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38 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring and thought provoking
Pat Barker has a way of bringing her characters to life that I have rarely encountered before. This is a wonderful trilogy that highlights the true impact of WW1 and the conditions experienced there on the psyche. It creates a very strong vision of what it must have been like for ordinary men to find themselves taken away from their homes and placed in a world of mud...
Published on 27 April 2001

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Damage caused by war and leadership in WW1.
Honest and heavily critical of WW! and our leaders. Very moving in many ways, especially cruelly descriptive of Electric shock treatment.

Men treated like animals when rerturned to trenches to die.
Published 6 months ago by Mr. Charles Poyser


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38 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring and thought provoking, 27 April 2001
By A Customer
Pat Barker has a way of bringing her characters to life that I have rarely encountered before. This is a wonderful trilogy that highlights the true impact of WW1 and the conditions experienced there on the psyche. It creates a very strong vision of what it must have been like for ordinary men to find themselves taken away from their homes and placed in a world of mud and death and incessant noise. It also explores the relationship between men, both sexual and non-sexual and provides a fascinating insight into the development of psychology that took place during WW1. I have read Birdsong, but still find myself reaching for the Regeneration trilogy time and time again. The Eye in the Door is the weakest of the three novels, but this is more than compensated for by the wonderful Ghost Road. These novels are made more poignant by the fact that many of the characters existed in real life, and the views of war portrayed by Pat Barker can be substantiated and expanded by reading their poetry, and that of other war poets
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars stunning, moving but graphic!, 11 Oct 2005
By 
Miss Dewhirst (Yorkshire, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I had to read the first book in the trilogy - "Regeneration" for my A Levels and when i saw the book and read the blurb i immediately thought "how boring is this going to be?" Yet when i eventually forced myself to start reading it, i was gripped by the end of the first chapter and within a week i'd bought and read the rest of the trilogy too! Contrary to other reviewers, my favourite book was The Eye in The Door, which contains a lot more politics and is also moving and very graphic with sexual imagery and other topics. Actually, the other two books were pretty moving and graphic too so be wary if you're a bit prudish! The first book in the trilogy concentrates on the poet Seigrfried Sassoon, his friendship with another poet Wilfrid Owen and a fictional officer called Billy Prior, who are all convalescing in hospital after suffereing shellshock, with the aid of the doctor, Rivers. The second concentrates more on Billy Prior, with some references back to Sassoon and Owen and the third is mostly about Prior and their doctor in the hospital, the real Dr W H Rivers. All three books contain connotations about homosexuality(something that was then illegal) and also the usual wartime book themes about the brutality and pointlessness of war. Don't dismiss them (as i almost did) as historical tat, they are all three, fantastic novels that bring out emotions and make you fully realise the futility of war and the complexity of psyhcology. Pure, Grade A Excellence!
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'Unputdownable', 9 May 2001
I too read the book over a year ago and I still think about it a lot. I've just visited Flanders - both Belgium and France and my interest in the First World War stemmed from reading this trilogy.I think a large part of my enjoyment was because many of the characters actually existed. The film 'Regeneration' is good too. Anybody interested in WW1 and has enjoyed 'Birdsong' and also the work of the poets Sassoon and Owen will thoroughly enjoy this book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars casualties of war, 8 Oct 2007
By 
Didier (Ghent, Belgium) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
When it comes to literature on war and what it does to man, few novels outdo Pat Barker's Regeneration trilogy. They may take place during WW I, but they have a relevance far beyond the Great War. My personal favorite is 'Regeneration', the first volume of the three, but all of them are world class literature. If I were in favour of the concept (which I'm not), this should be compulsory literature to each and everyone.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An amzing, powerful and moving book, 16 Aug 1999
By A Customer
I could not put it down and read it in a single long haul flight over night. The description of life during the first world war, both in France and at home was both realistic and thought provoking. Although the eye in the door was weaker than the others in the trilogy, the whole is much greater than the sum of its parts, encompassing every part of the human condition. The accounts of Rivers' work was as enthralling as the action in the trenches, altogether a stunning piece of literature, fully deserving the booker prize
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very readable faction account of the effects of WWI, 8 Feb 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Regeneration Trilogy: Regeneration; the Eye in the Door; the Ghost Road: "Regeneration", "Eye in the Door", "Ghost Road" (Paperback)
These three books take us through the horrors of the First World War, though without judgement on the rights and wrongs of war. In the first part of the trilogy, the war poet Siegfried Sasson has been sent to Craiglockart, and Edinburgh rehabilitation centre for the shell-shocked. In fact, he is not mentally ill, but has refused to fight; as an officer, he was sent to Craiglockart to preserve his honour. There he is treated by the psychologist, William Rivers, and we encounter his other patients. It is through the eyes of Rivers and his patients that we feel the effects of the war. Wilfred Owen, the young and promising poet, is also a resident, and we are also introduced to the surly Billy Prior. It is his story and that of Rivers that carries the story through the second and third part of the trilogy. This book is wonderfully readable; the terrible experiences of the patients are presented, in their full horror, for our own analysis and fact and fiction are seamlessly interwoven. The first part is certainly the strongest of the three, but to read only one would be missing out.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You have to read it!, 25 April 2006
By 
Liz (Hull, UK) - See all my reviews
I first read Regeneration when i was lent it at school to read for my A-Levels, it was the first war literature i had ever read and i wasn't expecting to enjoy it! However when i finally started reading it i couldn't put it down and as soon as i finished it i got 'The eye in the door' and 'the ghost road' from the library.

