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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful insight into Soviet times
I thought this book was a most interesting insight into the ways of the KGB. The bravery of Mitrokhin to bring all of these revelations to light must be admired.
Having close relation to someone who lived in the latter part of Soviet times, Mitrokhin's archive even manages to surprise those who were living it day to day.
I enjoyed reading this book from start...
Published on 1 Sep 2000

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26 of 37 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great insight but too subjective and politicised
This perhaps is one of the most detailed and comprehensive books ever written on the activities of the KGB around the world during the Cold War. It requires some knowledge of modern history and an interest in the world of government intelligence services. The fact that it is based on the information collected over many years by the KGB's veteran archivist from the KGB...
Published on 13 Jun 2003 by Daniel Gupta


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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful insight into Soviet times, 1 Sep 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Mitrokhin Archive: The KGB in Europe and the West (Penguin Press History) (Paperback)
I thought this book was a most interesting insight into the ways of the KGB. The bravery of Mitrokhin to bring all of these revelations to light must be admired.
Having close relation to someone who lived in the latter part of Soviet times, Mitrokhin's archive even manages to surprise those who were living it day to day.
I enjoyed reading this book from start to finish, but sometimes the level of information given at any one time was too congested, the book jumped from time to time leaving me confused as to which time was being mentioned, but it didn't hinder my enjoyment too much.
My other criticism of this title is that there is an intended second volume from what I can grasp, I feel that as a chronological history of the whole KGB era was presented the introduction of a second volume is largely unnecessary. Maybe a better structure of this volume would have sufficed.
All in all on sheer content I give this book four stars. I really recommend it as criticisms aside, there is a certain "shock value" when you realise that this is fact and not fiction. One of the most interesting, and perhaps worrying, parts deals with the "Centre's" pre-occupations of USA nuclear first strikes both in the 60's and 80's, that was enough to realise that it really is a good job what happened has happened.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read, 1 Dec 1999
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This review is from: The Mitrokhin Archive (Hardcover)
In this superb book, Vasili Mitrokhin and Christopher Andrew have written the definitive account of the Cold War. With the help of the KGB files exfiltrated by Mitrokihn, the authors show how the Soviet regime's paranoia over Western influences drove it to extaordinary lengths to safeguard its empire.
Although the revelations about Melita Norwood have made all the headlines, there is much else here to commend this book to the reader of modern history. My favourite piece concerned the influence of Pope John Paul II on the downfall of the Polish communist regime, although you could take your pick from the October Revolution, the Great Terror, or the demise of the Soviet Union in the late eighties; this book spans the entire seven decades of the Soviet behemoth.
Although this book is a heavy read (it is over seven hundred pages long), the patient reader will be rewarded with perspectives on the Cold War that no other book can offer. Thanks to the Mitrokhin archive, we can not only understand why the Soviet regime collapsed, but what preserved it for seventy years.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well written and interesting read, 18 Aug 2013
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This review is from: The Mitrokhin Archive: The KGB in Europe and the West (Penguin Press History) (Paperback)
It's very well written and interesting read about KGB. It's very interesting to read.

The style of the book is very good. The author of the book did very deep research on KGB activities.

