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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Moving, sexy, funny and moving again, in that order
This is Emma Donoghue's second novel, and is the one that her fans had been hoping she'd write; bigger, more ambitious, tougher, dealing with the pain of bereavement and the even more elusive pain of having to hide your grief. Donoghue is brilliant at getting inside the curiously detached and stunned psyche of her main character, Pen (another one of Donoghue's...
Published on 26 Nov 1999

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars review
The book itself is well written, and cleverly thought out. Having read Astray and Slammerkin I feel that Emma Donoghue has an ability to write knowledgably about diverse topics.
Published 8 months ago by mystic


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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Moving, sexy, funny and moving again, in that order, 26 Nov 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Hood (Paperback)
This is Emma Donoghue's second novel, and is the one that her fans had been hoping she'd write; bigger, more ambitious, tougher, dealing with the pain of bereavement and the even more elusive pain of having to hide your grief. Donoghue is brilliant at getting inside the curiously detached and stunned psyche of her main character, Pen (another one of Donoghue's suggestive character names: the dead lover is called Cara, the lover's father - with whom the two women lived - is Mr Wall. Symbolism ahoy!) Once again, her technique of dramatising feelings by behaviour rather than by indigestible flights of interior monologue pays off. Pen gobbles cakes on the bus and then pukes them into a bush; she fantasises about making a pass at her lover's emigre sister. The days go by and she seems no closer to having any definite feelings about her lover's death, or her current predicament. Hood has more respect for its minor characters than Donoghue's earlier Stir-Fry, probably because the characters are older and not being seen through the eyes of a seventeen-year-old. As it says on the back cover, it's a kind of hymn to the pleasure of feeling ordinary; in a sense, you could say that of all her books, but this one dramatises it particularly well. Beautifully written, intelligent and unsentimental. A lovely book.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Powerful, passionate and full of dignity., 1 Feb 2000
This review is from: Hood (Paperback)
Emma Donaghue provides us with a enigmatic look at just a splinter of what it feels like to lose somebody you love and bear all this pain in secret. She writes supremely making the reader believe this story with all the small details of what being in a relationship is all about, the fighting, and not forgetting the making up. It is one of the most powerful stories that I have ever read and helps me belive that sometimes you are not on your own.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moving and close to the skin, 16 Mar 2007
By 
M. H. Costeris (Utrecht, the Netherlands) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Hood (Paperback)
Pen's lover, a woman she has been with for 13 years, has just died in a car crash and now she finds herself trying to survive the first week as a secret widow.

Her daily life as well as the memories that crowd her are described in vivid detail. Her voice is clear from the very first page. Both her hometown Dublin and the other people in her life come alive on the page.

What I loved most about the book is the reality of the emotions. There is nothing fake here. The writing is strong and sparse with spot-on dialogue.

Pen is a beautiful character, a woman who bears the compromises she has chosen to make with dignity and humour.

The mood of the book is hard to shake off sometimes though, definitely not one for the beach.
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3.0 out of 5 stars review, 28 Dec 2013
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This review is from: Hood (Hardcover)
The book itself is well written, and cleverly thought out. Having read Astray and Slammerkin I feel that Emma Donoghue has an ability to write knowledgably about diverse topics.
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4.0 out of 5 stars hood, 14 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Hood (Kindle Edition)
Found it hard to get into the characters of this book, that's why I only gave this a four star rating. It wasn't until I had read about three quarters of the book that I knew who the characters actually were, then it became rather disjointed. Never quite sure if it was a memory or actual happening. However, after saying that, I think now after getting to grips with the characters and now knowing that Grace is a male cat (I know different) and not a friend, a second read maybe on the cards but I`m in no rush.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 23 July 2014
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This review is from: Hood (Kindle Edition)
Unusual story of love and loss......well told!
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3 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good look at relationships, 14 Jan 2003
By 
Melanie (Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Hood (Hardcover)
Most books have a beginning, middle and end, and this book starts at the end. I found myself, while turning the pages looking for the story line, trying to figure out the plot.
It seem's though, that there is no plot, there doesn't seem to be a goal for any of the characters, apart from Pen trying to force herself to cry and feel the grief she feel's she is expected to feel for her dead lover.
What emerges from Pen's grief are relationships which seem more real than those found in any love story. We watch as Cara's hold over Pen continues to dictate Pen's life even after Cara has died, and Pen tries to regain her independance.
Not a very entertaining read, but certainly one to start the mind ticking about your own relationships.
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Hood by Emma Donoghue (Paperback - 27 Jun 1996)
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