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5.0 out of 5 stars The Cat-nappers!
P.G. Wodehouse's best stories are invariably those that involve the butler Jeeves helping the scatterbrained and easy-living Bertie Wooster escape from the fickle hand of fate and his own pranks. Aunts Aren't Gentlemen focuses on Bertie being at the wrong place at the wrong time and being constantly in the soup because of what others do. He valiantly launches forward and...
Published on 7 Sept. 2004 by Donald Mitchell

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Wodehouse has lost his sparkle
In his earlier Jeeves books, Wodehouse wrote perfect caricatures of the British aristocracy - that is, although exaggerated, one could suspend disbelief and imagine that the characters were real and authentic. However, by the time he wrote "Aunts Aren't Gentlemen", Wodehouse seems to have spent too many years living in the States, and to have forgotten how English people...
Published on 12 Oct. 2008 by Dave Rado


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5.0 out of 5 stars The Cat-nappers!, 7 Sept. 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Aunts aren't Gentlemen (Hardcover)
P.G. Wodehouse's best stories are invariably those that involve the butler Jeeves helping the scatterbrained and easy-living Bertie Wooster escape from the fickle hand of fate and his own pranks. Aunts Aren't Gentlemen focuses on Bertie being at the wrong place at the wrong time and being constantly in the soup because of what others do. He valiantly launches forward and needs less help than usual to remain the carefree bachelor about town.
The Cat-nappers starts off innocently enough as Bertie finds himself with disturbing pink spots on his chest. Seeking out a physician's counsel, Bertie gets more than he bargained for when he bumps into Vanessa Cook (who had turned down his marriage proposal the year before) and O.J. (Orlo) Porter (former dorm mate at Oxford who favored left-wing causes) as they lead a protest march that stalls Bertie's car. Porter hops in the car to escape the Bobbies and sells Bertie some life insurance. Porter turns out to be in love with Ms. Cook and is very jealous of anyone who might have an interest in her. At the doctor's office, Bertie runs into Major Plank who had once tried to have Bertie arrested. Fortunately, Plank cannot remember who he is . . . but it's a narrow escape. The doctor tells Bertie the spots will go away, but Bertie's health needs are not being met. He suggests a trip to someplace quiet in the country.
Naturally, Bertie thinks of his Aunt Dahlia and the wonderful meals he always enjoys when he visits her. But she's off visiting elsewhere. She does offer to take a cottage for Bertie so he can visit with her.
Once there, things go badly downhill. Naturally, Bertie does it to himself to some extent. Ignoring Jeeves's advice, he takes a wrong turn and ends up with a nasty scare. From there, the complications build to their humorous conclusion as cat thieves, bettors, lovers, churchmen and angry horsemen blunder about in silly circles that provide much delight to the reader. Naturally, Bertie's always at the wrong place at the wrong time . . . but at the right place at the right time to make us laugh!
One of the special charms of this story is that Bertie tries very hard to do the right thing . . . and finds it exceptionally difficult to do so.
As the book ends, Bertie notes that the problems with the world boil down to the comment that "Aunts Aren't Gentlemen."
Peace is what you carry with you.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Wodehouse has lost his sparkle, 12 Oct. 2008
By 
Dave Rado - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Aunts aren't Gentlemen (Paperback)
In his earlier Jeeves books, Wodehouse wrote perfect caricatures of the British aristocracy - that is, although exaggerated, one could suspend disbelief and imagine that the characters were real and authentic. However, by the time he wrote "Aunts Aren't Gentlemen", Wodehouse seems to have spent too many years living in the States, and to have forgotten how English people actually speak. The dialog and narrative read as if the characters are Americans rather than English aristocrats, almost every sentence contains at least one word or phrase that no English aristocrat would ever utter, and in addition, the dialog is much less witty than in the earlier books - the sparkle has gone. Very disappointing.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Last Entry to the Jeeves and Wooster Stable., 4 July 2008
This review is from: Aunts aren't Gentlemen (Paperback)
In `Aunts Aren't Gentlemen' an out of sorts Bertie retires to We Nook in Maiden Eggesford where his Aunt Dahlia is staying with Jimmy Briscoe whilst Major Plank is staying with Pop Cook. We previously met Major Plank in the company of Uncle Fred at Ashenden Manor in `Uncle Dynamite' and with Wooster and Jeeves in `Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves' when he formed the impression that Bertie was international thief Alpine Joe.

Both Briscoe and Cook have horses running in the Jubilee Stakes with the populous undecided as to which of them will be first to break the tape. Cook's horse, Potato Chip, has formed an attachment to a cat which Bertie is accused of stealing. Further complications arise from Cook's daughter Vanessa breaking her engagement to Orlo Porter and getting Bertie to act as a stand in.

