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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful
It took me a long time to bring myself to read this book because I just couldn't imagine life without Glencora Palliser, yet Trollope pulls it off masterfully. His focus now shifts to Plantaganet's world entirely and shows how he is forced to radically change his stance on life if he is to survive without his wife. It is interesting to see how much Glencora is made...
Published on 8 Jan 2001 by Mrs. K. A. Wheatley

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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, 8 Jan 2001
By 
Mrs. K. A. Wheatley "katywheatley" (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Duke's Children (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
It took me a long time to bring myself to read this book because I just couldn't imagine life without Glencora Palliser, yet Trollope pulls it off masterfully. His focus now shifts to Plantaganet's world entirely and shows how he is forced to radically change his stance on life if he is to survive without his wife. It is interesting to see how much Glencora is made almost more real by her absence, the fact that she is no longer around to shield and protect her husband shows how much she did achieve. Palliser's mainstay has now been taken away from him and his children are about to disobey him in the most cutting way by marrying the wrong people. It is in this novel, right at the end of his life that Palliser actually does all his growing up and awakens to the shock of a hugely different world than he had safely imagined cocooned away with his parliamentary procedures. A radical novel, yet told, as ever with beautiful humour and real insight into people and politics. A masterpiece.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sensitive, wry and thoroughly entertaining, 25 July 2007
This review is from: The Duke's Children (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
In this, the sixth and final Palliser novel, the brilliant but emotionally stunted Duke of Omnium is left by the death of his wife Glencora to deal with the marriages of his three grown-up children. Two fall for partners who the Duke feels are inappropriate; and the battle of wills begins. The resolution is delightfully realistic; the struggles on the way are moving and powerfully described. I found the book wonderful, despite the death at the beginning of Glencora, surely (with Madame Max Goesler) one of the most intriguing characters in the series.

I enjoyed the Palliser series enormously. The books are entertaining, suffused with a dry humour which becomes irresistible on close acquaintaince and filled with wisdom not only about the politics for which Trollope is famous but also about relations between the sexes. I've reviewed all of them; for my money the best is "Can You Forgive Her" (all you ever needed to know about men and women), which also by good fortune is the first, so you can read it to see if you fancy the rest. I enjoyed "The Eustace Diamonds", "Phineas Finn"; and "The Duke's Children" immensely too, and "Phineas Redux and "The Prime Minister" somewhat less (these two focus less on relationships and more on politics, so others may disagree). But if you have a couple of months spare to enter a world of fascinating characters, love, passion and politics, read the lot! You won't regret it.

Summary: a fitting end to an epic series.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful end to a great series, 4 Oct 2008
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Didier (Ghent, Belgium) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Duke's Children (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
'The Duke's Children' is the last (sixth) part of the Palliser-novels by Anthony Trollope, and he begins it abruptly: by the end of the first sentence of the first chapter Lady Glencora Palliser (who figured so charmingly in all other novels of the series), is dead...

This leaves Plantagenet Palliser, Duke of Omnium, not only utterly bereaved as he loved his wife dearly, but also makes him sole responsible for their three children: Lord Silverbridge (the eldest son), Lady Mary (only daughter), and Lord Gerald (the second son). Before long the Duke is confronted with problems by each of his children: Lord Silverbridge takes to betting and horse-racing and then falls in love with an American girl, Lady Mary falls in love with a respectable but penniless gentleman, and Lord Gerald gets kicked out of university! Worst of all, the Duke, who was never the most social and convivial of men (to put it mildly), finds himself unable to discuss matters openly and frankly with his children. At the core of the novel lies a deceivingly simple dilemma for the Duke: can he, who has been a Liberal politician all his life and has striven to reduce the gap (not to say gulf) between the classes, square it with his conscience to forbid his children to marry 'beneath their class'?

As always, Trollope describes in his typical easy style the various thoughts and feelings of the principal characters in great detail, and he does so without ever getting boring. And, contrary to some of his other novels, all principal characters are extremely 'likeable' people: they have their faults for sure, but you cannot help but sympathize with both the Duke in his desperate struggle to be a good father, and his children in their justified 'revolt' against what they feel to be matters in which they, as adults, should decide for themselves. In the end it's crystal clear (at least to us as readers) that they all love each other dearly and you cannot escape hoping that things will work out allright in the end.

Some of the earlier novels in the series are quite gloomy, but this one is truly optimistic in showing that, despite differences of opinion, parents and children can still love and respect each other. I loved all Palliser-novels, but this is surely one of the best. A worthy end to a great series!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Go For It, 14 Feb 2014
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I have read a number of Trollope 's novels,but I think this is one of the best.The tensions between generations are shown to be as real and difficult to resolve as they are today. The characters are well drawn and act consistently throughout.For those interested in social history the backcloth of areas like Politics and horse racing is fascinating. a great read!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Trollope at his classic best, 20 Nov 2013
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F. M. M. Stott (Devizes, Wiltshire) - See all my reviews
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Trollope is the author I turn to when I know I'll have a wonderful read and won't be disppointed, and this novel is no exception.

In The Duke's Children, the story takes place in the aftermath of Lady Glencora's death, when her husband, the Duke, is struggling with his own grief and the difficulties of being a single parent parents, albeit one with grown-up children. His sons manage to get through what even nowadays would be an astonishing amount of money (£70,000 on one occasion, on a horse), and both his heir, Lord Silverbridge, and his beloved daughter, Lady Mary, fall for people whom their father considers unsuitable. The poor duke has a lot to learn, and tries to do the right thing, while his children continue to disappoint and perplex him.

There is in this novel the usual mix of sympathetic characters, love, hearbreak, gambling, foxhunting, humour, at least one wonderful villain, and a touch of politics; everything, in fact, that makes for a classic Trollope story. In the course of the novel, lessons are learned, and attitudes are changed. The only surprise is that one of the main characters ends up without a spouse, and I was sad about this. But otherwise, an entirely satisfactory novel.

Highly recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Omnium Gatherum, 18 April 2013
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Panjandrum (St Albans, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Duke's Children (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
Trollope's final Palliser novel is heavily indebted to Shakespeare's Henry IV Part I in its main plot of the elderly, widowed father disappointed by the profligacy of the son who stands to inherit all his wealth and status. As with its Shakespearean model, this novel briliantly illustrates the path to knowledge of the son, Lord Silverbridge as he struggles to throw off the follies of his youth. There are the brilliant scenes of the racing industry which stand for the Boar's tavern, where Silverbridge's partner, Major Tifto,stands in loco parentis as Falstaff does for Prince Hal.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Last but not least, 9 Feb 2013
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The Palliser novels are excellent examples of Trollope's work, with good descriptions of 19th century life, politics, morals and romance.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A worthy end, 30 Jan 2013
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After all the Palliser adventures we almost feel part of that August family, but we miss the Duchess as much as her widower does. The eponymous children are indeed more like their mother than their father, though the daughter has his steely resolve.

I shall miss the Pallisers, and the Finns - I have been on a long emotional journey with them. The ending seemed abrupt - but since I had to say goodbye, perhaps it was less painful that way.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Anthony Trollope, 20 Jan 2013
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This review is from: The Duke's Children (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
It's Anthony Trollope - what more is there that needs to be said? A great writer who deserves a much wider audience.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Book by Anthony Trollope, 19 Jan 2013
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I am gradually reading my way through all of Anthony Trollope books and the fact that Amazon has made this free for the Kindle very much helps.
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The Duke's Children (Penguin Classics)
The Duke's Children (Penguin Classics) by Anthony Trollope (Paperback - 27 July 1995)
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