The whole trilogy is incredibly impressive, and if anything they just get better,the trilogy is extremely realistic and Barker's flawless interweaving of both past and fiction is a credit to her unsurpassable writing style.

I am now studying English at uni and chose WW1 as a module to study, partly so i could re-read Regeneration. The second reading is just as good as the first, if not more poignant and this will always be one of my favourite books.

This trilogy ignited an interest that i may never have discovered and for that it will always remain a favourite read. Barker is a master at confronting the taboos of war and forcing the reader to face the reality of the damage that this war caused emotionally and physically.

If you're interested in WW1 literature or have to study it for A-levels make sure you read this book because it is one of the best examples of WW1 literature in existence!
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous, 4 May 2003
As a student studying war literature, i've had to wade through a fair bit, but this trilogy was a delight. Whilst her earlier work tends to jar a little, Pat Barker has obviously developed her characterisations since the days of Union Street, and it shows. The novel provides a useful insight into the historical background of Sassoon and Owen during their times at Craiklockhart (although it's by no means biographical), and would be just as interesting to psychologists as historians or literatre enthusiasts. Each novel takes a slightly different focus - the first is (loosely) centered round Sassoon's anti-war protest, the second around 'conchies' and the third on Rivers's missionary work in Africa. This gives Barker great scope to develop various themes, without falling into the trap of making sweeping generalisations. I can't recommend this book enough.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, 17 Dec 2011
By 
Ms A. Breen (Coventry, U.K.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Regeneration Trilogy: Regeneration; the Eye in the Door; the Ghost Road: "Regeneration", "Eye in the Door", "Ghost Road" (Paperback)
I read this trilogy out of order as I first came across the second book "The Eye in the Door" in the library. I was hooked and had to get my hands on the other two. Pat Barkers protrayal of the men involved in WWI is both sensitive and poignant. Many of the characters and events in the books are real. Pat has obviously done a lot of research and suceeded in protraying their characters as accurately as is possible. She brings the great tragedy of WWI vividly to life. Her books prompted me to find out more about WH Rivers - who was a great scientist and a man ahead of his time.
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A worthy prizewinner!, 18 Oct 2001
By A Customer
The fact that "The Ghost Road" won the Booker prize actually put me off reading this book for years! I thought that it would be unreadable, elitist tosh! How glad I am that I took the plunge - this trilogy is excellent! Thank you, Pat Barker for renewing my faith in the future of English literature. Moving, informative, gripping, poetic and laced with black humour, it's one of those rare times when I feel privileged to have read a book. Yes, "The Eye in the Door" is the weakest of the trilogy, but the other two more than compensate. Forget the shallow, cliched, Disneyesque codswollop of "Birdsong", this is real life and real love! Enjoy!
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