Customer Reviews


779 Reviews
5 star:
 (598)
4 star:
 (106)
3 star:
 (45)
2 star:
 (14)
1 star:
 (16)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


98 of 101 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth reading cos it's brilliant, never mind all the hype!
If you can, skip the introduction to 1984.
Forget the film. Or any other adaptation.
Forget that it *might* be comment on society 50 years ago and that it *might* apply to Soviet / Sino governments which hardly exist any more.
The themes which Orwell tackles are completely relevant today, and his method for exploring them is as fresh now as when I first...
Published on 31 July 2007 by Rowena Hoseason

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting ideas, but awfully slow at presenting them.
I have a friend who is currently studying psychology and is genuinely interested in how people think and the power of the mind. He would love Nineteen Eighty-Four, in fact I intend to recommend it to him on the principle that I did not, an unpopular opinion though that seems to be.

I started reading this knowing literally nothing about it (more fool me) but...
Published 1 month ago by FallenGrace


‹ Previous | 160 61 6278 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A literature classic, 1 Jun 2006
By 
Mr. P. Datta "Pritthijit" (Stockton on Tees, Teesside) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nineteen Eighty-Four (Paperback)
The Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell though was published in the 1940's. It sets a futuristic vision of Britain based in 1984. The setting of the book is impressively and imaginatively illustrated with varied range of ideas and concepts.

The concept of "Big Brother" was pioneered during the defined time period. This later inspired to the idea of the controversial reality TV show "Big Brother" in the late 90's to the present. 1984 novel centered on Winston who works for a government department knowns as Ministry of Truth. Following the truth, he later rebells against the government by registering as member of the brother hood and wants to rewrite history. This action proves costly, as the government was tracking his movements. His action was understandable, as he is frustated by the way government controls society.

What do we learn from the novel? Society is controlled by totalaritan government. Civil rights are abandoned and freedom for members are cruelly denied. In today's society, this brutal regieme would gain no toleratance at all, as santions are likely to be imposed on guilty countries of denying civils rights. The social and political implications of government bruality is well touched upon and narratted in a powerful, complex and compelling novel.

