. Commonly there will be a turn of phrase of wording, or dialects which are non-too familiar to the modern reader. This is surprisingly easy to read, the main challenge by modern standards is therefore simply one of length.
Whereas I can often finish a Kindle novel in a couple of sessions this was much longer, but never boring. I found it demanded longer sessions of attention though, so at times I had this for when I had half an hour or more, and other shorter/lighter books for those snatched moments on the bus, train or before meetings!
I didn't really know what to expect. What I got was a great story, with romance, mystery, and of course both crime and punishment! Genuinely glad to have finally read this, and this Penguin edition is excellent. The annotated text is easy to follow, and the notes are regular enough to be useful, but not so often as to be annoying.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Frenzied and macabre, 3 Dec. 2010
By 
Roman Clodia (London) - See all my reviews
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Dark, thrilling, frenzied and macabre, this is the most accessible way into Dostoevsky. Built around the story of a crime, this yet spills over into the satirical and philosophical.

The figures of Raskolnikov and Sonya are both realistic and yet also representational and it is part of Dostoevsky's tragic and almost manic vision that it is the prostitute who can offer a form of redemption.

Some people have complained that this is a depressing book: it's certainly dark and has no easy happy ending - but is still a powerful glimpse into Dostoevsky's mind.
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4.0 out of 5 stars crime and punishment, 15 Nov. 2012
It may not be fair to give only four stars however my reasoning for this is due to how different it is to other books I have read. This book is of a unique nature and in an intelligent way too. The author first of all tells the events of what happened in the murderer's perspective. The rest of the story falls into a general narrative. So although anyone sane doesn't agree what he did to be correct, it tricks the reader into giving sympathy towards this character Raskolnikoff. It covers the subjects of guilt, remorse and justice. I found it to be really sinister and eerie in parts not in a bad way but this shows that the author has created a certain sort of atmosphere for the reader to take part in. The amount of characters can play havoc with the memory but stay with it as it is totally worth it. I really enjoyed reading this I would however have to say that I do not think that I will read anything like it once again, so I may need to read it again one day.
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2.0 out of 5 stars as I read it with little enjoyment, and only read it to the end because ..., 28 Oct. 2014
By 
Mr. Robert Marsland (Glasgow) - See all my reviews
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This novel has probably put me off reading a lot of other classic literature, as I read it with little enjoyment, and only read it to the end because others had deemed it so great. I really did not take to the premise of the poor student who coldly decides to kill an aging moneylender ( he talks of her as a louse, but really he is the louse) and then spends the rest of the book justifying his actions. The other main character of the girl he befriends who is trying to be a prostitute, comes across as pathetic to my mind too. I don't quite know what Dostoevsky was aiming at, but it just came across as pointless (if there was any redemption in the story it was just too weak), with both unsympathetic characters and storyline.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful and collectible Edition, 29 Jun. 2014
By 
Samuel Romilly (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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Dostoevsky needs no comment from me. Instead I shall praise this beautiful edition. It is striking, handsome, and collectible. It is the best in the series after the incomparable edition of Lady Chatterley's Lover. Each volume originally sold for £100.
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5.0 out of 5 stars a truly interesting read, 28 April 2014
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Almost modern in some respects. Fascinating character and really makes you question the morality of the various people involved. Really enjoyed this.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars philosphy, 15 July 2013
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Dostoyevsky explores Crime, punishment and redemption in surroundings of poverty squalor and intellectual consideration of man as individual and as part of a society. If there is a weakness for the reader today it would be that the redemption effected is a Christian one and the ending may be construed as sentimental BUT as the ethical standards in our largely secular society relate closely to those of a Christian society this is for the individual reader to decide.
.
The exploration of a mind is what entices me to read and reread this book..
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Limited designed by Fuel, 2 Jan. 2007
By 
T. Phillips "Tom" (Hampshire, England) - See all my reviews
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I won't bother writing a review about Crime and Punishment, it's a truly amazing and unforgettable novel that should be read by all, and there are plenty of other in-depth reviews on other editions. What I will write about is the fantastic limited edition here - it looks truly stunning in it's perspex case. Get one whilst you can!

In case Amazon still haven't added a picture, Penguin have one on their web site.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars On the enduring relevance of the "classics"..., 1 Oct. 2012
By 
John P. Jones III (Albuquerque, NM, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Crime and Punishment (Classics) (Paperback)
Fyodor Dostoyevsky published this novel in 1866. It is widely regarded as one of the "classics" of Russian literature, has become a "school assignment book," which accounts for some but not all the 1-star reviews. The thoughtful 1-stars focus on the problems with the various editions, primarily involving not knowing if you are purchasing a proper and readable text, with a noted translator. I purchased my copy from a second-hand bookstore in Santa Fe, NM. It is a "Penguin Classics" and the translator is David Magarshack. It has no ISBN number, nor date of publication. Of the 70 or so versions available at Amazon, this appears NOT to be included! Yet, it is a most readable version, properly printed by Penguin, so it is regrettable that I cannot more specifically identify it for recommendation purposes.

