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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved it.
Davis Miller's book is a wonderful read. I've read many, many books on Bruce and I found that the way Miller blends his own life with Bruce's to be especially interesting, enabling the reader to identify with the author. Yes, the first part of the book deals with Miller's earlier years, but at the same time many bits of info about Lee, and Muhammad Ali (who Lee and the...
Published on 24 Jan 2001

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good introductory insight with a different slant
It's a strange book of two halves; the first a mini auto biog of how Bruce Lee (and Ali) affected the author as he was growing up, the second half concentrating more on delivering Bruce Lee 'facts'. It's an interesting read although it does jump around unnervingly at times. The analysis on Lee's life is almost too concise, as if the author was afraid to get anything...
Published on 31 Mar 2000


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved it., 24 Jan 2001
By A Customer
Davis Miller's book is a wonderful read. I've read many, many books on Bruce and I found that the way Miller blends his own life with Bruce's to be especially interesting, enabling the reader to identify with the author. Yes, the first part of the book deals with Miller's earlier years, but at the same time many bits of info about Lee, and Muhammad Ali (who Lee and the author both admire(d)-Miller has also written "The Tao of Muhammad Ali") are sprinkled throughout. The latter half of the book serves as a fresh biography of Lee. He is not presented as a god, but as a human. It is presented in a matter-of-fact way, and lets you form your own opinions or conclusions. Probably how Lee himself would have liked it. I recommend anyone, fan(atic) or no, read this book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No way as way, 21 Aug 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Tao Of Bruce Lee (Paperback)
Enter The Dragon was on UK television about a week ago and although I'd seen the film several times it was a different experience having read this book. Miller is an extraordinary writer, perhaps one of the best in history. A ruthlessly honest, genuinely moving and truly inspirational book. If you think you'll like this, you probably will.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars martial arts "Catcher in the Rye" as well as best Lee book, 3 May 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Tao Of Bruce Lee (Paperback)
A beautifully written story about the intersection of Lee's life with Miller's, about the ways Miller was influenced by Lee, and about the downsides (the costs) of obsessively pursuing fame. A unique and terrific piece of writing -- both a fine memoir of Miller's martial arts experiences and the only good writing ever about Lee. Miller is a Yank Nick Hornby -- or maybe a Yank Hornby who is known only in the UK. There's no indication this book has been published here in the US, which is strange since "Tao of Bruce Lee" and "Tao of Muhammad Ali" are both such marvelously innocent American stories. This is a beautiful read for anyone who cares about good writing and storytelling.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Refeshing!, 24 Jan 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Tao Of Bruce Lee (Paperback)
Davis Miller's book is a wonderful read. I've read many, many books on Bruce and I found that the way Miller blends his own life with Bruce's to be especially interesting, enabling the reader to identify with the author. Yes, the first part of the book deals with Miller's earlier years, but at the same time many bits of info about Lee, and Muhammad Ali (who Lee and the author both admire(d)-Miller has also written "The Tao of Muhammad Ali") are sprinkled throughout. The latter half of the book serves as a fresh biography of Lee. He is not presented as a god, but as a human. It is presented in a matter-of-fact way, and lets you form your own opinions or conclusions. Probably how Lee himself would have liked it. I recommend anyone, fan(atic) or no, read this book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last a book on Lee from a REAL Author!, 21 Mar 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Tao Of Bruce Lee (Paperback)
Davis Miller combines a biography of Bruce Lee with the story of how he himself faced oppression as a youngster growing up in North Carolina. Fantastic reading from a brilliant author that keeps you on the edge of your seat, not only to find out some truths about Bruce Lee but also to follow the progress of the young 'foetus' Miller. 5 star reading from a 5 star author!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Tao of Bruce Lee...A Pleasant Surprise, 21 Mar 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Tao Of Bruce Lee (Paperback)
The Tao of Bruce Lee is not what I had thought ,but I was more than pleasantly surprised. I was expecting a biography what I got was a highly motivational book. Our hero,Davis Miller,takes us through his life and then through Bruce Lee's life. He draws nice comparisons between the two. We see Bruce Lee become human and Davis Miller become the real hero
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What doesn't kill you makes you stronger, 12 July 2002
This review is from: The Tao Of Bruce Lee (Paperback)
In The Tao of Bruce Lee Davis Miller attempts to strip away the layers of myth which have encased, and almost obliterated, the real story of Bruce Lee. The result of his efforts is a broader and more honest portrait of a man with an often-complex character. Miller also reappraises the frequently hidden extent of Lee's success, stating that, 'he became the first truly international film luminary'. Bruce lee's status, argues Miller, is comparable to other famous victims of ' the doomed pursuit of the (American) dream'. This roll-call includes fictional figures such as Scott Fitzgerald's Gatsby to the all too human icons of James Dean, Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe and Muhammad Ali.
