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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Philosophy in Praxis
Madness was a psycho somatic reaction to the world around him. It was not Nietzsche going mad through genes, it was isolation and loneliness, need, longing, desire drifting inward because the only conversations he could have were with himself. His fathers death finally detonated upon him. As a child he endured the abyss and is spun out from an early age. The world had...
Published on 23 Aug 2011 by Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles

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3.0 out of 5 stars I Like Nietzsche but this is not his best
I like Nietzsche and have given other books he has written 5 stars.
However I was slightly bored in this book with the endless (ironic) self-praises and self-adulation.
The book is in the main some scattered remarks on his like and previous books that don't add much new.

It is not a *bad* book. Nietzsche is still a genius. But this is not his best...
Published 18 months ago by sanyata


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Philosophy in Praxis, 23 Aug 2011
By 
Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles "FIST" (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One is (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
Madness was a psycho somatic reaction to the world around him. It was not Nietzsche going mad through genes, it was isolation and loneliness, need, longing, desire drifting inward because the only conversations he could have were with himself. His fathers death finally detonated upon him. As a child he endured the abyss and is spun out from an early age. The world had become destablised and instead he created a new world, where he excelled in an Ancient Greece. Socrates disturbed his rhythm with his reason and dialectics and Fred sought to assimilate him.

Nietzsche's self affirmation embodied within the subtitles of Ecce Home denotes the last stand, before the tides of modern ennui washed over him. Searching for meaning he found silliness and backwardness, locked hand in hand in an infantilism, shutting out his version of reality, the flux of charades people inhabit to make sense of the universal meaninglessness they parade in various hallucinations of reality.

Church, Science, Socialism and Materialism had captured the imaginations and reduced everyone to cyphers, regulated by machines and customs so their individual essence became hidden within these greater mass projections. The social world drifted into collective fantasies, that provided individual recompense. His warnings about the rush to embrace more alienation, was, and is still, unheeded. The calls for a more authentic life fell on deaf sodden ground, as satiation in must have events, took over the imagination. Authenticity became a shallow pre-occupation.

This was not the ravings of a mad man, they were embracing parties, nationalities, events and beliefs. They sought salvation in this world as cyphers of greater systems. The individual was embraced by these denizens and pulled down into their ferment, wrapped and mumified in their belief structures. Any dissent was a case for the psychiatrist. Madness was the yardstick the sane were measured by. In a few years time Europe will have pulled itself to pieces based upon various fictions; Religion, Capitalism, Nazism, Fascism, Communism and then conveniently new adherents will arise to rebuild these fictions to enslave new generations. This was the true madness, the whistle blow to mount the trench at Somme, the mass carnage at Verdun, Kursk, Stalingrad,Vietnam and Iraq.

This was the madness he railled against, the normative beliefs of those who cannot step into the Heraclitean flux, those who need the safety ropes, the comfort pillows of certainty of the herd, those who cannot understand the Dyonisian frenzy or the Appollonian calm. They require constant satiation and outside stimulation.

In the end he pulled up the shutters, affirmed himself as sane and retreated within. The world nearly cracked in two over these beliefs. Capitalism triumphed because it provided room for manoeuvre for those who can see ahead but it provide them with a straightjacket. The other systems died through paralysis and boredom.

