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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the best
"Someone like you" was the last Roald Dahld's book that I've read. I came across it by chance, but now I realize that I was lucky.
I've been reading many other books of that amazing, wonderful writer, but I have to say that it was one of my favourites.
Despite the fact that it isn't the fastest-moving book that I've ever read, the author mantains his intriguing,...
Published on 21 April 2011 by lagouge

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Ah, Roald...
So, I love Roald Dahl, to start with. Unfortunately, I do have some criticism towards this book. The stories are well written, the book is very interesting, however, none of them have that culmination and none of them, I think, actually end in a surprising way. If only he put just that 10% more of imagination, although, who am I to say.
Published 4 months ago by Alisa


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the best, 21 April 2011
By 
lagouge (Oxford, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Someone Like You (Paperback)
"Someone like you" was the last Roald Dahld's book that I've read. I came across it by chance, but now I realize that I was lucky.
I've been reading many other books of that amazing, wonderful writer, but I have to say that it was one of my favourites.
Despite the fact that it isn't the fastest-moving book that I've ever read, the author mantains his intriguing, gripping style although it's a book of short stories.
In these fifteen narrations we can look deeply into the feelings of the ordinary people and try to understand their behaviour. You may think that the characters are quite old fashioned, but in fact, in some ways, we are like them. I guess that the differences are the situations that they have to overcome, because I'm sure that most of us would act in the same way.
You can also learn about different cultures, social classes, dressing, animals and even food!
I recommend this book to everybody, all ages and cultures, especially if you don't have enough time for reading or just if you hate boring, heavy-going stories. I would like to encourage everybody to have the opportunity to read this book, you won't regret it!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Fun, 15 Jan 2010
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M. Dowden (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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At last Roald Dahl has made it into the Penguin Modern Classics series, and it is about time too. If like me, you have probably read these tales many times before, and I think that most if not all of those presented here have been filmed in that great TV series 'Tales of the Unexpected'.

In this selection you have many great tales showing how wonderful Roald Dahl was at story-telling. Sometimes we are prone to forget that he was great at short stories for the more mature market, as most emphasis is placed on his children’s stories. Here he shows how to create suspense, whether it is with stories of bizarre bets or an everyday occurrence. He sometimes gives us unusual twists, and other times not, leading you always to wonder what is coming next. Some of these tales are quite macabre, most are quite dark and he writes them with such aplomb, in some cases recreating that greatest of short story writers, Saki.

I have read all his adult stories so many times that I usually can remember what is going to happen in most of these, but even so that doesn't detract from them. Of course if you are reading them for the very first time then I envy you. What is certain though is that once you have read these you will want to read them many times more. Reading these Dahl tales is like having a box of chocolates to yourself, you want to curl up in peace and quiet and revel in them.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Ah, Roald..., 8 May 2014
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So, I love Roald Dahl, to start with. Unfortunately, I do have some criticism towards this book. The stories are well written, the book is very interesting, however, none of them have that culmination and none of them, I think, actually end in a surprising way. If only he put just that 10% more of imagination, although, who am I to say.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Mysterious stories, 9 Feb 2013
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Several mysterious and gruesome stories by Roald Dahl which will keep you guessing until the end.I really like the way these collection of short stories were written.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Gambling and cheating, 2 Feb 2013
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This review is from: Someone Like You (Audio CD)
Someone Like You, which was first published in 1953, collects eighteen short stories for adults by Roald Dahl.

There is great variety in terms of setting and technique but two common themes are gambling and cheating. Often these are combined: a bet will be placed and one, or both, of the parties to the bet will try to manipulate the result by underhand means. Like a murder mystery, the set-up of a bet, whose result will be revealed by the end, is a reliable method of creating narrative tension. Nearly all the stories are engaging.

In some tales there is a sense of anti-climax: the fuse burns but the firework fails to explode. In others the ending is entirely satisfactory. My favourites in this collection were Dip in the Pool, which concerns a bet on how long a cruise ship will take to arrive at its destination; the Galloping Foxley, which makes use of Dahl's schooldays at Repton; and The Great Automatic Grammatizator, an irresistable tale about a machine which writes stories mechanically.

