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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nice translation, 11 Mar. 2012
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This review is from: De Anima (On the Soul) (Classics) (Paperback)
The Philosopher's work "De Anima" is never easy reading but this translation with its introduction, glossary and general notes makes a difficult task easier. I found the English to be readable and each chapter with its own mini introduction helped me greatly. I had to buy this text for anthorpology but if you need or want to read "De Anima" I would recommend this edition.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good - but...., 12 Jan. 2015
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Paul Marks - See all my reviews
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This review is from: De Anima (On the Soul) (Classics) (Paperback)
This seems to be a good translation - but the author is rather obsessed with giving the world his own opinions, the introduction and notes in this work are vastly longer than the sections of the work that are actually by Aristotle.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Aristotle a spitfire?, 27 July 2013
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This review is from: De Anima (On the Soul) (Classics) (Paperback)
I just read customers reviews on this book and they seduced me to believe that the hesitation that Aristotle had about the learnings of his former teachers (i.e. Plato) was driven by a preconception wich he would perhaps evenly by force make true. I think this is not true. Aristotle was 20 years the companion of Plato. In modern concepts (i.e. an academic study) this seems a lifetime. I think it is. Aristotle became Plato and then he disagreed. He found himself and all his work were the results of this. Plato himself described the alienation of Aristotle as the kicks that a young ass gives to his mother when it becomes mature. And he didn't bother about it. That Aristotle was absolutly different from Plato reveals the end of his live. He then came to the conclusion that looking at the work he had done, it only made him cold and lonesome. But he did not return to the works of Plato wich perhaps are better. No, he did not return to Plate but he turned to the myths. And he acknowledge that in his live his wondering allover had brought him a better understanding of the myths. And he was happy with them. One critic of him suggest that Aristotle has been throughout his whole live a religious man. This is very daring and the last word is not been said.
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4 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars classic, 3 Sept. 2009
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Evangelia Voutsaki "evavou" (Brighton, UK-Chania, Greece) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: De Anima (On the Soul) (Classics) (Paperback)
well, is it all Greek to you?
Aristotle's De Anima will make you want to learn more about everything... A classic philosopher whose illuminative thought is extremely fresh!
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De Anima (On the Soul) (Classics)
De Anima (On the Soul) (Classics) by Aristotle (Paperback - 29 Jan. 1987)
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