This sums up his last stand, and makes sense if you have read the others, but there again, he also precis' his works as themes, so you can make the choice- the beginning of his philosophy is in its practice.
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41 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Masterly autobiography, 27 Oct 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One is (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
I like Muhammed Ali. I like his elan, audacity, humour and lack of humility. Nietzsche, in this autobiography is the same and not the same. I find it an extremely moving reckoning of the life that one man had so far lived; alone. Nietzshce gives us some classsic phrases: 'I am not a man, I am dynamite' and, speaking of himself in the third person, 'one is either born after him or before him'. Many readers have noted the unchained egotism as a sign of the madness that was to possess him in a few weeks time, yet there are moments in this book of truly profound and moving humility. Yes, humility, a quality not often associated with Nietzsche, despite being one of his most noticeable and endearing traits;'Perhaps I am a buffon', he writes. Never in the books of any other philosopher that I have read has such an honest admission been made. And that is what makes Nietzsch such a startling figure. He was as clever as they come, he attempted an unparalled rational/emotional assault on life, wrote books that are outstanding, was a historian, psychologist and epigrammist of genius, was continually ignored by the world, and still, summing up the his life's work thus far, knowing how he towered above so many, still he is able to admit to his reader, to himself, that, perhaps, he has got it all wrong. This book is an joyful, witty read.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How One Becomes What One Is, 5 Sep 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One is (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
There seems to be a common belief among Nietzsche scholars that while 'ecco homo' has interest, this interest is largely limited to the study of a man slowly succumbing to his eventual fate of mental collapse. Thus the book's ironic, perhaps parodic, and psychological/philosophical elements are ignored, and regarded as less worthy of citation and analysis than Nietzcshe's notebook jottings that constitute his nachlass.
I think this is a highly suspect position, and that 'ecco homo' contains interesting philosophical insights on, for example, Nietzcshe's health as causing his perspectivism, the importance of 'little things' on great thought, as well as incredible prophetic insights concerning the history of the twentieth century.
In short, don't be put off by the chapter titles or those who consider the book merely as the record of incipient madness. This isn't to deny that Nietzsche wasn't at his intellectual peak - far from it. It is true that he was past his best, and that megalomaniac tendencies are clear throughout this strange work, but i maintain that it contains insights worthy of serious attention.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ecce Homo is Nietzsche's testament., 10 Oct 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One is (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
In my opinion Nietzsche's Ecce Homo is his most moving work; it is a portrait of a man celebrating his existence in the world regardless of his suffering. Perhaps Nietzsche somehow knew that the mental illness which was eventually to incapacitate him was close on the horizon and that he had little time to set the record straight and leave a personal account of his life as he lived it. In Ecce Homo Nietzsche declared 'I am dynamite' and was aware that his work could be used by those who he opposed the most. He was right. Ultimately, Ecce Homo is Nietzsche's final self-portrait and a testament to the celebration of life against diversity.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dionysus versus the Crucified, 21 May 2010
By 
Luc REYNAERT (Beernem, Belgium) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One is (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
This book is some sort of an autobiography of F. Nietzsche with his own short comments on his books, his literary and musical preferences, Christianity and the future of mankind. He also explains why he is a true immoralist.

Nietzsche stresses the all important influence of Schopenhauer in his life: `I very earnestly denied my `will to life' at the time when I first read Schopenhauer.'
His preferred authors are H. Heine, Byron, Stendhal, P. Loti, P. Mérimée, A. France and G. de Maupassant. In music, he likes Rossini, Chopin, Schütz, Haendel, Liszt, Bizet and Bach.

A true immoralist
A true immoralist confirms a double negation; first, of the so-called supreme, good, benevolent and beneficent man, and secondly, of the altruistic Christian morality.
He calls for `a revaluation of all values'. Concepts like God, soul, virtue, sin and eternal life are mere imaginings and lies prompted by the bad instincts of sick natures. All the problems of politics, social organization and education have been falsified because one mistook the most harmful men for great men.

Christianity
Blindness to Christianity is the crime par excellence, the crime against life. Its morality is vampirism. It is the most malignant form of the will to lie. It is a gruesome fact that anti-nature received the highest honors and was fixed over humanity as law and categorical imperative. It invented a `soul' to ruin the body. The Bible is a product of the will to suppress the truth. Its saints are slanderers of the world and violators of man.

Optimism
But, F. Nietzsche remains a fundamental optimist, because men strive for the forbidden. Therefore, his philosophy will triumph one day, because that what was forbidden has always been the truth. Dionysus will be stronger than the doctrine of the Crucified.

This book is a good introduction to the raging style, the reasoning with a hammer, the main themes, the Homeric battles and the `immoral' obsessions of a fascinating, integer, but in some aspects, controversial philosopher with a too egoistic agenda for mankind.
A must read for all Friedrich Nietzsche fans and lovers of Western philosophy.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars German Buddhism, 28 Jun 2010
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This review is from: Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One is (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
I apologise for the title of this review.
It has too often been ignored that what is really fascinating about Nietzsche is something that you just cannot put your finger on.

Who cares about immoralism? That is, Nietzsche is not urging me or you to break the rules, or to be naughty. That just not is his message, or the substance of his books. Nobody could make a reputation like his on that basis. There are reasons for saying that Morality is not the highest of all values. The reason is not that it makes us all behave alike and restricts our impulses. God knows, we need our impulses restrained - and Nietzsche tells us why. So, why was he 'an immoralist'? What is higher than morality?

