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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars magical
I first read this as a young girl, many moons ago. If anything, this is even more charming a tale than 101 Dalmatians. Mystical, magical and just the thing to curl up with beside a cosy fire in the weeks running up to Christmas. Truly spellbinding.
Published on 23 Sept. 2009 by Ticked Off

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3.0 out of 5 stars the starlight barking
This story was well thought out and the concept quite clever but it wasn't my cup of tea young children with their first readings may find it quaint and funny but I had no real feeling for the story line.
Published on 14 Feb. 2013 by Amazon Customer


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars magical, 23 Sept. 2009
I first read this as a young girl, many moons ago. If anything, this is even more charming a tale than 101 Dalmatians. Mystical, magical and just the thing to curl up with beside a cosy fire in the weeks running up to Christmas. Truly spellbinding.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The REAL sequel to 101 Dalmations, 14 Nov. 2002
By 
Em "em" (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Starlight Barking (Puffin Books) (Paperback)
Forget the sickly treacle of Disney's 102 Dalmations. This is the real sequel and from the moment you start reading it feels like you are in a marvellous dream.
Pongo and Mrs are living with their extended family of puppies (their owners always keep at least 101 living with them), when one morning, only the dogs wake up. It seems that there is something rather strange happening. The dogs have extraordinary powers including the ability to float rather then run, and they find that these powers have been given to them by Sirius, God of all dogs who lives on the Dogstar. Do they want to join him and live a wonderful doggy life, or stay here with their "owners"?
This book could be considered by some as too far fetched to be enjoyable, but to me it is it's sheer fantasy that makes this such a wonderful read. Cruella de Vil makes a brief appearance, but as she is asleep at the time she doesnt really hold her former terror!
I would recommend this book to anyone, but particularly to anyone who likes to read stories to their children. This is the perfect bedtime read for any child, I had it read to me and I have read it to my own children. It is worth the effort to find a copy.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book, 28 Jun. 2003
By 
P. Knights - See all my reviews
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I read this book the first time as a very young boy, before I read 101 Dalmations and I think even before I had seen the Disney animated film. I remember been enraptured by the novel and having recently read the book again (at the grand old age of 28) it had lost non of its magic.
I also came to a conclusion, this book gave me my love of science fiction. Really this book is childrens sci-fi, while it is easily devoured by children it also raises so interesting questions about concepts of time and the perception of time. So many authors underestimate children, this book doesn't and while it can be taken as a normal childrens book about some dogs it can also unlock a love of a genre that has lasted a lifetime in my case.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The dog days dawn with a vengeance, 1 Jan. 2006
By 
Michele L. Worley (Kingdom of the Mouse, United States) - See all my reviews
This sequel to THE 101 DALMATIANS is somewhat different from its predecessor. In THE 101 DALMATIANS, the dogs (give or take their varying talents for understanding human speech and even writing) had the limitations of real dogs - they had a great deal of difficulty in communicating complicated ideas to humans, they were hampered by the lack of hands to open doors, and so on. In other words, while the first book had dogs who understood everything that was going on, it wasn't exactly a fantasy.
Here, the first thing that happens on the fine summer day on which the story begins, when Pongo and Missis wake in their human pets' room at Hell Hall, is that they begin learning that a lot of their normal limitations have mysteriously vanished. None of the dogs are hungry (amazing in itself with so many young mothers and puppies on the premises), doors and gates mysteriously open whenever the dogs need to get into or out of a place, and they can move much faster than usual. But these changes are accompanied by frightening events - the Dearlys and even the Persian cats are sleeping normally and even smiling in their sleep, but will not wake.
Pongo meets with the General (formerly a Colonel), who as a working sheepdog on a nearby farm is very practiced at organization and strategy, to find that the unbreakable sleep seems to have affected *all* living creatures other than dogs. They are soon contacted by Cadpig, the youngest of the Pongos' first litter, who alone chose to get a pet of her own - by tagging along on one of Mr. Dearly's consultations with the government to help deal with the national debt, she got her dearest wish of being on television by becoming the Prime Minister's pet. That in itself is a good story - the poor man was so touched by her display of obvious affection for him when most people had nothing nice to say about him that he was glad to have her. She improved his approval ratings so much that most high-ranking government officials followed suit and got dogs - and now those dogs are acting in place of their sleeping humans to direct the country, so that Cadpig is acting as Prime Minister and trying to keep all the dogs calm and figure out what's going on - and she asks her father to join her in London as an adviser. (Her mother, unasked, also gives her some sound advice - while Missis may not be as intellectual as Pongo, she has good sense and good instincts, while Cadpig is so bossy that she goes overboard at trying to organize things.)
The core cast of THE 101 DALMATIANS quickly reassembles, as Prince and Perdita are left to look after the Dearlys and the Pongos take their now-grown first litter with them to London. (It's a pity that Prince isn't much developed as a character, but Perdita's homelessness in early youth left its mark, and leaving the two of them at Hell Hall makes the cast in this book track that of the previous book more closely.) The cats from the first book and even young Tommy, the General's particular pet human, eventually wake up and join in, although all the other creatures remain asleep - this is put down to their having been made honorary dogs. (Tommy is particularly interested - although he's still very young, he's greatly interested in science fiction.)
About three quarters of the book is spent travelling through this world effectively populated only by dogs - dealing with traffic problems in London as so many dogs try to get around (even when they can effectively fly, the crowding causes problems) and watching the canine cabinet trying to get a grip on the crisis. (This is a particularly nice bit of irony, as none of the dogs or even their humans have been in danger, even though strange things have been going on.) Only in the last quarter of the book are the dogs made aware of *why* these things have been happening to them, and given a choice about deciding what kind of a world they really want to live in and where their loyalties lie.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Starlight barking, 15 Jan. 2013
By 
Clare O'Beara - See all my reviews
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The dog heroes of 101 Dalmatians are back in this good sequel. If you haven't read the first book, it isn't necessary except to explain why there are so many of one breed of dog living in one place, and to introduce the characters.
In this tale the dogs in London wake up to find that humans, cats and other creatures are all sleeping peacefully and can't be woken but doors just open, other dogs are running floatily about and nobody is hungry. The dogs communicate normally by Twilight Barking and in this they realise that it is the Dog Days of summer, when Sirius the Dog Star is visible, so that is the cause of the title Starlight Barking. Dogs accumulate in Downing Street where Pongo and Missis find their daughter Cadpig was adopted by the Prime Minister and consequently is now supposed by dogs to be running the country. She is entertaining gentledogs from all over and doesn't know any more than they do.
Sirius then brings a message for all dogs on earth.
This is a definite fantasy or SF book which even at the time I knew was not in line with natural dog behaviour.
This can be bought as a duet with the original tale.