As for the novel itself, it worked well for me on several different levels. It is set primarily in St. Petersburg... and not at the level of the nobility, as would be the case in numerous Tolstoy novels. Like Charles Dickens' London, or Emile Zola's Paris of the same period, Dostoyevsky focuses on the lives of the lower classes. A mother, with numerous small children, is dying of consumption (tuberculosis). There are the "pub scenes," in which a lowly civil servant, Marmeladov, pours out his heart about his problems, with alcoholism being Exhibit A. Most of the characters are scrounging for their next meal. Many have only one, or possibly two sets of clothes. A daughter becomes a prostitute in order to support the family. Dostoyevsky draws an impressive range of characters, which includes a couple with money.

The main protagonist is Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov, a student, or more properly, ex-student, trying to get by with some help from his mother in the provinces. He decides to murder an old female moneylender, and by page 100, has accomplished the deed (this is the "crime" of the title.) Dostoyevsky's psychological portrait of Raskolnikov (as he is invariably called throughout the novel) is one of the true strengths of the novel, even today; and it must have been absolutely "cutting edge" at the time. There is also the "murder mystery" aspect of the novel. True, the reader knows who commits the crime, but will he be caught, particularly by the police inspector, Porfiry? The "cat and mouse" scenes involving the two are brilliantly developed. And to what extent does Raskolnikov simply feel guilty about killing an old woman, as well as some "collateral damage," and thus feel compelled to confess to someone?

Several female characters are depicted. There is Raskolnikov's sister and mother. The mother's devotion to her son is normal, but undeserved. His sister, Dunya, commences her working life as a governess, survives a serious scandal and is vindicated, and later is engaged to an older man in St. Petersburg. Throughout, her portrait is one of a woman of growing strength and independence of character. There is also Sonya, the "prostitute with the heart of gold" who will become Raskolnikov's confidant.

Dostoyevsky also has woven in sections, and one entire chapter as social commentary. Luzhin, who was the fiancée of Dunya, is living with a younger, and naturally "more hip" student, Lebezyatnikov. This arrangement sets the stage for a long discourse on women in society, their "place," the trade-offs of marriage, "communes," and "free-love." It had an amazingly 1960's ring to it, as opposed to the 1860's. And even more germane to contemporary events, Raskolnikov had written a paper, and even contemplated his actions, under the premise that there are two classes of people: those that have to obey the laws, and those that do not. Is a key indicator of the truly powerful that they are unrestrained by the laws that inhibit the rest of us?

It is rather embarrassing that it has taken me this long to finally get around to reading one of the classics of world literature, but I'll hide behind the hoary cliché: Better late than never. 5-stars.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enough to make every other author throw in their cards, 19 Feb. 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Crime and Punishment (Classics) (Paperback)
C&P, Notes from Underground, The Devils and, of course, Brothers Karamazov are the high watermarks of Dostoevsky's work. IMO C&P and Notes serve as the best introductions to his universe.
I highly recommend the original Garnett translations; Jessie Coulson's are also fine and the recent ones by Pevear And Verkoevensky are spoken of highly, and represent the closest rendering of Dostoevsky's Russian into English. Best to avoid some of the others - they often achieve the seeming impossible of making Dostoevsky's text seem dull!
The critical literature on Dostoevsky's work is enormous, but the best general introductions would be the Joseph Frank multi-volume work (one of five left to go, eagerly awaited if Frank is still alive!). I also heartily recommend Bakhtin's Problems of Dostoevsky's Poetics, the masterwork on so many artistic and aesthetic aspects of Dostoevsky's work.
One final note on something I saw in another review. Dostoevsky did not have Nietzsche's Ubermensch in mind when he wrote C&P. It appears Dostoevsky had never even heard of Nietzsche. Nietzsche is known though to have read C&P (probably in an inferior French translation) and greatly admired it, though Dostoevsky's Christian perspective would, no doubt, have aggravated him. Nietzsche's Ubermenschen idea can only be very loosely related to the substance of Raskolnikov's theories of the superior individual.
Buy this book!
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Crime and Punishment (Classics)
Crime and Punishment (Classics) by F. M. Dostoevsky (Paperback - 29 Aug. 1991)
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