And it is all to clear that the opposition to Christianity is far too subtle, too refined to be grasped by a mind content with a position of mere disbelief in Christ. And how could Nietzsche, a chronically sick person, mad, reclusive, hypersenstive, even virginal really be the philosopher of the God of viagra, parties, sex, drunkenness? It just does not add up. Nothing about his work holds firm. So what should you make of him? He is by far to subtle and brilliantly secretive.

In parts of his work he says the Jewish prophets are so superior to Christian writers.. in other parts he says the Jews have an evil eye, in others he says that without Christian asceticism we would all be so much debased vermin, in other parts of his oeuvre it is the priest who has shackled and tamed the free blonde beast...

He began his philosophy with Schopenhauer. He mentions that Buddhism is not a religion, but a system of hygiene. In his Ecce Homo he tells us that his own philosophy is a system of hygiene.

Now, transcendental meditation is eastern, Dionysian, overflowing from the inside out, and acutely psychological. Zen teachers often bewilder the reader so as to startle them into untrodden pathways of meditative thought. They advocate pains, just as he does...

Often these days I think that the one thing missing from later German metaphysics such as that of Nietzsche, Heidegger, is just the exposition of a system of meditation. It is like the missing keystone of a arch into an unforessen future, an era which they were all predicting, these reclusive mystics, deep curious and miraculous fore runners, confused militaristic weaklings who despised the world while trying to make it new and save it...
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3.0 out of 5 stars I Like Nietzsche but this is not his best, 20 Jun 2013
This review is from: Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One is (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
I like Nietzsche and have given other books he has written 5 stars.
However I was slightly bored in this book with the endless (ironic) self-praises and self-adulation.
The book is in the main some scattered remarks on his like and previous books that don't add much new.

It is not a *bad* book. Nietzsche is still a genius. But this is not his best book. Try starting with 'Beyond Good and Evil' instead.
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5.0 out of 5 stars AN INTERESTING LOOK INTO NIETZSCHE AS USUAL - IT MAKES ..., 4 Sep 2014
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AN INTERESTING LOOK INTO NIETZSCHE AS USUAL - IT MAKES YOU THINK A LOT AND YOU GET PIECES OF HIS PERSONALITY
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 30 Oct 2014
This review is from: Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One is (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
Extremely interesting
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great and witty Thinker,Thinks it through., 15 Nov 2010
By 
Ken Raus "Ken Raus" (Lugdunum) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One is (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
A lot of quatsch is written by liberal apologistas about how the Nazional-Sozialisten and Elizabeth Foerster-Nietzsche twisted this great writers work to fit their own Nazi agenda as if,In fact,Nietzsche was merely a severe critic of Christendom and not,rather,a passionate and obtuse Classicist.

Nietzsche discusses in depth,The disastrous consequences for European civilisation,Of trying to schizophrenically encompass two ancient competitive consciences,The Pagan and the Biblical in our culture and in each mind and does so brilliantly-He was a Thinker and any Thinkers thoughts,Put into practise become real policy just as Yeshua Ha Notsri's inclusive,Humane theory did,As,For instance,In the consequences of the Catholic or Communist hegemonies and of their respective genocides,For which there have been neither recognition nor compensation and which were as horrendous as the bloodbaths of the Roman arena.

Nietzsche was all too honest and was absolutely far more a Fascist in instinct for that reason,Than both his predictable opponents and than those who try to read him neutrally today or even to reclaim him philosophically but that is still not the same thing as proving him a Nazi-Sozi any more than one can prove that Stalinism is the same thing as Trotskiism because both were Communists-It's best to just read the Man and this book is a lightweightish start.

Nietzsche offers us a choice not to follow state monotheism and its soulless materialism and he does so in a witty and cheeky style whose originality is also in its accessible informality.

What Nietszche was not,was merely a parochial chauvinist,thus his respect for Jewry but he was a conscious European partly through his distinct Francophilia and in his admiration of Napoleon and in this lies his prescriptive excellence as a philosophist,for it's fairly obvious he had little time for the Anglophone Commonwealth and its worldwide Masonic web-A great book,And like most of his books,One for all true ethnic Europeans of all natural nationalities,Even and especially todays beknighted Russians-Umwertung Alle Werte,Ivan,Auch fuer Russland.
Also sprach ZarathustraThe Gay Science, with a prelude in rhymes and an appendix of songs. Translated, with commentary , by Walter Kaufmann Twilight of Idols and Anti-Christ (Penguin Classics)
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Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One is (Penguin Classics)
Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One is (Penguin Classics) by Friedrich Nietzsche (Paperback - 26 Nov 1992)
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