It's fascinating to read!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Communist Espionage during the Cold War, 10 April 2013
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This review is from: The Mitrokhin Archive: The KGB in Europe and the West (Penguin Press History) (Paperback)
I used to work as a journalist writing on East-West politics during the days of the Cold War.This book is a marvellous reference volume. i had a copy, lent it to someone, cannot not remember who, so I have purchased another from you as a replacement. To anyone interested in espionage, it is highly authoritative and great to dip in and out of.....for example I wanted to know about the death of Trotsky in Mexico as there was a book being read on Radio 4 Book of the week. This book filled in all the background for me
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26 of 37 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great insight but too subjective and politicised, 13 Jun 2003
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Daniel Gupta (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Mitrokhin Archive: The KGB in Europe and the West (Penguin Press History) (Paperback)
This perhaps is one of the most detailed and comprehensive books ever written on the activities of the KGB around the world during the Cold War. It requires some knowledge of modern history and an interest in the world of government intelligence services. The fact that it is based on the information collected over many years by the KGB's veteran archivist from the KGB archives gives it extra authority. However, the book's blatant bias in favour of British MI6 prevents it from being top grade material. While it is undoubtful that Western liberal democracy is by far morally superior and legitimate form of government than socialist authoritarianism, it is important to remember that espionage is a very dirty business irrespective of the government it is conducted by. 'The Mirtokhin Archive' fails to acknowledge that ultimately the KGB was more successful than MI6 had ever been. The KGB's enormous successes in infiltrating the highest levels of MI6 are discredited by a combination of ideological arguments and apparent absurdity of Soviet decision-making in foreign affairs, while the most minor successes of British MI6 are made into major victories over the KGB. This is exactly what the British government wants the public to believe. 'The Mitrokhin Archive' is ultimately great material (of Vasili Mitrokhin) spoiled by MI6's self-praising political spin (by Christopher Andrew).
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Mitrokin Archive, 27 Jan 2013
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J. Rutley "John Rutley" (Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Mitrokhin Archive (Hardcover)
I agree with everything all other reviewers of this book say. However, at the end of the day, the thing that stands out in my mind is what did all that effort by all those thousands upon thousands of agents of the NKVD/OGPU/KGB really achieve?? Nothing as far as I can see. It did not contribute to the victory of Communism. All that spying, all that betrayal. One cannot but conclude that all those people were duped. It causes me a great deal of mirth when I read about the reasons of all those very intelligent men scurrying around collecting what they thought would be material that would bring down the capitalist world. It all reads like a boy scouts annual. When the Soviet Union collapsed all those 'agents' must have turned in their graves!!
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fantastic inside account of the KGB, 19 Dec 2001
By 
epps30@hotmail.com (Gillingham, Kent, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Mitrokhin Archive: The KGB in Europe and the West (Penguin Press History) (Paperback)
An in-depth, comperhensive account of the KGB over 80 years. Can be heavy going, but provides an excellent account of "the other side" before, during, and after the cold war.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The two faces of Cold War, 28 May 2007
By 
Anna Abrahamyan "Annathens" (Belgium) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Mitrokhin Archive (Hardcover)
The Mitrokhin Archive is an account of intelligence operations conducted by the KGB in successful attempts to infiltrate the British MI6. The volume itself is a proof of how much information Mitrokhin managed to 'keep alive' and how much more he most probably still possesses.

At times complex in terms of terminology and writing style, this book provides the best means of looking at the "vie quotidien" of the much self-imposing Soviet intelligence service. Its long, invisible hand stretched both inside and outside the Soviet borders in such miniscule detail. Thanks to Mitrokhin, former dissidents and Soviet citizens can now relax knowing that their fears and sometimes paranoic thoughts were justified and real. However, what astonishes the most is how devoted the British 'recruits' were in their collaboration with the KGB.

However, in the light of Litvinenko's death, one question remains unanswered. For how long the imabalance of power brokering will be inflicting upon the East-West relations, causing prolonged damage to regional integration and peaceful co-existence. Both this volume and later additional editions fail to put recommendations on how a balanced relationship could be built. It remains pessimistic in all its Soviet glitter.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Compelling, Thorough, 9 April 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: The Mitrokhin Archive (Hardcover)
Prof. Andrew's work is very clear and covers a vast topic and time period. It makes it very easy to understand the importance of intelligence when trying to understand modern intenational theory. I can't wait until the second volume, covering the rest of the world appears in Autumn. It will be a timely memorial to Vasili Mitrokhin.
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5.0 out of 5 stars a most brutal nation, 22 July 2014
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This review is from: The Mitrokhin Archive (Hardcover)
a major piece of scholarship
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