(A curious footnote in literary history: the great English writers Roald Dahl and Denton Welch both attended Repton in the 1930s. Entirely predictably, Dahl bullied Welch.)
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10 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Surprised in the end ......, 6 Feb 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Someone Like You (Paperback)
This book (Someone Like You) was gifted to me by my friends. I read the first story and it had a kind of uncanny ending. After that there was no doubt about the writer's ability to end dramatically - for instance the story titled 'Man from the south'.
The writer, Roald Dahl, excels in the art of building the drama and suspense and very often a
character makes an appearance only to end the story and you are left wondering as in 'The wish'-
where the mother appears only at the end.
I presumed that all the stories would have the
same heightened sense of excitement but twice they
failed my expectations. But, still the stories were worth a reading.
I would like to encourage the readers to read
a story a day ,and then ponder, to grasp the full depth of author's command over building situations
and the dramatic climax.
The book is nicely printed and easy to carry -
so much so that I used to read it on my way back home from school.
Highly recommended....
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Someone Like You - Something for everyone? *****SPOILER ALERT ****, 18 Jun 2012
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I recently purchased "Someone Like You" to read for my local book club and everyone in the group seemed to have a different reaction to this strange and slightly disturbing book.
The book is a selection of short stories, some of which make an interesting read and some of which seem a tad pointless.
My favourite story is " Man from the South". In this story, a gentleman bets another that he can strike his lighter ten times. If he wins, he gets to win a car but if he does not suceed, he loses his finger. Towards the end of the story, the older man's wife comes along to drag him away and as she is apologising, you notice that, she, also has fingers missing.

"The Wish" is also a particular favourite. On first read, it almost seems a pointless story, but on reflection, the story of a little boy making deals with himself if he crosses the red sea reminds us of our childhood and the games we played.

" My lady, my Dove" leaves the reader disappointed and expecting more. The story starts off with a couple laying a trap for their guests by putting a microphone in their room and planning to listen into their conversation later in the evening after a game of bridge. After the game, they listen and discover that the other couple had been trying to cheat. That's it. I was expecting a lot more.

You will find that the stories are slightly dated, but I think that this is part of its charm. Starting reading with an open mind, I was not sure what to expect. I had been told that it was a little bit different and I was not disappointed.
If you are not a fan of short stories, I would not recommend this as I was always left wanting more.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A short story master, 20 Oct 2013
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Dahl was probably the first author I really loved, could not get enough of him as a kid. Now am older is fun reading his adult stories, though these would probably be suitable for teenagers as well. A nice selection here, some darker than others. I think Skin was the best. The stories often have a twist at the end and all leave you satisfied.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very Dated, 6 Aug 2011
Not much evidence of Dahl's genius for writing children's books in this cruel collection of slightly dated tales of the unexpected. As HG Wells said, if you read this kind of short story when you are 11 it will stay with you forever. But I'm not 11....

If you grew up in the late 70s you may recall the TV show 'Tales of the Unexpected' which was based on the stories in this book; and they are about as dated in style as 70's Black Forest Gateaux with Liebfraumilch to wash it down.

Much to my surprise, being a fan of Dahl's children's books, he reveals himself here as a slightly second rate wordsmith, good enough to keep you engaged but not someone you would read just for the pleasure of the way words form on the page. What keeps up the interest is the twisted plots he puts together - both in the sense that they are unexpected and that they are rather perverse and dark. I'm not sure that Dahl can have been altogether a nice person. The man who bets his car against someone's finger for example, or the woman who tops her husband with a frozen joint of lamb and lets the police eat the evidence. These stories remind me a lot of science fiction shorts, which hinge on a big reveal and an unexpected and thought provoking outcome. HG Well's compendium, 'The Country of The Blind' is similar in feel but Wells is a far better writer.

One extraordinary point about these stories is how dated the manners and lifestyles of the actors now appear. More dated than characters from Dickens or Trollope I would say. This must be partly because of the world Dahl inhabited but also I suspect because he uses manners and mannerisms to - as he sees it - set up atmosphere rather than to drive forward the plot, so that the feel of period lies heavily on his work (which you may like). The one oddity in his very upper middle class cast of characters is the dog story at the end, which shows an extraordinary knowledge of working class, country greyhound races and techniques for cheating. Dahl was clearly a complex and interesting person. It's a shame he aimed so low in literary terms but perhaps he kept his genius reserved for kids.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars was a replacement not to read, 21 Nov 2013
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it was not for me. it was a replacement for one the dog ate. condition was good and it came promptly
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Someone Like You
Someone Like You by Roald Dahl (Paperback - 1970)
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