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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 3 January 2014
I bought this for my niece for Christmas and she hasn't be able to put it down. I read it myself quite a while ago and will also buy this for my daughter in the next few years. A must for any young girl!
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on 8 March 2002
A wonderful book that I have enjoyed many times over the years. It is substantially better than the ones that follow it. When I first read it as a child I really wanted 'something similar'. So for anyone else who feels the same way, may I recommend a few books for adults/young adults by the children's writer Dianna Wynne-Jones? Deep Secret and a Sudden Wild Magic both have very similar qualities and the Year of the Griffin is suitable for younger readers and has always for some reason made me think of this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 15 March 2015
Beautifully written and enjoyable. It's sci-fi, but if you like The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, you'll probably like this. Good for confident readers, 10 years+
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I'd not read this before, which is quite surprising as it would have been right up my street when I was the right age for it!
But, what a great book.
Even more so when you consider when it was written. There's not much to add to the myriad of reviews already commending it, other than I still enjoyed it despite being 48 at my first read of it. I just wish I'd've known about it when I was in my early teens.
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on 11 June 2014
I enjoyed reading this story- not least because I read other books by Madeleine L'Engle when I was a child and therefore knew what kind of story to expect. A Wrinkle in Time is a bit different, as it blends 1960's American 'slice of life' with fantasy. I liked the happy ending and overtly Christian theme. Some readers today might find the content and style a little 'cheesy' and predictable, but I'm ok with that.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 10 September 2012
I am now in the middle of the first sequel to this book, going through the Time Quartet (don't understand why it isn't called the TIME QUINTET, the only logic I can come up with is AN ACCEPTABLE TIME deals with Polly and not one of the four Murry children) for the first time. A WRINKLE IN TIME is one of those books that have a sterling reputation, and a book I had been meaning to read for a long time. It was worth the wait, being one of the most memorable and unusual books I've read. For you old school gamers, perhaps Mother Brain off Metroid came from the villain here? Just a thought.

The story is tightly written, very good buildup of characters, dominant themes very apparent (acceptance, curiosity, and very importantly: love), plausible resolution. All the characters are very memorable, people you would love to meet in real life. Charles Wallace is one of the most intriguing of all characters I have met in literature, and it's a shame we don't get to see more of the REAL C. W. (to those of you who have read the book you know what I mean). The images and story are so diverse, so far reaching I consumed the story rather quickly. To those of you familiar with C. S. Lewis, he said one of the purposes of literature, and primarily myth, is to give you `stabs of joy', awaken a spiritually yearning that ultimately is consummated in the character of Christ Jesus. This book is myth. I wanted to go to the land of the centaurs and bask in that glory. This story awakens a longing and a yearning for things of the supernatural. It certainly did for me.

I would end it at that, but I do have some issues or problems with this book. One largely rests in the fact that the three Mrs. Ws are maintaining the illusion of haunting and witchcraft to scare away people. No angles of God would do this, as described in the book, for "a joke" (its in the passage where Meg is attempting to help Charles Wallace at Camazots). I do not object to magic in literature depending on how it is handled. But I do object to this simply because they are painted as such wonderful servants of God, and there's the whole feel to the book of goodness and holiness, and then this element which for me goes completely against everything L'Engle otherwise consistently maintains in this work.

Another is the inclusion of The Happy Medium. Medium is generally associated with sorcery and evil, and wish she had chosen a better title for her than this.

Yet another is the feeling of universalism that predominates a particular passage in the book where Charles Wallace is describing the heroes who have fought against the encroaching darkness. One is Jesus. Since the book plays with the time element extensively, L'Engle should have said the Jesus won the battle already, even though we must fight it. This I do not hold against L'Engle, simply because the doctrine is complex and very difficult to understand, but I do resent the inclusion of Buddha as one of the people who have fought against the darkness, which, oddly, is included a few lines down with a lists of artists. My own thoughts on universalism are clouded (no, I do not believe full-blown universalism: the one I waiver back and forth with is found in THE LAST BATTLE). But Buddhism is a false religion, and he did not fight the darkness, although he had been deceived into thinking he had.

While, for me, those things I've cited above do detract from this book, the story is wonderful, and one of the most remarkable books I've read. You will be changed by this book if you allow yourself to be. It's such an unusual book. I just soaked it up. Well done, L'Engle.

Another impression I have of L'Engle, and which she herself supports, she has a very large curiosity about the world. There's a definite shift from NARNIA to WRINKLE. With Lewis you feel like he's an uncle telling you this wonderful story, but he's wise. With L'Engle, you get the feeling she's just as amazed at this world that's been uncovered as you are. In an interview with L'Engle here on Amazon, she said Lewis had a lot more answers, and she had a lot more questions. Lets see what she can turn up.

Mike London

(P. S. Have you seen those dreadful illustrations, the cover art, to the other paperback edition? That edition has the three children standing in an egg-shaped circle with a white creature flying over. They are much to young looking for this book - I don't like the cover art at all on those. I much prefer the one with the centaur on the cover or the hardback edition).
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
When a strange old lady turns up at your house and tells you random facts about five-dimensional space, you should probably call the police.

Fortunately, that does not happen in "A Wrinkle In Time," where reality can twist and bend, and strange worlds are just a tesseract away. Madeleine L'Engle's classic sci-fantasy is many things -- a coming-of-age tale, a rescue quest, a clash between good and evil -- spun with rich, luminous prose and eerie alien worlds.

On a stormy night, the strange Mrs. Whatsit takes shelter in the Murray household, and informs Mrs. Murray that "there is such a thing as a tesseract." Teenage Meg Murray suspects that that the tesseract has something to do with her father's mysterious disappearance. So she, her little brother Charles Wallace and her classmate Calvin go off to get more answers from Mrs. Whatsit and her pals, Mrs. Who and Mrs. Which.

The three old woman soon whisk the kids off on a journey through time and space, to worlds and creatures that are utterly alien to them. But it turns out that Mr. Murray has not merely become lost on an alien world -- he has been ensnared by an evil intelligence that threatens them all. To save her family -- not to mention the entire universe -- Meg will have to face the most horrifying threat of all.

"A Wrinkle in Time" is a book that defies easy classification -- it isn't typical fantasy or sci-fi, it's a CHILDREN'S novel that integrates physics and philosophy into the story, and it's rife with religious symbolism. L'Engle also had a truly sublime writing style -- she wrote in a rich, almost sensual style with lots of little details that make you feel like you are actually THERE.

And L'Engle had the rare talent for making you feel like the universe is a vast, strange place filled with wonders and terrors, which are physically bizarre but spiritually familiar to us. This is a story where you can be instantly swept from our planet to a dark world filled with four-armed eyeless yetis, or a grey planet of perfect order, and somehow it feels wholly real.

And while the characters sound like stereotypes -- the weird old ladies, the plain girl, the child genius, the popular boy -- they really aren't. Meg seems kind of whiny and wangsty at first, but once the kids get swept up in their quest she gets to show her inner strength at last. Charles Wallace doesn't bug me as most child geniuses do, and Calvin serves as the "normal" one who serves as a source of strength. And the Mrs. W's are absolutely delightful -- eccentric, kindly and utterly mysterious.

"A Wrinkle in Time" is one of those rare books that can change the way you see the universe -- and it's a friggin' good read too. A richly imagined, exquisitely written story.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 29 October 1998
One of those classic children's books that remains readable when you grow up, this is a fantasy that despite the modern language and situations has an almost Victorian feel. Wonderful stuff - I can't understand why this is in the top 10 of banned children's books in the US.
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on 5 March 2014
I had to read this book for work and could not have been more disappointed. This is supposed to be a 'classic' children's book; it won many awards. The writing is poor, the structure extraordinarily sloppy, the characters cardboard and the ideology dubious.
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on 16 August 2015
I've lost count of the number of times I've read this book. Stylistically I don't think the writing has survived the passage of time as well as some books have, but nevertheless, the story and the themes are timeless. Essential reading for all children.
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