Customer Reviews


47 Reviews
5 star:
 (22)
4 star:
 (12)
3 star:
 (5)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:
 (4)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Meticulously well researched thriller with a twist
Forsyth's reputation of in depth research was more or less founded with this book. It came as a fictionalised version of, and utilising most of the research that went into The Biafra Story: The Making of an African Legend. This explains the author's uncanny knowledge of arms trading and smuggling as well as of outside financed mercenary expeditions - it would in some way...
Published on 9 Aug. 2010 by AK

› See more 5 star, 4 star reviews
versus
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The worlds longest to do list.
I am a big fan of Forsyth's work but this really is one of the worst and most misguided thrillers I have ever read. It is one long shopping list of events that range from the staggeringly dull to the only very mildly interesting. Endless chapters pass as Shannon wanders from one country to the next doing bank transfers. You could easily skip a good eighty percent of this...
Published on 5 Feb. 2013 by bajd123

› See more 3 star, 2 star, 1 star reviews

‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Meticulously well researched thriller with a twist, 9 Aug. 2010
By 
AK (London) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Dogs Of War (Paperback)
Forsyth's reputation of in depth research was more or less founded with this book. It came as a fictionalised version of, and utilising most of the research that went into The Biafra Story: The Making of an African Legend. This explains the author's uncanny knowledge of arms trading and smuggling as well as of outside financed mercenary expeditions - it would in some way be a shame not to use the knowledge in a novel afterwards. The Biafra Story: The Making of an African Legend, while excellent, was never likely to draw as wide a readership.

I agree with the other reviewers that most of the book gets dedicated to the in depth planning and organising of the operation and that the 'action' bit is relatively brief towards the end. Without revelaing too much, the ending does come with an interesting twist - again very much a result of what the author would have hoped for in the case of the original Biafra situation. For pure suspense and gripping action this book scores about average.

On the other hand it has a strong normative political message, which is an added bonus and for someone who likes their novels meticulously researched rather than off the cuff this is still a gem.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bloomin good!!, 15 Jan. 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Dogs Of War (Paperback)
It was after I had read the book that I saw that film was going to be on television and decided to stay up until stupid o'clock in the morning. If there was ever a stupid idea, and has made me wary of Christopher Walken ever since.
If unlike me, you saw the film first and have since decided that the storyline is nothing to write home about then you need to pick up the book. Right from the outset you become close to Cat Shannon, a mercenary and a leader, and his rag tag army of specialists.
Its the traditonal setup with the heavy weapons guy being 7 feet tall and the silent assassin being a small withdrawn man. But you feel for them despite their existance relying on war and as your drawn into the world of backhanders and clandestine meetings you'll soon realise that several hours have passed.
Frederick Forsyth is very good with the english language, but it's the lengths that he goes to to research the book and it is evident that he knows more about the underworld than he should.
I have read this book twice and enjoyed it thoroughly both times although I wouldn't say it was as good as "The Negotiator" or "The Devil's Alternative", both by the same author.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The worlds longest to do list., 5 Feb. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Dogs Of War (Kindle Edition)
I am a big fan of Forsyth's work but this really is one of the worst and most misguided thrillers I have ever read. It is one long shopping list of events that range from the staggeringly dull to the only very mildly interesting. Endless chapters pass as Shannon wanders from one country to the next doing bank transfers. You could easily skip a good eighty percent of this book and not even notice, read the first three to four chapters and then skip to the last few in the reasonable expectation that when a mercenary is hired to do a job he will set about preparing for that job in a normal, logical and straightforward fashion...which he does.
Joyless, dull and thoroughly uninspired.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Manual, 14 Jun. 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Dogs Of War (Paperback)
If you are looking for a manual on how best to go about a coup d'etat, as I was, this is the smart choice and that's what this book feels like, an in depth explanation of the processes involved, from the seed of greed that instigates the idea to the final execution. Reminded me of journalistic writing however, very informed but at the culmination, lacking that sense of the subjective experience.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars airline timetables and bank transfers !!, 4 Dec. 2014
This review is from: The Dogs Of War (Paperback)
I’ve meant to read this book for a long time, ever since I was shown the villa on an island off the west coast of Africa that Forsyth was living in when (supposedly) he wrote it. At first I quite enjoyed it, but started to struggle when it became apparent that the primary focus was on airline timetables and bank transfers. It almost beggars belief that there is a footnote at one point suggesting that more details of stealing an identity could be obtained from an earlier novel. I don’t think I’ve ever seen such a thing in any other fictional book that I’ve read!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent thriller, 30 Oct. 2012
By 
Mr. D. E. Calladine - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Dogs Of War (Paperback)
I bought this mainly out of curiosity, to see whether a thriller written in the mid 70s could still thrill, or whether it would have aged badly. The answer is that it still holds up, and still thrills remarkably well. As other reviewers have pointed out this is a slow burn, with most of the novel concerned with planning the mercenaries' strike, rather than the strike itself. But it rattles along very well, many of the characters really come to life, particularly Endean and Shannon, and you learn lots about the business world in the 1970s. A few bits do age - the relationship with Julie isn't all that well done - but I can't wait to read my next Frederick Forsyth. If you like modern thriller writers like Robert Harris, dig out some old thrillers like this from the 1970s and earlier from writers like Forsyth, Ira Levin and Michael Crichton.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent read from the master of the genre, 2 Sept. 2011
By 
This review is from: The Dogs Of War (Kindle Edition)
Forsyth has been a major author for 40 years now and completely changed the rules for thriller writers. The amount of research he put into his early books was immense and it shines through in the text. Everything from providing an explanation of how to get a passport issued in a false name (Day of the Jackel) to purchasing weapons through the criminal underworld (Dogs of War).

