Customer Reviews


3 Reviews
5 star:    (0)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Frighteningly prescient and still relevant
This is not a plot synopsis - which can be found elsewhere. Written by Thomas Mann's elder brother this novella -released in 1913- is frighteningly prescient. A relatively slim volume, it is a good read with a few laughs, moments of great pathos and some chilling (in retrospect) statements. Considering the great convulsion to come (WWI) it has something to say about not...
Published 5 months ago by Robin J. Thomson

versus
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Reader Beware
This translation represents a savagely cut edition of the original, which has been reduced from 478 pages to 304. This fact is nowhere mentioned by the publisher.
Published on 30 Jan 2005


Most Helpful First | Newest First

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Reader Beware, 30 Jan 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Man of Straw (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics) (Mass Market Paperback)
This translation represents a savagely cut edition of the original, which has been reduced from 478 pages to 304. This fact is nowhere mentioned by the publisher.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Frighteningly prescient and still relevant, 11 April 2014
By 
Robin J. Thomson (Scotland - Home of the English language) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Man of Straw (Hardcover)
This is not a plot synopsis - which can be found elsewhere. Written by Thomas Mann's elder brother this novella -released in 1913- is frighteningly prescient. A relatively slim volume, it is a good read with a few laughs, moments of great pathos and some chilling (in retrospect) statements. Considering the great convulsion to come (WWI) it has something to say about not just its own time but also the attitudes of many Germans throughout the history of the (then) still young nation. It also quite accurately predicts the direction in which Germany was to head in the years 1918-1945. A very readable novel, though not particularly subtle, that makes you wish he had written more...It is certainly better than the insipid work of his better known brother.
Written in third person narrative it is the story of one young man's growth through the late years of the 19th century and early years of the twentieth. If you enjoyed Hesse's 'Steppenwolf' then you may enjoy this. Though both are modernist works this is far more in the realist mold. It also shares some of the characteristics of Isherwood's "Berlin Novels" and Nabokov's realist works.
Florian Illes description of the novel in his great book "1913" is slightly misleading so it is better to read and decide for yourself. Enjoy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Biting satire on Imperial Germany, 3 Feb 2005
This review is from: Man of Straw (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics) (Mass Market Paperback)
Heinrich Mann - brother of Thomas - produced a trilogy of satirical novels on Imperial Germany, of which Man of Straw is the first.
The novel presents the progression of the vacuous and amoral but ardent imperialist Diederich Hesseling from hapless student to successful and dominant burgher of a wholly unappealing, second rate town in the nether regions of the Second Reich. Evincing a powerful blend of vacuity and opportunism, Hesseling inevitably gets the girl and the power, whilst playing a part in crushing the worthy and the good along the way. This book was banned by the Nazis - in itself a recommendation.
The book is not without its faults, however. The description of the social milieu requires the reader to recall a large cast of characters, many of highly verbose ciphers. Whilst this translation may indeed be a highly edited version of the original, I for one can understand why.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Man of Straw (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics)
Man of Straw (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics) by Heinrich Mann (Mass Market Paperback - 28 May 1992)
Used & New from: 0.66
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews