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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Maybe no news but plenty of laughs at Throat Lake
Lawrence Donegan was, you see, a former member of Lloyd Cole and the Commotions who went on to become a reporter with 'The Guardian' newspaper before finding himself in Donegal first on a farm and then on the staff of the 'Tirconaill Tribune.'Knowing him though wouldn't be enough for me to say his book was good even if I thought it wasn't. Even Match of the Day got a...
Published on 8 Oct 1999

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2.0 out of 5 stars he thinks he is funnier than i do
This book has a great premise , world weary guardian journalist goes back to family roots to live in Creeslough and works for local paper so obscure that i have never read it.It is just a story about life in rural Donegal no funnier , nor more amusing nor intersting than day to day life here. No laugh out loud moments and no little chuckles. This is my second time reading...
Published on 10 Oct 2012 by A. Browne


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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Maybe no news but plenty of laughs at Throat Lake, 8 Oct 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: No News at Throat Lake (Hardcover)
Lawrence Donegan was, you see, a former member of Lloyd Cole and the Commotions who went on to become a reporter with 'The Guardian' newspaper before finding himself in Donegal first on a farm and then on the staff of the 'Tirconaill Tribune.'Knowing him though wouldn't be enough for me to say his book was good even if I thought it wasn't. Even Match of the Day got a miss (well the start of it anyway) as I chortled out loud at Lawrence's recollections of days in Donegal, especially days with the Tirconaill Tribune lads. It is mainly his involvement with the Tribune that gives him the wonderful ammunition for his hilarious, yet sometimes serious look at rural Donegal - from the perspective of somebody arriving from the outside.The title of the book stems from the literal translation of Creeslough (Throat lake) where Lawrence stayed for the best part of a year, mingled with the locals and even managed to worm his way onto the local GAA team. Okay so it was the reserves, but he still got on.The book certainly strips away those Hollywood style myths of rural Ireland with thatched cottages and fairies in the back garden, but in the same token reinforces some of the ideas that we are a breed apart.For instance the Tribune was, let's just say, a bit of a culture shock for Lawrence, but there was no doubt that he loved it. Any reporter would. A paper very much in the same niche type market as the Inish Times, the reports of how the Tribune was put together with late nights and early mornings certainly touched a few chords here.Not that the papers are similar in editorial content or style. No paper is similar to the Tribune, which probably says more about us (other papers that is) than it does of a paper that has the guts to stand for the ordinary person all the time - even when they are wrong. Not one for the subtle approach, John McAteer the paper's 'don't give an eff' editor (okay so he'd say the actual word, highlighting my point I think) could on the back the book become a worldwide celebrity. I could only begin to guess what he'd say to that.From covering a story on stinky and the whale, to his fascination with finding the real story on the Bernard Lafferty tale (you know Doris Duke's Butler) Lawrence had a ball in Donegal a lot of the time. Fantasy of fantasies he even got to meet (well to ask one question to) the girl of his dreams Meryl Streep.Of course his tribute to Diana which caused such an outrage when published by the Tribune will probably ruffle feathers again with some who read it in the book, and his account of his trip to knock. Well, let's just say the more forgiving of those who accompanied him on the bus might say a few rosaries for his soul.- Liam Porter Editor Inish Times
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars could not put it down, 31 Dec 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: No News at Throat Lake (Hardcover)
Best book I've read in years. As an ex-patriot who left Ireland 21 years ago I found myself relating to everything in the book. I found myself laughing out loud too many times to count. Thanks Mr. Donegan for such an enjoyable read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Opting in, opting out, opting in, opting out., 15 Dec 1999
This review is from: No News at Throat Lake (Hardcover)
Donegan captures the phrases of the people showing how they are when you make an effort on their terms. Similar to the smiles you might get in France when making an honest attempt at the language, there is a quiet admiration. In Donegal and rural Ireland this comes from participation in Gaelic football. Donegan does the place proud, describing in warm terms, that show it to be not unlike a lot of places, only more rain.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars He sees life differently, and writes brilliantly., 15 Dec 2002
By 
taking a rest - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: No News at Throat Lake (Hardcover)
I think most people who read a great deal secretly hope to write, I freely admit I am guilty. And so when I read a razor sharp piece of writing that appears to have been written with as much ease as skill, it's a love hate reaction.