"1984" addresses interesting themes, but some of it is not easy to grasp in one go. George Orwell proves his literacy class as a widely acclaimed author in the 20th century. The novel 1984 is well appreciated by literacy societies and studied as a main text from various education organisations. The novel "1984" leaves a literacy legacy which surely present a real challenge to surpass due to the complex subject matter touched upon and the powerful influences it continues to pass on.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolute Power Corrupts, 23 Feb 2005
By 
This review is from: Nineteen Eighty-Four (Paperback)
This is a very interesting book that should be read along with the author's other book Animal Farm. I read the book and saw the VHS starring Hurt and Burton which is mostly a faithful representation of the book - and a good movie in color.
Once the smoke and rhetoric clears this is essentially a love story about a man living in what appears to be a communist society or perhaps the National Socialists that has evolved into a tightly controlled and hero worshipping society, i.e.: pictures of the leader ("B.B.") big brother are omnipresent and everyone wears similar blue overalls, eats similar food, etc. Big brother has taken on a persona similar to Stalin or Mao and like those totalitarian communist societies, the misfits or independent thinkers or small business people are banished to camps or simply killed. Propaganda is the norm and (again) like similar 20th century communist countries history is re-written almost daily to reflect the current whims of the leaders.
Unlike many imperfect countries including most western countries and other free countries that have survived the upheavals of the 20th century, we are subject to government propaganda and media bias but we are free to turn off our TV sets, not read the papers, buy any book that we so desire, have religious freedoms or free to be agnostics, and choose to protest and vote as we see fit. This is all lacking in 1984 where society is strictly controlled. Each TV is interactive and monitors the owner for deviations from the accepted patterns of behaviour; it is connected with the "thought police", and is turned on all the time to monitor the citizens. Only high party members have the luxury of turning off their interactive TV connected to the "thought police" and drinking wine and participating in the normally accepted pleasures of life. As we read in the book Animal Farm, the utopian ideals of a perfect society are replaced by the corruption brought on by absolute power.
The "average citizens" including our hero in 1984 are subject to a continuous stream of propaganda about external armed conflicts, false production figures to offset real material shortages, criminal activities against big brother and the party, confessions of party members gone astray, etc. They cannot read independent books or articles. Such books, that would expose the government propaganda for what it is, are all banned. People who do not conform are routinely arrested and hung at public hangings - that are televised seemingly daily.
The plot is sinister in that the ruling party members use thought control and torture to manipulate the masses including our hero, so the citizens lose most of their human qualities and are zombie like. This is a chilling movie about how a society can take a wrong turn.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 22 Sep 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Nineteen Eighty-four (Paperback)
Interesting Book
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 16 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Nineteen Eighty-Four (Paperback)
Worth to read it
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great edition thanks, 7 Dec 2014
By 
Yerton "Stephen" (Ayrshire, Scotland) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Nineteen Eighty-Four (Paperback)
A great edition
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 18 Sep 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Nineteen Eighty-Four (Paperback)
fantastic book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 1 Sep 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Fantastic read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars scary, 19 May 2008
Its scary how this book could be almost documentary like, everything, although this is almost like a sci fi novel, you can imagine being real. There was so much detail, so much to think about it leaves you realing for ages after. Can't say enough good things about this book. Its every bit as good as its reputation (which is rare) so I suggest everyone reads it, if only to find out what happens when the real big brother is watching.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mind Blowing!, 7 May 2003
By 
Samantha Evans (Birmingham, England United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: 1984 Nineteen Eighty-Four (Paperback)
Goerge Orwell writes with such conviction I found myself expecting the thought police to burst through my door and Vapourise me for reading this novel!! Winston (main character) is able to see through all of the propaganda of the party and eventually falls in love, only to be arrested by the thought police and tortured. It's amazing and I honestly didn't see the ending coming! Read it read it read it!!!!!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book loved by the UK's own Big Brothers - Brown and Blair., 21 Feb 2007
By 
J. D. Aspinall (South West England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Nineteen Eighty-Four (Paperback)
Tony Blair is finished, but the way that Gordon Brown arrogantly swaggers about, becoming more presidential by the day, tells me that the poisonous Labour Party still has plans for us.

This is a tricky book to review. So much has been written about it since its publication that the question has to be: what on earth can be said about it that hasn't already been said or written?

This is a horror novel - pure and simple. Smith's predicament is awful and utterly believable, all thanks to Orwell's bleak, desperate prose and brutally insightful imagination. It could also be described as prophetic, I think.

The novel opens with the totalitarian government already in place, the masses already beaten into submission - but how did it all start? No government could shift from Democracy (however false), to this novel's style of complete control and brainwashing overnight. I would love to know Orwell's thoughts about how the transition was made - and how long it took...

Would Orwell take a look at the style of government we have now, and see the beginnings of dangerous state interference at work? The way Tony Blair and Gordon Brown have created a government based on deception and manipulating the public may sound alarm bells in Orwell's mind - if only he were here to have his say.

People have pride in their national identity - their nation's history, as well. So that needs to be eroded first. How would Big brother do that in the novel? Maybe it started with opening the country's borders to anyone that fancied it, so that the national identity that binds people together could start to dissolve - all in the name of "diversity". Maybe early Big Brother insisted on smearing anyone who argued against this as "racist". Sound familiar?

But Big Brother wouldn't stop there, would it? It would need to quicken the

Eradication of National Identity by binding as many nations together by whatever means it could; a single currency, a common foreign policy between nations, perhaps? Maybe that's how Orwell would have written it if 1984 contained Big Brother's back story. That would just be the start, wouldn't it?

Perhaps Big Brother would construct the largest DNA database in the world, and try and force the people to carry ID cards containing DNA samples? Maybe it would want to bug the cars on its streets so that the police would automatically know who had broken the speed limit, and where the driver was when they did it? Sound familiar?

It's impossible to know how Orwell would have handled Big Brother's back story, and also ridiculous to say that such a society and government could never exist. Ask a Romanian.

In a few years you could ask a Brit.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 160 61 6278 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

1984 Nineteen Eighty-Four
1984 Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell (Paperback - 3 Sep 1998)
Used & New from: £0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews