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3.6 out of 5 stars8
3.6 out of 5 stars
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on 15 April 2015
A detailed excellent account of the family's history, its growth and partial decline to its survival into the 21 century, with a description of its financial role in the 19th century in building Europe and of the family members and their contributions. Some of the financial descriptions were too complicated to follow, which is why I did not award a fifth star. But then I am not an accountant or banker.
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on 14 August 2014
a bit to technical to read.. but a great true story!!
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on 7 November 2013
The title of this book is "The House of Rothschild: The World's Banker, 1849 - 1998". Unfortunately this title does not really cover the subject. It's not really until the final chapter that we finally get into the period just after World War II.

With the book being published in 1998 I expected something more up to date. But almost everything after 1940 is covered in just one cursory chapter: the epilogue. And this tells us very little. It's almost like a narration of s series of balance sheets and profit and loss statements!

For example, I read in The Synagogue Of Satan - Updated, Expanded, And Uncensored by Andrew Carrington Hitchcock that Amschel Rothschild (then 41) was killed in a Paris in April 1996. Surely this story could have been included in the book! (According to Hitchcock's book, Rupert Murdoch tried to suppress the story, or claim that Amschel died of a heart attack. But I always knew you couldn't trust the Murdoch press, even before the phone-hacking scandal.)

Even some of the major deals are only covered in a few lines I suspect the reason for this is that many of those deals reflect the more recent ones - and they are bad for the public. We don't want people to know that they are being stolen from, do we?

Ferguson seems to suggest that the Rothschild now have little to no power in financial circles. But we know that is not true. They are sucking us dry even more than ever! After all, have you ever seen a flea trying suck blood from another flea?
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on 31 October 2007
Niall Ferguson has written the best account thus far of one of the world's preeminent banking families in history.
Most interesting and rewarding was the author's extensive coverage of the money making process as it developed from the beginnings.
A very major achievement.
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on 24 December 2012
The author has had access to the Rothschild archives and has written, in two volumes, a fascinating history of the family who in the 19th. century, became the richest family in the history of the world. Their power and influence was enormous in Europe and in most countries of the world but, strangely, the family were virtually not involved in the rise of America's great industrial power. This is an absolutely riveting read.
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on 10 November 2012
Dan Ring's Amazon review mentions the Rothschild's "eventual eclipse by American bankers like J. P. Morgan." Isn't it the case that 80% of Morgan's estate actually belonged to the Rothschilds, and that he, like John D. Rockefeller, was merely a Rothschild agent? Based simply on a projection of their known wealth during the 1850's, they must be colossally wealthy. The idea that they 'lost their touch' and much of their money during the twentieth century is not supported by evidence.
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on 31 October 2015
It is a good advertisement for the family.
I think the book was sponsored by them.
Unfortunately, nothing mentioned about their real face / target surprisingly
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on 3 September 2008
err my fault as I bought the wrong book when I wanted the first volume. I expected to look at the personalities behind the House of Rothschild but you rarely get that and instead I found it to be boring trawling through the numerous financial trades they made at the time. Not really interested in the financial history but characters. Wrong expectation I guess.
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