Miller charts Lee's life from his birth in San Francisco in 1940 to his untimely death thirty-three years later in Hong Kong. During the journey various myths are debunked. For example, Lee, far from being an only child brought up by an impoverished and widowed father, as portrayed in the film biography Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story, came, in fact, from a show-business family, complete with a mother, and four siblings. Also, the myths surrounding Lee's early life which portray him as being the 'baddest boy in the Crown Colony' are rather questionable. The young Lee had to be 'encouraged' to finish a roof-top contest, and was in reality more interested in dancing, acting and girls than martial arts. However, Miller is perhaps at his most interesting when he attempts to unravel the events surrounding the final three years of Lee's life in Hong Kong. The picture painted is of a man living mentally and physically at full stretch.
The path Miller takes with the book is in the form of a personal journey through his own coming of age story. This path is interwoven with the impact Bruce Lee made on the self-described 'geek' from North Carolina. For fans there is perhaps a temptation to skim the first part of the book to get to the more meaty details of Lee's life and death. However, this would be a shame since Miller offers some revealing insights into the flip-side of the American dream for life's outsiders; outsiders who dream of cars and girls, and fitting in, but, never quite make it. Although Miller tried his best to fit, for example, at Mount Tabor high school, he describes his wardrobe as consisting of co-ordinating golf caps and rows of almost fetish-like shinny shoes, he remained, in spite of all his sartorial efforts, an outsider.
My only criticisms of the book are slight; a few well chosen photographs would have been a plus, also the dream-type passages are frankly annoying. Overall however, Davis Miller's The Tao of Bruce Lee lives up to the blurb on the back cover. It is a unique and compelling book, just as enjoyable to re-read as it is to discover for the first time.
All quotes taken from,
The Tao of Bruce Lee, by Davis Miller. (Vintage, 2000).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved it, 21 Mar 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Tao Of Bruce Lee (Paperback)
What a wonderful book, by an amazing author - can't wait for his next book. Bruce Lee has never before been looked at like this, coupled with the touching real-life story behind it...any Bruce fan can identify with it.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How much do Bruce fans really know about him?, 6 Jun 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Tao Of Bruce Lee (Paperback)
I have always been a huge Bruce Lee fan, I have read the books and watched the churned out documentaries, these combined have created the "myth of Bruce Lee", most of which I beleived. Davis Miller manages to deconstruct some of these myths without destoying the legend. It has been long overdue that someone should portray Lee as he was and give an honest evaluation of the man. The book is extremely well written and easy to read, I finished it in a couple of hours. The story centers around Millers adolescence and the lead up to his discovery of Lee and how this began to change his life. It is a very powerful story of a man's desire to change and better himself, to follow his idols, idols that just dont exist anymore. This book also compliments his first work "Tao of Muhammad Ali" perfectly and presents 2 sides to the same story. It is possible to read and fully enjoy just one, but I recommend both, as the Ali book now means a lot more to me since reading the Lee book. You will not get a more honest account of Bruce Lee.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A story of growing up through our heroes and mentors, 3 Feb 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Tao Of Bruce Lee (Paperback)
This author also wrote an excellent book on Muhammed Ali. He really gets to the essence of what Bruce Lee probably really was like. He did this through a lot of research and interviews. The difference between this one and the one on Ali is that he actually met Ali many times and formed a good relationship with him and could really get to the nature of the Greatest. Whereas Bruce Lee is long since dead, therefore parts of the book are more like a straight bio.
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The Tao Of Bruce Lee
The Tao Of Bruce Lee by Davis Miller (Paperback - 6 Jan 2000)
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