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31 Reviews
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't Castaway
I expected Robinson Crusoe to be mostly the long philosophical reflections of an isolated man and was very surprised by how much happens. There are pirates, cannibals, plantations and bears. Robinson spends only around half the book on his famous island and even then we read about his adventures at farming, hunting, pottery etc.

The book is not simply an...
Published 22 months ago by Adam Clarke

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3.0 out of 5 stars I enjoyed Going back to school
Robinson Crusoe was a book we had to read at school, I enjoyed it then and I enjoyed even more this time
Published 6 months ago by Mandy


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4.0 out of 5 stars happy to read again, 4 Mar 2014
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Ali_M. (Newcastle Upon Tyne) - See all my reviews
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I last read this book over forty years ago, I have just finished reading it again and thoroughly enjoyed it. It's a tale of boys own stuff, I feel that it's a book everyone should read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Robinson Crusoe (Penguin Popular Classics) Daniel Defoe, 25 Nov 2013
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Chris Brown "C J M Brown" (Mount Victoria, Wellington, New Zealand) - See all my reviews
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I last read this about 50 years ago and saw an adaptation of it on TV a couple years ago and felt I would like to read the novel again and I think I enjoyed it even more than when I read it all that time ago.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing edition, not as pictured, 22 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Robinson Crusoe (Paperback)
The book received was a different cover, much duller with no illustrations which may have been in the hardback version only. Content and condition was OK for a secondhand book
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5.0 out of 5 stars Timely arrival and in good condition, 8 Sep 2013
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It is an excellent read being an adventure story and insight into the late seventeenth century. Defoe is an excellent novellist
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fine Publication from Arcturus, 12 Jun 2010
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M. Brennan (Cookstown,, Tyrone. Northern Ireland) - See all my reviews
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Arcturus Classic Publications has produced one of the better budget priced paperback versions of this classic by Daniel Defoe.This copy contains illustrations by George Cruikshank from the 1831 edition (Shakespeare Press). Highly recommended
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4.0 out of 5 stars Almost got lost in the story, 21 Aug 2009
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I. Purchase "Ian" (UK) - See all my reviews
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I liked this story and the element of it being original. You almost get lost in the island life of survival. It easy to follow and I would recommend it for a holiday book.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An island paradise, 19 Aug 2008
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Melmoth (London, England) - See all my reviews
We all know about Robinson Crusoe, or at least we think we do. We know about the shipwreck and the years alone on the island and the footprint in the sand and "Man Friday".

Reading the book for the first time, after years of receiving it via the TV and the cinema, in heavily abridged or heavily revised versions, I was amazed to discover how much more there is to find.

The first joy is Defoe's prose, written with all the urgency and precision of a lifelong pamphleteer. Defoe never leaves any doubt as to what his character is trying to say or why he is trying to say it.
The second joy is the pacing. In the brief sections before and after his time on the island, Crusoe undergoes multiple shipwrecks, capture by pirates, escape from slavery, the life of a Brazilian plantation owner, the putting down of a mutiny and even an attack by wolves. Any one of these events could serve quite happily as the climax of another story. As it is, the only time the pace slows is during Crusoe's sojourn on the island and that is only appropriate to his condition.

The greatest joy of the book, though, is Crusoe himself. This is a very real character with very real failings. He is frequently arrogant, unthinking or even plain stupid but wins us over with the good grace with which he admits his faults. One minute he is praising the quality of his newly baked pots, the next laughing at himself for spending months on building a canoe too large and too far from shore for him ever to be able to drag it to the sea. All the while he struggles to give some meaning to his isolation, a meaning he chooses to find in his own vision of God (a God that, by remarkable coincidence, exactly mirrors Defoe's own, nonconformist vision of his Almighty). It's not an endeavour of which Richard Dawkins - or indeed I - would necessarily approve but it's certainly one appropriate to Crusoe's time and personality.

Robinson Crusoe has been analysed as a prototypical text of British imperialism, a moral text, a religious text and even a Marxist text. It has drawn the attention of Rousseau, Wilkie Collins, Coetzee and Joyce among thousands of others. Having read it, one suddenly sees why. The only thing it lacks is the wonderful theme music from the 1960s TV series.
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13 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Long winded but interesting from a humanitarian viewpoint, 23 Nov 2000
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Mrs. K. A. Wheatley "katywheatley" (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
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I found this book really dragged. Crusoe never really has any exciting adventures until way into the book. For the first two or three hundred pages it's mostly an account of goat husbandry and the difficulties of making ink and paper etc. It hots up when he rescues Man Friday from some cannibals and their relationship is interesting and compelling. Crusoe is forced to be open minded because he has noone else around except his parrot. He is able to understand the dignity of the "savage" and look upon him eventually as an equal in some ways although still a servant. I liked the fact that it questions our relationship with those we feel are beneath us in whatever way.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Traditional and factual. Hard to complete comapared to modern novels, 23 Jun 2007
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Robinson Crusoe is claimed to be one of the first novel's written in English (1719) and is a fictional autobiography of a man who is from a very average family in England at that time. The story moves from the main characters moving out of his family home and travelling the seas to his eventual shipwreck off the American coast.

I read this book over an extended period of time due to exams in School but also because they book is very laborious with a completely different style of writing to contemporary writers. At times it is written very factually that reminded me of a non-fiction book such as the treatment of certain animals and how to tame them.

For looking into how literature started and an abstract insight into general life in these times, the first part of the book, the story can be of relevance and provide enough stimulation to finish. Also as many reviewers have mentioned before the novel is also allegorical with the classic shipwrecked story on one level and the deep insight into humanity and how humans behave on the other. Despite some believing that this second level of thought provides more entertainment to the story and makes the book worth reading I personally did not find that stimulating.

However despite its downfalls I still believe Robinson Crusoe to be worth reading for its literature value (as in what the book did for literature, moving it along etc), but it also captures the practical issues with being stuck on a desert island very well. If looking for a page-turner I wouldn't advise this book but the storyline is still appealing.

Other links: Defoe went on to write a lesser known sequel: The further adventures of Robinson Crusoe.

Film: Castaway
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 23 Sep 2014
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Excellent condition book and a fabulous read
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Robinson Crusoe
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe (Hardcover - 6 Dec 2001)
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