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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars19
4.1 out of 5 stars
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on 20 August 2006
"The Law Machine" by Marcel Berlins and Clare Dyer, is an introductory book regarding the law, which is an intrinsic part of a nation. Without having any prior legal knowledge of English legal system whatsoever, it gave me good groundings upon the everchanging respective field. For that reason, the book that is to be considered must be fully updated- that actually it was. Basically, inspired by a television programme, it explains The Criminal and Civil process of law, using the case portrayed in the television. The author explicitly enunciates the judicial hierarchy, and then goes on to describes the lawyers. The author has honestly touched every part of law from confused and struggling novice barristers to well-paid solicitors, and the dominancy of barristers in the judiciary. This was the first book I used for an introductory reading and it acquainted me with much of basic knowledge that I was lacking and most of my questions have been answered. The language used by the authors is generally simple, though the book sometimes seems to be a bit turgid. Nonetheless, the reason for which I bought the book, that is to gain an acquaintanceship with the English Legal System has been, without a doubt, been fulfilled. To be succinct, its a reliable introductory law book.
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on 28 April 2001
Few writers manage accurately guide the reader through the maze that is the English Legal System. Perhaps, even fewer manage to present it in the logical and comprehensible manner that most, new, law students require. The Law Machine offers a complete overview of the English Legal System from the frontline Citizens Advice Bureaux to highest, domestic court, the House of Lords, It provides detailed factual information and well-reasoned critique of the issues and problems, that are continually moulding the development of our legal system. For me, the Law Machine's strength lies in the fact that unlike so many legal textbooks its not wholly rooted in the past. The Law machine looks to the future, to introduction of a Criminal Defence Service, the increasingly unsustainable split legal professions and the recent incorporation of the European Convention of Human Rights. In essence, it is a book that is an invaluable introduction to the English Legal System, well-suited to students of A-Level law and law degree undergradutes. There's hope out there for all us law students and it begins here.
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on 11 November 2005
This is not a book for the advanced law student but why would they want it anyway. For those taking an A level or starting on a degree course it gives an excellent initial guide to the legal maze and will make further studies much easier. Its layout takes you through legal and civil case scenarios in a virtual story book form.Its a fairly east way to assimilate the basics of the English Legal System and I would definitely encourage the beginer to read it
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on 10 September 2010
Studying law at university is a daunting experience in itself let alone trying to get your head around the actual revision.

I purchased this book as I had to cover Legal Method and Skills as a module in my first year @ uni. This was a great reference point, to read over before certain lectures/seminars it helps reinstate what lecturers had been saying.

If you're in your first year of uni studying law, this is a really nice introduction into the world of the English Legal System which will form the foundation of your legal career.
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on 16 February 2014
The book could do with another update to revise the changes particularly in regard to legal aid which has now been severely curtailed, direct access to barristers by members of the public and the introduction of the supreme court.

To it's credit the fundamental issues of justice it raises remain essentially the same and they are clearly and well presented.
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on 23 April 2015
This is a very useful book on the machinery of justice and how the English Legal System works. I'd recomend this as a useful introductory text to all English Legal System/Legal Process students in the first year of their law degree. It is by no means comprehensive, but it's aim is to give a good foundation and explain things clearly, and it does do that very well.
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on 28 April 2001
Few writers manage accurately guide the reader through the maze that is the English Legal System. Perhaps, even fewer manage to present it in the logical and comprehensible manner that most, new, law students require. The Law Machine offers a complete overview of the English Legal System from the frontline Citizens Advice Bureaux to highest, domestic court, the House of Lords, It provides detailed factual information and well-reasoned critique of the issues and problems, that are continually moulding the development of our legal system. For me, the Law Machine's strength lies in the fact that unlike so many legal textbooks its not wholly rooted in the past. The Law machine looks to the future, to introduction of a Criminal Defence Service, the increasingly unsustainable split legal professions and the recent incorporation of the European Convention of Human Rights. In essence, it is a book that is an invaluable introduction to the English Legal System, well-suited to students of A-Level law and law degree undergradutes. There's hope out there for all us law students and it begins here.
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on 5 February 2014
It's all there... I now understand items on the news, not just in general, but in great detail, kind of spooky really. A good read for someone who wants a broad overview of the criminal justice system.
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on 10 June 2007
After reading this book, I question how my ignorance regarding the law had managed to be so far-reaching! If you are looking for an in-depth discussion of the development of, and current, legal situation, this is not the book for you. By its own admission, it is intended purely as an introduction with aspects of development and explanation thrown in - but this is not a weakness of the book by any means. As a prospective law student, this book allowed me to begin to enter the world of the law, with all its manifest profundities and absurd historic quirks, and it is a world I look forward to learning more about.

I would recommend this book for anyone interested in how our society functions or for anyone about to be involved in legal proceedings (be they as a divorcee, defendant or accused!) It is written in a style that is easy to read and is supported by frequent examples and clarifications.

In summary, if you want a legal overview of the UK, buy this book.
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on 29 August 2011
Very interesting book which was most helpful for when I acted for myself in legal matters and in court. Easy to read and understand. Delivery was quick and the book arrived in excellent condition.
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