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4.6 out of 5 stars
Dust: (Wool Trilogy 3)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 14 November 2013
"Dust" by Hugh Howey is the third part of Silo Trilogy, SF dystopian series in some way similar to the Hunger games series.

Therefore this novel should be looked as part of a whole, and certainly is recommended to read the first two parts of series before its read.
Its two prequels introduced readers to underground Silo where remained human survivors live, one safe shelter that is also sort of prison due to people inability to exit to the outer toxic world.

For those already familiar with story, in the aftermath of the uprising described in its prequels, the people of Silo 18 are learning to live with a new order. Some of them will accept the changes while others are in fear due to lack of control of their fate.
Although the battle has been won, the war for Silo is just beginning because it's still in danger and Jules who want it to destroy it have to be stopped...

As I already mentioned, this novel should be looked at as the part of the series. The series introduced nice and believable characters, and good tension that encourages the reader for further reading.
As both previously released novels, this SF dystopian piece is also well-written and exciting read that is easily read.

Although, "Dust", if viewed separately from the series, somehow lost some of series tension probably because of the characters who reached their development peak and nothing new can be learned about the fate of "lost" silos, or of their engineering in general, although reader can still enjoy in author's intriguing world.

The end could be also disappointment for some series' fans because this novel didn't completely concluded the story in same time leaving the possibility that one day this story will be continued...

As someone who enjoyed Silo series I can fully recommend you to read this novel together with two of its prequels and enjoy (for the last time?) in Howey's well-described post apocalyptic world of silos...
Especially if you're fan of post apocalyptic literature and science fiction in general, I suggest giving chance to Silo trilogy, you'll most certainly like it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 30 July 2014
A highly readable conclusion to the trilogy, but it's obvious Howey was working himself hard to finish up: it doesn't flow with quite the surprising bits and alien-ness of the earlier books, part of whose joy came from experiencing the very truncated world of the silo dwellers through their eyes and emotional biases.

By this time we're heavily invested in the main character, and Howey doesn't have a choice in what she does, really - a different ending would've meant too many bad folk not getting their just desserts - but the book still works, and it's satisfying enough. Perhaps its most commendable point is how a "good" character ended up "bad" through no real fault of his own.. but continued being "bad" because of his investment in the system he was part of. Which, let's face it, is how a great many people go bad.

Overall, not quite as absorbing as Wool and Shift, but a good solid read and clearly into that 0.3% of Kindle novels (beyond the third Standard Deviation) that are worth more than the time you put into them.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on 2 November 2013
I was a little disappointed in this book the third in the series, the others kept me gripped right the way through. This one felt like the author took the money and ran, in comparison to the others I felt the plot line was weak and went nowhere. This is not a stand alone book, you need to read the others first. I was so looking forward to it that I paid a lot for it, my advise wait for it to be in the sale
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 18 March 2014
Reasonable conclusion to an at times excellent trilogy. It feels a little like Howey is just running out of steam by the end. A couple of neat little twists, but generally it's fairly predictable as the series ambles to a conclusion. Entertaining enough, but still I can't help feeling that some of the earlier promise has gone unfulfilled.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 11 January 2015
'm a big fan of this trilogy (although you could call it book 9 as the first two were released in novella segments). I think the first book in the series, Wool, is perhaps the most enjoyable book I've read in the last five years. The second installment, Shift, was strong, but for me not quite up there with the first. This is the conclusion, and while I won't quite give it five stars it comes pretty close.

It is a very satisfying conclusion to the post-apocalyptic world of people living in an underground silo (reasons unclear). But Hugh Howey demonstrates the cruelty and beauty of life in equal measures, sometime verging towards too much sentimentality (a pet puppy) and other times showing scant regard for readers emotional investment in some characters. But I liked that, life is tough and you grasp the moments of beauty as you can.

His characters are not faultless heroes, and there is plenty of reflection at the end on whether the choices made were the right ones.

Not all plot threads are resolved, which is fine, not sure if that is due to editing, just a reflection of life, or a careful way of leaving the door open for him to return to this world in a future book or series. But there were a couple of threads of plot I would like to have seen developed.

So not quite five stars, but pretty damn close, and I recommend the trilogy to anyone who enjoys a bit of dystopian sci-fi.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 26 June 2014
I liked this trilogy more and more as it went along. Its a pretty depressing view of both the near future and of mankind. As much as I hate happy endings these three books constantly failed to deliver anything but misery and left me craving for something to cheer. The characters weren't particularly likable and there aren't really any hero's or much love interest but its still a book I couldn't put down. I had more hope in their future then they had. There's a neat twist about the cause of the continued barrenness of the earth that I like but I felt this wasn't exploited into the ending enough, which in the end was a little too convenient.
If your the sort of person that worries about new technology going terribly wrong then this alarmist tale about nanotechnology will add strength to your beliefs but if on the other hand you see there is little evidence that it ever does, then its an entertaining tale about society driven by irrational human fears.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 30 July 2014
No spoilers I promise. A brilliant journey, each book contains a story, not immediately nor easily identified as being interconnected, and many surprising twists occur. This isn't some cheap, leave the reader frustrated over every cliffhanger, never fully delivering story, but an enthralling path to see what will happen next. I particularly enjoy authors who use life's joys and despair, which has been used very effectively to give these books real value-not some fairy tale fantasy but a gritty book that looks at human nature. A new author to me, one I will be keen to follow.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 13 April 2014
"Every Beginning Has An End"

I was dreading this book in a way, I knew it was the last in this glorious series (but I needn't have worried see Karma of the Silo) but I did want to see what happened to the people stuck in the godforsaken silos deep underground.