Mr. Donegan has senses that are like those we all posses, however that's where the similarity ends. A person hears a phrase spoken; the Author hears it with every possible variation his built in thesaurus provides. We all see an event, he matches, contrasts, or finds a bit of irony, with an infinite number of other events. You do not want to be the subject his attention is focused upon when his wit is at work. He's hyper perceptive, quick and ruthless. Think of a spinning propeller; now walk through it.

A poem appears in a paper he writes for, his comment, "I've never seen such a lethal combination of bad poetry and bad taste. It was the anniversary of her death, after all. As soon as I saw it in the Tirconaill Tribune I wished I had never written it". Sure.

He went to cover an event where the tension between Catholic and Protestant were taught to say the least. Ever resourceful he "bought a copy of The Illustrated Orange Song Book at a street stall (I wanted to learn the words to "The Pope's A Darkie" just in case I ever needed to ingratiate myself with the Reverend Ian Paisly". In the flow of his narrative it is brilliantly placed and timed. I know my repeating it will anger some. I would suggest they lighten up, wretched pun not intended.

This is a memoir of a time spent working for a small newspaper in an even smaller Irish town. It's 90% laugh out loud funny, and perhaps 10% dark, perceptive, social satire. You will enjoy every page, and will hate when it ends.

I cannot wait to see Paul Newman play the Priest that saved an island. It will be his next Oscar.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Such a surprise, 6 Oct 2009
By 
D. Hollander (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: No News at Throat Lake (Paperback)
From a friend I've got a second hand copy of 'No news at Throat Lake'. I've read it during my holidays in Belgium, last summer. What a surprise. Very well written and so comical. But it's not just that, Lawrence Donegan combines the comical parts with very sharp descriptions of the hard life in the northern part of Ireland. It's not always fun living in the country, that he makes very clear. But he does so with so much love for the people that live there. I've enjoyed this book and ordered as result other books he's written.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good, humorous book, 10 May 2014
By 
R. Willson (Dunfanaghy, Donegal) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: No News at Throat Lake (Hardcover)
As a recent blow-in from the UK and now living locally this book has many resonances, funny enough to warrant a punt.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable read, 30 Mar 2013
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This review is from: No News at Throat Lake (Hardcover)
Many people think of escaping stressful lives, leaving the city and making a new life in the countryside. Lawrence doesn't disappear to sunny climes such as Driving over lemons in Provence but instead tries to make it in rainy old Donegal. He tells his story in a humorous down to earth way, that has the ring of truth about it (though he is a journalist so you do wonder). He is a talented guy who has a knack for making friends (it appears), and has the skills necessary to start a new life from scratch. The book has valuable lessons for anyone planning a similar adventure.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I Read This On The Back Of 4 Iron In The Soul, 23 Mar 2013
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This review is from: No News at Throat Lake (Paperback)
A must read for Lawrence Donegan fans. He immerses himself in the culture of Donegal, by working for the local publication, The Tir Conaill Tribune, joining the G.A.A. club and even having a go, at a bit of farming. A typical humour spattered adventure from the Scotsman's pen ensues, before The Guardian lure him away, and his Irish odyssey ends.
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2.0 out of 5 stars he thinks he is funnier than i do, 10 Oct 2012
By 
A. Browne "avid reader" (Donegal Ireland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: No News at Throat Lake (Paperback)
This book has a great premise , world weary guardian journalist goes back to family roots to live in Creeslough and works for local paper so obscure that i have never read it.It is just a story about life in rural Donegal no funnier , nor more amusing nor intersting than day to day life here. No laugh out loud moments and no little chuckles. This is my second time reading this book, this time for my book club it is worse secnd time around. It will be interesting to get feedback from others. I was bored , Lawrence Donegan did not make me feel even the slightest bit interestested in his life or predicament. He got out of there so fast that one gets the feeling that his contract had been fulfilled. Somewhere he is compared to a young Bill Bryson..... in his dreams!!!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great read, 21 Oct 2014
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This review is from: No News at Throat Lake (Hardcover)
Great book and captures modern rural Ireland which still exists
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No News at Throat Lake
No News at Throat Lake by Lawrence Donegan (Paperback - 27 July 2000)
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