Readers of the right age may also enjoy 'A Dog So Small' by Phillipa Pearce, a more serious tale of a boy in London who wishes for a dog.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant book!!!, 10 Aug. 2013
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Absolutely breathtaking. Quite short but very sweet! Pinto and Missus on another adventure were they can swoosh! You can't stop reading it until you've finished.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Amazing!, 6 Oct. 2013
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I Enjoyed it a lot I would recommend it for kids my daughter Molly loves this book and I think your kids would too
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You'd be barking to miss this wonderful story!, 2 Nov. 2012
By 
C. Stewart "The Cat's Whiskers" (Yorkshire/Nottinghamshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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My parents taught me literacy and numeracy at the age of 3, before I started school at 4-5, I therefore had a head start over other primary school children and my teachers a) appreciated a little girl who could be left unsupervised if you gave her something to read and b) rapidly started running out of books in the school for me! Since my reading age was about double my biological age, this did occasionally lead to some mis-matches (I read Lady Chatterley's Lover at nine and didn't really see what all the fuss was about at the time!). However, 101 Dalmatians wasn't one of them - I loved the story.
Ironically it was exactly because the liberal bigotry of Political Correctness was starving British school libraries of funds to renew stock that - horror - might actually impart knowledge to children and fire their imaginations and ability to think for themselves that I encountered many wonderful books, such as Nicholas Stuart Gray's Over The Hills to Fabylon, the first edition of Harry Harrison's The Stainless Steel Rat, and of course, the obscure, woefully sidelined sequel to The 101 Dalmatians, which our school library had as a battered hardback that had been purchased not long after it was originally published! To be honest, I have always liked The Starlight Barking better than The 101 Dalmatians. As another reviewer has said, the book is actually a nice little sci-fi story for children about the nature of time, time-travel, etc., written long before Doctor Who was invented and, frankly, quite a lot better than some of the modern Time Lord's distasteful soft-porn masquerading as sci-fi stuff.
But the book has always been incredibly difficult to get hold off - unlike the first book. I think it is a great shame the sequel has never been made into a film or even a TV series, as it cries out for it. However, the same is true of lots of great sci-fi or fantasy works just begging to be televised or filmed (I'd like to qualify that by saying by someone who knows what they are doing and who loves the books, as everyone who's ever gone near my favourite book The Lost World by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle has made a hash of it) - Diana Wynne Jones' Howls Moving Castle and Castle in the Air, Barry Hughart's Master Li Triology, David Eddings Belgariad - to name but three.
Above all, this book is now on Kindle! I am distraught at having to destroy my long-established book collection due to a paper mite infestation and now The Starlight Barking is on Kindle, I can have it to hand always!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars gorgeous childrens classic, 11 Oct. 2009
By 
shell (north-east england) - See all my reviews
the sequel to the one hundred and one dalmations and another superb book by dodie smith. i recommend it for adults and children alike!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The starlight barking review, 20 May 2003
By 
Rachel Powell (Hertfordshire, England) - See all my reviews
This is the sequel to the hundred and one dalmatians. it is advisable to read this first. IT is about Pongo and Mississ' new and latest adventure. The whole of London - no the world! has gone to a deep unawakable sleep apart from the dogs. It's Pongo and lucky's job to save the world!
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The Starlight Barking (Puffin Books)
The Starlight Barking (Puffin Books) by Dodie Smith (Paperback - Mar. 1970)
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