I don't want to spoil things so I wont go in to too much detail about the third book but after the scene being set in Wool and then the devastating truth behind the silo's being revealed in Shift, Dust finished the trilogy in an almost satisfying way.

The book concentrates on the inhabitants of Silo's 18, 17 and 1. We know Silo 1 basically has the power to end any of the silo's, we know silo 17 is on its last legs and silo 18 has a population in danger of being finished off by Silo 1.

Now don't get me wrong I love the whole WOOLiverse but I think there are still a lot of unanswered questions and also the fact that we know there is more than just the one silo, I would love to hear about what happened to them but I also understand he cant keep writing about the same thing, where would he stop?

However as briefly mentioned above, Karma of the Silo and a lot of other books have appeared in the WOOLiverse and they are not just brilliant but they fill in questions that Howey has not answered and they also come with Howey's approval.

What this series has introduced me to is the brilliant imagination of Hugh Howey and having started reading his next series - Sand, I cannot wait to see what he has planned for the future.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 12 November 2013
Over the course of 2013, one of my favourite and most intense reading experiences has been the sequence of extraordinary dystopian novels, Wool. Partly written as novellas, now coerced together into a near perfect whole, and partly developed as more lengthy explorations of the minds of those who live within the buried, noisy, metal silos, controlling their destiny or victim of it, the trilogy is now ready to end. Following Wool and Shift is Dust. Each novel is named so well, including the last. Now it's time to look outside the claustrophobic cylinders towards their surrounding post-apocalyptic landscape of dust.

It would be impossible to read Dust (and reviews of it) without having first read Wool (Wool Trilogy 1) and its successor, albeit a prequel, Shift: (Wool Trilogy 2) (Wool Trilogy Prequel).

In Wool and Shift the world of the silo is brought vividly into focus as are the lives of the men and women who have to live this way consigned to one of over ninety floors, all linked by porters who run up and down the mammoth central staircase, passing messages between farms, engineering, schools, IT, law, hospitals and homes. We have seen what happens to those who try to break free of the rigidity of the silo and who manage to think back to the life before. They are sent outside to clean the uppermost window while the deep downers of the silo make the slow ascent to watch the dust removed from the skyview. After just a few minutes the cleaner is dead from the poisoned dust in the air. The rest of life descends back down the silo. But rebellion is spreading alongside a growing realisation of the truth. It can no longer be contained.

I wouldn't want to tell you much about Dust because this final novel in the trilogy ends the sequence perfectly. That is the main thing to know. After the prequel of Shift, Dust returns us, enlighened, to the present and we catch up with the stories of Jules from Wool and Solo from Shift. We now know far more about Don and Troy of Silo as well as the reason for the silos and the plan of those who built them.

As with the previous two novels, Dust is extremely atmospheric with the silo world brilliantly evoked. This is a carefully stratified and utterly claustrophobic world, not only physically but also psychologically. These are great adventure stories but we also get to know people of enormous heroism and self-sacrifice. Dust also gives us the full stomach-sinking horrific magnitude of what this is all about and it is gobsmacking. The end when it comes is entirely satisfying, tying off the loose ends from the previous two novels while laying many of the stories to rest. This means it is very moving as well as exhilarating.

I have loved this series. The prose is immediate, attention-seeking and precise. The worldbuilding is second to none but so too are the characters. By this stage we are extremely fond of some characters while others are proving increasingly to be dreaded. The character development of many is wonderful and intricate. There are interludes which seem to have little impact on the end result but they all serve to make this dystopian horror more real. Above all else, the Wool trilogy is a puzzle and so this final part is essential and, I'm delighted to say, none of its pieces are missing.

I cannot recommend this sensational, original and ingenious series enough. Truly outstanding.
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on 16 July 2015
The third part of a trilogy is always the hardest, how do you wrap up the story in a nice little bow so that the reader ends feeling satisfied? Hugh Howey’s ‘Wool’ was a sublime book and this was followed up by the second, ‘Shift’, that actually moved the story into the past. Therefore, as we come to ‘Dust’ we join events just after ‘Wool’, but also have the added knowledge and characters introduces to us in ‘Shift’. For a weaker writer this would have made for a complex conclusion to the world, but Howey is anything but weak.

‘Dust’ is a great conclusion to the series, whilst never hitting the heights of ‘Wool’. We learn more about the world that Jule’s lives in, but not everything. A little mystery is a good thing, but some of the elements of the story are so opaque that I was a little confused at times. Thankfully, the universe is only one element of the book, Howey is also very adept at creating characters and action set pieces. He is an author unafraid to throw in a twist or two, events conspire in this book that will shock you at the levels of misery they create.

The world of ‘Wool’ is not a pleasant place to live in, but it is very interesting to read about. In his later ‘Sand’, Howey only underlines his ability to take a wonderful dystopian idea and run with it. Some parts of this third instalment left me muddled, but the conclusion was a good one and ‘Dust’ benefitted from being built upon the foundation of two great novels.
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