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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars good reading, excellent bargain
The book is brilliant, despite 20 years gap since it was originally published. If you have never read anything by Martin Amis, read this one. The purchase is an absolute bargain.
Published on 28 Jun 2009 by Andrew Stys

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected
I read the blurb on the back of the book and various reviews that are available (not just on Amazon) and I expected a collection of short stories about nuclear weapons. I suppose I got that, but not at all in the style that I anticipated.

This book is an intellectual exercise rather than entertainment. The opening essay is the best part of the book, arguing...
Published 23 months ago by Andy Phillips


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected, 20 July 2012
By 
Andy Phillips (Leicestershire, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Einstein's Monsters (Penguin fiction) (Paperback)
I read the blurb on the back of the book and various reviews that are available (not just on Amazon) and I expected a collection of short stories about nuclear weapons. I suppose I got that, but not at all in the style that I anticipated.

This book is an intellectual exercise rather than entertainment. The opening essay is the best part of the book, arguing why it makes no sense to develop and maintain a nuclear arsenal. After that I felt that things went down hill. There are five stories, and I found four of them a struggle to finish despite their short length. It's not that the stories are badly written but only one has any obvious relevance to nuclear weapons. It's not that the message went over my head and I understand that the stories are allegorical and not necessarily to be taken literally, but I found it all a bit too much work. The book isn't bad as such, it's just no fun to read.

If you're expecting typical apocalyptic fiction then forget this book, but if you want something to think about then this might be up your street. I hated it, but I think it's probably a good book if you like this sort of thing.
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2.0 out of 5 stars A huge dissapointment for me., 27 Aug 2013
By 
Philip Mayo - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
First, let me say that I am a big fan of Martin Amis, so it pains me to write what follows.

The title, the author tells us in the introduction, refers to nuclear weapons, and to ourselves: "We are Einstein's monsters, not fully human, not for now.", presumably dehumanised by nuclear weapons, and/or our fear of them, and/or our willingness to countenance using them, although this is not made clear.

This collection consists of 5 short stories preceded by a quite lengthy introduction. The stated purpose of the collection is to make a case against nuclear weapons, against their existence and against their use. The introduction makes this case strongly and well. The stories, in my opinion, do not.

The first two stories are quite readable, not breathtaking, but not bad.

I have no idea whatsoever what the third story "Time" is about. To me it is nonsense. Tripe. It just means - nothing. And I am not a fool - (honours English graduate in my day etc.).

The fourth story "The little Puppy That Could" reads like an adult, science-fiction fairy tale - a cross between Little Red Riding Hood and Mad Max - not good, not very original.

"The Immortals", the final story is a little better, but still not particularly moving or interesting.

I have read, and loved, a lot of MA's works including most of his novels and most of his non-fiction works. Some of these, including his autobiography "Experience" and his novel "Time's arrow" I would count as two of the very best books that I have ever read. So this collection comes as a huge disappointment to me. Perhaps the failing is mine. If so, I apologise to MA and to his fans, but would say again, I am one of his biggest fans. But not in this case.
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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Our world with all the benefits of nuclear war, 30 Jan 2001
This review is from: Einstein's Monsters (Paperback)
Einstein's Monsters is about the nuclear world. A collection of short stories that terrorize the mind and brutalize concepts of reality, it seeps paranoia. The fear is not of death itself, but the type of horrendous death only possible by nuclear war. Amis is a wordsmith and language is his strongest suit. The language here has all the coiled power of his subject matter, and it gropes towards solutions which can't exist, in short stories that are abortive, elliptical and unfulfilling. There are no words to describe the possibilities of a nuclear winter. Einstein's Monsters gets all this and more. Worth reading.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars good reading, excellent bargain, 28 Jun 2009
By 
Andrew Stys - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Einstein's Monsters (Paperback)
The book is brilliant, despite 20 years gap since it was originally published. If you have never read anything by Martin Amis, read this one. The purchase is an absolute bargain.
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Einstein's Monsters (Penguin fiction)
Einstein's Monsters (Penguin fiction) by Martin Amis (Paperback - 26 May 1988)
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