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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great read
I don't see why anyone could give this one star. It's a great read. Its weakness is only the subject matter, which is very cliche, and yes, it's very predictable and you work out within the first 50 pages what's going to happen. But I think it is saved by Lisa Jewell's fine story-telling skills. She has a knack for making you turn pages and a very addictive style. The...
Published on 26 Oct 2000

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3.0 out of 5 stars "intelligent but not intellectual"
When Dig somehow finds his long lost love in his living room getting on down to all those god-do-I-really-have-this-one-in-my-collection CDs, he begins to sense for the first time that perhaps Delilah Lillie might not be The One.
At school Dig and Nadine had been inseparable, best friends until Delilah Lillie, the Queen of Holy Trinity, had come strolling along one...
Published on 30 Oct 2000


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great read, 26 Oct 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Thirtynothing (Paperback)
I don't see why anyone could give this one star. It's a great read. Its weakness is only the subject matter, which is very cliche, and yes, it's very predictable and you work out within the first 50 pages what's going to happen. But I think it is saved by Lisa Jewell's fine story-telling skills. She has a knack for making you turn pages and a very addictive style. The scenes are set-pieces aren't a patch on 'Ralph's Party', which was fresh and vivid - here in 'Thirtynothing' there are too many scenes which look as if they've been cut and pasted out of movies - such as the scene where Dig follows Delilah and thinks to himself 'He didn't do things like this, people in films did things like this...' But even so I think that for all its faults, it is still a cut-above the average CHick Lit novel, and something which will keep you glued to from beginning to end. Another good one which reminded me of this was Robyn Sisman's 'Just Friends' which is remarkably similar in style and subject - I can't work out which I prefer, Sisman's has a better, unpredictable plot, but Jewell is better at characterisation.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Charming, 22 Aug 2010
By 
CC (Devon, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Thirtynothing (Paperback)
I first read this years ago, and picked it up in a charity shop recently. I quite enjoyed it. The plot may be predictable (best friends realise that they are in love), but the characterisation and dialogue are sparkling. There's more that just naff romance - Nadine's dilemma with con-man Phil, Dig's sense of coasting, Delilah's troubled past and seemingly perfect present, and everyone's refusal to grow up before they have to. Better than most romance novels, and does a good job of writing both the male and female characters in a warm and believable manner.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable funny read, 26 Oct 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Thirtynothing (Paperback)
I really enjoyed this book and found myself being irritated that I had this annoying break called work in between my reading sessions. Having read Ralph's party and then reading about Lisa Jewell's success story (Oh I wish!) and then deciding I needed a light book for the tube, this is what I came away with. I think it's better written than Ralph's Party and funnier, but maybe that's because I can identify with it more. My only criticism is that in the middle of the book there are far too many pages devoted to the loser-man's sad story, which didn't need so much detail.
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3.0 out of 5 stars "intelligent but not intellectual", 30 Oct 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Thirtynothing (Paperback)
When Dig somehow finds his long lost love in his living room getting on down to all those god-do-I-really-have-this-one-in-my-collection CDs, he begins to sense for the first time that perhaps Delilah Lillie might not be The One.
At school Dig and Nadine had been inseparable, best friends until Delilah Lillie, the Queen of Holy Trinity, had come strolling along one day and taken young Digby Ryan for herself; something which Nadine has never quite forgotten.
Nadine has long since re-established herself as Dig's best mate and is thus not best pleased when her nemesis reappears on the scene, looking no less lovely and perhaps even a little younger than when she deserted Dig, for no apparent reason, some twelve years ago.
This isn't quite "When Dig Met Nadine", but it's not far off. It's a good formula to work with and Lisa Jewell exploits it well in combination with her page turning style which worked so effectively in her debut novel, "Ralph's Party."
Lisa Jewell's books might best be described as Dig would describe his perfect woman: "intelligent but not intellectual". Thirty-nothing is a book you can look at in bed when you wake up on at Saturday morning and think - great, it's the weekend and I'm still single, but at least I'm reading a decent book.
After years of immersing herself in The Cure, The Smiths and Echo and The Bunnymen, Delilah has come to realise that she'd actually rather be having a bit of a boogie to Robbie Williams, or Billie. In a similar way, you might find that thirty-nothing offers a little light relief.
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3.0 out of 5 stars "intelligent but not intellectual", 27 Oct 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Thirtynothing (Paperback)
When Dig somehow finds his long lost love in his living room getting on down to all those god-do-I-really-have-this-one-in-my-collection CDs, he begins to sense for the first time that perhaps Delilah Lillie might not be The One.
At school Dig and Nadine had been inseparable, best friends until Delilah Lillie, the Queen of Holy Trinity, had come strolling along one day and taken young Digby Ryan for herself; something which Nadine has never quite forgotten.
Nadine has long since re-established herself as Dig's best mate and is thus not best pleased when her nemesis reappears on the scene, looking no less lovely and perhaps even a little younger than when she deserted Dig, for no apparent reason, some twelve years ago.
This isn't quite "When Dig Met Nadine", but it's not far off. It's a good formula to work with and Lisa Jewell exploits it well in combination with her page turning style which worked so effectively in her debut novel, "Ralph's Party."
Lisa Jewell's books might best be described as Dig would describe his perfect woman: "intelligent but not intellectual". Thirty-nothing is a book you can look at in bed when you wake up on at Saturday morning and think - great, it's the weekend and I'm still single, but at least I'm reading a decent book.
After years of immersing herself in The Cure, The Smiths and Echo and The Bunnymen, Delilah has come to realise that she'd actually rather be having a bit of a boogie to Robbie Williams, or Billie. In a similar way, you might find that thirty-nothing offers a little light relief.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Still sparkling?, 10 Sep 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Thirtynothing (Paperback)
Not the most inspired back cover blurb we've seen but we'll let that pass. The front and back cover design of Thirty-Nothing is in the now established 'Lisa Jewell' theme and style - and pretty snappy it is too.
Thirty-Nothing is not a very original idea - two should-be lovers who have been best friends for many years get together with other people whilst realising that they're destined to be together. As I say, it's hardly ground-breaking. But that's not necessarily a bad thing. Popular themes are popular for a reason.
It becomes very clear during the opening chapters that Lisa Jewell's second novel is in many ways a far superior piece of writing than her first, Ralph's Party. Firstly, you'll find the quality of writing vastly improved and secondly, Lisa Jewell has found humour. Thirty-Nothing features it's fair share of laughter moments.
Thirty-Nothing is not perfect. The storyline throws few surprises at you - even when it tries to - and you'll likely be aware of the next plot-development at least a chapter before it actually happens, but the quality of writing that takes you there will disarm you. It also helps that the two leading characters, Dig and Nadine, are utterly likable. Even the two ex's, Delilah and Phil, are somehow likable despite their flaws.
A polished piece of writing.
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4.0 out of 5 stars a dead heat with "Ralph", 18 Sep 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Thirtynothing (Paperback)
Last time I was in London, there were RP posters at every tube station. Intrigued, I bought it, and it's been my Gawd-I-Miss-London book of choice for over a year now. Had to, of course, order Thirtynothing from amazon.uk before it came out over here... I have mixed feelings. The bad one is--the "plot" is still thin, and it lacks the intricacies of RP that make it worth re(and re and re and re)-reading. But the GOOD one is, she has matured SOOOO much as a writer in just a year--the characters (esp. Delilah as compared to Cheri) weren't so two dimensional--and Dig was a MUCH more realistic man than Ralph or Karl or Rick (I can see him hanging out with Hornby's characters and not getting jeered at). They say the third time's the charm--perhaps her next novel will fuse the better aspects of the first two? (Dare we hope? I'll wait for it on this end w/ bated breath). Anyway, it's a beautiful little bit of fluff--perfect vacation or bed-time reading--sweet, but not too filling. And, to reiterate, GAWD, I miss London!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lisa Jewell is my favourite author, 18 Sep 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Thirtynothing (Paperback)
I loved Ralph's party and i didn't think lisa Jewell could write another novel as good as that. But she has! Thirtynothing is BRILLIANT, i laughed out loud, I nearly cried, and i was wincing in some places especially when Nadine gets drunk and leaves a message (i won't say any more, go out and read it!) Thanks Lisa, can't wait for the third book!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely delightful!, 31 Oct 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Thirtynothing (Paperback)
As an avid reader of trash fiction, most of which is fun but instantly forgettable, I was really surprised at how good this book was - and how much it has stayed with me! Unlike many of its peers, thirtynothing is extremely well written and Lisa Jewell has a talent for vivid description rarely matched. She writes humour and gritty realism with equal skill and the story kept me gripped right until the end. I think it's unimportant if you think you know what's likely to happen in the end - it's the getting there that's interesting. It's a delightfully sunny, funny book with some unexpected dark corners. I have to say that I'm surprised by the comments about it being a rip-off of 'my best friend's wedding' - if any of those reviewers knew how long it takes to get a novel into print, they would realise that either Ms Jewell has some very good contacts in Hollywood or she can see into the future! Don't let them put you off Lisa!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars wonderful,escapist, feelgood chick lit, 8 Jan 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Thirtynothing (Paperback)
Having never read Ralph's Party, I picked this book up because of the colourful front cover. I know you're not meant to judge a book by its cover, but on this occassion, my instincts were right. The synopisis on the back of the book does it no credit. The story colourfully unfolds with descriptions of the everyday quirks of friendship and realising that your life is going the wrong way. Thirtynothing's characters are believeble and engaging. The icky Phil was extremely like my first boyfriend at the tender age of 16 and made me cringe. This may not be a classic and probably won't be studied by uninterested schoolkids, but this is an excellent book wnhcih avoids the usual 'does my bum look big in this' female neurosis, and stands out from the current deluge of city girl literature. Nice one!
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Thirtynothing
Thirtynothing by Lisa Jewell (Paperback - 7 Sep 2000)
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