These days you can open up any Tom Clancy and find a detailed breakdown of how illegal immigrants or terrorists get across the US border (for example) but Forsyth was the first and is still the Master. It has been said that this book was used as a template for real life mercs planning a coup in Africa and once you've read it you will see why.

So far, so Boy's Own. The story is a little dated now but still very strong and plausible. If another author had written this it would be twice as long but Forsyth understands the importance of brevity. He doesn't waste any words, moves the plot along at a cracking pace and holds the reader's attenton through to the end. Some of the characters could do with a little more depth but they are strong enough to support the story. Forsyth sketches out the world of big business, plots and coups and the underworld with considerable skill and moves the reader rapidly along to the final twist in the tale.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Rather Boring!, 15 Nov. 2012
By 
Philip Elkins "Philip" (Spain) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Dogs Of War (Paperback)
I had read this book many years ago. Having now read it again, I must say that it is very well detailed and researched, but to me ultimately boring. Two thirds of the book are about planning the eventual raid, that to me is not what I would call thrilling. Much research must have gone into this book by Forsyth to begin with, but now it is of course dated, written well before the advent of mobile phones and computers. If you wish to read a book on how to plan a raid forty years ago, then this is certainly the book for you!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great read, 22 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Dogs Of War (Kindle Edition)
One of the great reads from a master story teller. Even after reading this several times over the years, the first time while on a plane flying down to Southern Africa (Rhodesia). I never felt bored by re-reading this novel but can still immerse myself in it & feel well satisfied when I have come to the end.

I would recommend this book to anyone also it is far, far better than the "Americanized" rubbish that was the film of the same name, a film that I only watched once & was most disappointed with.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars Not one of Forsyth's best, 16 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Dogs Of War (Kindle Edition)
Poor effort. 90% is planning the operation - often in very tedious detail. The characters are dreadfully cliched and one dimensional. The underlying plot is a very good one - highly redolent of the Equatorial Guinea / Mark Thatcher debacle which post-dated it by several decades (those boys should have listened to Forsyth's warning as to the risks of attempting to transport mercenaries in by air!). I'm generally a Forsyth fan - but my advice on this book is: don't bother.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Dogs Of War
The Dogs Of War by Frederick Forsyth (Paperback - 7 April 2011)
£7.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
The Day Of The Jackal
The Day Of The Jackal by Frederick Forsyth (Paperback - 7 April 2011)
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (141)   
Buy new£6.39
In stock

The Odessa File
The Odessa File by Frederick Forsyth (Paperback - 7 April 2011)
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (76)   
Buy new£6.39
In stock

The Fourth Protocol
The Fourth Protocol by Frederick Forsyth (Paperback - 7 April 2011)
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43)   
Buy new£6.39
In stock