A beautifully crafted if brief farce which although not being amongst the best of the Jeeves and Wooster novels is till a worthy member of the cannon as Jeeves and Wodehouse struggle to reunite boy and girl and horse and cat before Bertie is dragged in front of either a clergyman or a magistrate.
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3.0 out of 5 stars P.G going through the motions, 18 Aug. 2010
This review is from: Aunts aren't Gentlemen (Paperback)
I guess Wodehouse and his characters are so much a part of our world, even in the twenty-first century, that we feel we know his work even if we haven't read any of it. I came to him quite late and was surprised to discover that not only was he staggeringly prolific -nobody seems to know exactly how many books he actually wrote - but that he also kept on writing right up until his death in 1975. I was also surprised to discover that by no means all of his books are set in the first decade of the twentieth-century as the nineties' Jeeves and Wooster TV series would have you believe. Instead he set them pretty much as he wrote them and so this one, part of the J and W series, is set in the 1970s. It is standard Wodehouse fare, full of misunderstanding and all round hi-jinks and buffoonery. Not exactly vintage but still a pleasant way of whiling away a few hours if only for the passage where Bertie first casually encounters the all-important feline and subsequently his old nemesis Major Plank. Even average Wodehouse knocks the spots off everyone else.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simple Pleasures, 19 Jun. 2003
This review is from: Aunts aren't Gentlemen (Paperback)
With summer about your ears, there are few better things than a large gin and a copy of Aunts aren't gentleman. A plot from the top drawer of farce keeps everything tight and as usual Plum's way with a turn of phrase make for a sheer joy.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Cat-nappers!, 7 Sept. 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Aunts aren't Gentlemen (Paperback)
P.G. Wodehouse's best stories are invariably those that involve the butler Jeeves helping the scatterbrained and easy-living Bertie Wooster escape from the fickle hand of fate and his own pranks. Aunts Aren't Gentlemen focuses on Bertie being at the wrong place at the wrong time and being constantly in the soup because of what others do. He valiantly launches forward and needs less help than usual to remain the carefree bachelor about town.
The Cat-nappers starts off innocently enough as Bertie finds himself with disturbing pink spots on his chest. Seeking out a physician's counsel, Bertie gets more than he bargained for when he bumps into Vanessa Cook (who had turned down his marriage proposal the year before) and O.J. (Orlo) Porter (former dorm mate at Oxford who favored left-wing causes) as they lead a protest march that stalls Bertie's car. Porter hops in the car to escape the Bobbies and sells Bertie some life insurance. Porter turns out to be in love with Ms. Cook and is very jealous of anyone who might have an interest in her. At the doctor's office, Bertie runs into Major Plank who had once tried to have Bertie arrested. Fortunately, Plank cannot remember who he is . . . but it's a narrow escape. The doctor tells Bertie the spots will go away, but Bertie's health needs are not being met. He suggests a trip to someplace quiet in the country.
Naturally, Bertie thinks of his Aunt Dahlia and the wonderful meals he always enjoys when he visits her. But she's off visiting elsewhere. She does offer to take a cottage for Bertie so he can visit with her.
Once there, things go badly downhill. Naturally, Bertie does it to himself to some extent. Ignoring Jeeves's advice, he takes a wrong turn and ends up with a nasty scare. From there, the complications build to their humorous conclusion as cat thieves, bettors, lovers, churchmen and angry horsemen blunder about in silly circles that provide much delight to the reader. Naturally, Bertie's always at the wrong place at the wrong time . . . but at the right place at the right time to make us laugh!
One of the special charms of this story is that Bertie tries very hard to do the right thing . . . and finds it exceptionally difficult to do so.
As the book ends, Bertie notes that the problems with the world boil down to the comment that "Aunts Aren't Gentlemen."
Peace is what you carry with you.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fabbbbbbbbbbb, 19 Jun. 2005
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This review is from: Aunts aren't Gentlemen (Paperback)
but then what else can you say about jeeves and wooster. once again old bertie gets into a sticky situation and jeeves has to worm him out but not before bertie has an unfortunate run in with an ex fiancee, and a rather odd old general who's convinced that bertie is a wanted criminal intent on stealing cats!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wodehouse and Callow the perfect mix, 1 Nov. 2008
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Simon Callow is far and away the best narrator of the Jeeves & Wooster stories. He voices the characters to perfection. Don't Waste your time with any other narrator.You will listen again and again.
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5.0 out of 5 stars vintage wodehouse, 3 July 2013
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Totally biased as i am a jeeves and wooster obsessive -this is a classic one with lots of aunt action -as ever funny clever and with fabulously quirky language whats not to love
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5.0 out of 5 stars I love the narrator, 2 Feb. 2015
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I love the narrator, I can only listen to his readings of P G Wodehouse, it has to be him. Good story, but I do love Jeeves and Wooster.
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Aunts aren't Gentlemen
Aunts aren't Gentlemen by P. G. Wodehouse (Paperback - 24 Feb. 1977)
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