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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent murder mystery which keeps moving at a rapid pace
This is the 2nd book from Kathy Reichs which features Temperanace (Tempe) Brennan.

Kathy Reichs is often benchmarked against Patricia Cornwell and also compared with Karin Slaughter. IMO Kathy Reichs just pips the the other two although I have enjoyed much of Slaughter's output.

Many reviews have explained Tempe's role/character which is one of a...
Published on 12 Nov 2010 by Jonathan Clark

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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Death Du Bore
Striking a balance between informing a reader and preaching to them is a difficult one. I have found in the previous Kathy Reich books that I have read that she seems to preach a little too much for my liking. In `Death Du Jour' this reaches new and book ruining heights.

Dr Temperance Brennan returns and for once is not involved in recent murder and mayhem...
Published on 24 Oct 2008 by Sam Tyler


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent murder mystery which keeps moving at a rapid pace, 12 Nov 2010
By 
Jonathan Clark "Great Black Hawk" (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is the 2nd book from Kathy Reichs which features Temperanace (Tempe) Brennan.

Kathy Reichs is often benchmarked against Patricia Cornwell and also compared with Karin Slaughter. IMO Kathy Reichs just pips the the other two although I have enjoyed much of Slaughter's output.

Many reviews have explained Tempe's role/character which is one of a forensic anthropologist.

She flits between Charlotte in South Caronlina summer and Quebec/Montreal, which makes for interesting and contrasting scenery!

Death du Jour starts off with Tempe being asked to examine the remains of Sister Elisabeth Nicolet a reveered nun who died in the late 1880's and is now proposed for sainthood.

However it is necessary to authencate her remains as her body was moved to a different place within the cemetry.

As she is in the process of doing this Tempe is asked to attend a horriffic arson attack on a house with children suspected being involved along with adults.

The events of this arson attack are described in graphic detail, so not for the squeamish.

For those who have read other Reichs novels the romance comes in the shape of Homicide Detective Andrew Ryan who is assigned to the Canadian Police.

"Death du Jour" involves multiple cases weaving from Montreal to North Carolina and takes you into the twilight world of satanic cults.

My only criticism is that Reichs uses too many different strands within this plot, some of which impact on its overall credibilty.

For example her sister Harry gets involved and mysterioulsy goes missing and her Daughter (Katy) also muscles in on the scene.

Ultimately all the disparate elements come together in an interesting way which is managed extremely cleverly by KR.

What makes Reich's books interesting is that she is a forensic anthropologist and draws on her own experence which makes it all the more vivid and at times, spine tingling.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Death Du Bore, 24 Oct 2008
By 
Striking a balance between informing a reader and preaching to them is a difficult one. I have found in the previous Kathy Reich books that I have read that she seems to preach a little too much for my liking. In `Death Du Jour' this reaches new and book ruining heights.

Dr Temperance Brennan returns and for once is not involved in recent murder and mayhem. Instead she has been asked by a group of Nuns to look in the ruins of a church for one of their long dead sisters who is to be potentially canonised. However, as usual trouble follows Temperance and when a local house goes up in flames she is asked to identify the bodies. It seems that several people have died and that it was arson. If these two cases were not enough Brenan becomes involved in a third when two corpses are found on a wildlife sanctuary. Can Brenan juggle all three cases and her personal life which appears to be under threat by a mysterious stranger?

I found `Death Du Jour' a stagnant novel. Firstly, this was due to the fact that there were too many ongoing cases and it became confusing. The worst problem is the patronising tone that Reichs takes when describing things. One minute Dr Brennan is an expert giving in-depth details, the next she is apparently a novice and asking for them. It is too obvious that Reichs is trying to force feed the reader in-depth analysis, it all felt a little hollow to me and far too over analytical. Reichs is probably one of the pioneers of the detailed modern crime novel and as this was an early book in the series perhaps she has refined her skills. As it is this book felt very dated in its style as other authors have gone on to copy her style and improve on it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars disappointing to say the least, very déjà vu, 19 Oct 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Death du Jour (Hardcover)
Having read Déjà Dead and not really got on with it, I decided to give Ms Reich a second chance. Death du Jour just does not gel. It is rather like sitting through an anatomy lecture where one's eyes glaze over. Unlike Patricia Cornwell, who can whip us through the autopsy along side her, hanging on to her every word and description.
The characters do not come over as real. I cannot relate to either Tempe's colleagues, or her daughter and only now is Tempe Brennan taking shape as a character. Not exciting in the least as a forensic anthropologist.
Had this been condensed into 250 pages instead of 379, then may be she could have concentrated on her main theme. There are too many cases arriving on the scene for her to deal with thatmakes this "bitty" and I am getting lost and bored along the way.
For those who do not speak or read French, there are too many French phrases added unnecessarily, which always annoys me and, then, on top of that, the Québecois "patois" appears (as in her first novel).
When she takes us through a city, there is too much detail. Supply a map as annex, if she feels we need all this.
I really expected more from her second book, as I assume there would have been sufficient reviews pointing out the shortfalls of the first one. Instead it leaves a lot to be desired. Too many metaphors, as well.
I do not think I shall finish the book without skipping numerous pages.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars too many coincidences make for a sub par read, 4 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Death Du Jour (Hardcover)
I really enjoyed Deja Dead, Kathy Reich's first novel, and thought it was better than anything Patricia Cornwell had done in a while. But in this book, the plotting is just lazy. Brennan finds bodies related to her case while on an outing, the cases just happen to have ties near each of her homes-- Montreal and Charlotte, NC, someone from one case asks her help in finding someone and THEY also are part of her other case... and I thought it was bad when in the Robert Tannenbaum books, Butch and Marlene's cases are tied together coincidentally! At least they are only dealing with Manhattan, not half the Northern Hemisphere! This is like the Hardy Boys finding out they are really working on their dad's case, but at least Bayport is a small town.
Especially irritating is the way information is withheld from the reader, while every chapter ends with Brennan's jaw dropping, her shivering in horror, or giving us foreboding that something bad is about to happen. Really? I think we expect that in a THRILLER!
Also, the parallels with Cornwell are too much to ignore. Scarpetta's niece is an FBI trainee, Brennan's daughter wants to be a profiler (just how many of those ARE there, anyway?). Both have hot and cold relationships with cops. Maybe this was rushed because of the debut's success.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Sorry, Not even close to a Deja Dead., 6 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Death Du Jour (Hardcover)
I really enjoyed Deja Dead. Death Du Jour however seemed to be forced, frenetic, and padded. I felt there were a hundred pages in the middle that were rather experimental in style. Does the author gain some personal redemption discussing for a page why she did not spend the evening with her x-husband. Do we need all of the cliched discussion of the south and draped Spanish moss ending in probably one of the worst sentences to be published this year: "The tide of time itself ebbs tardily to the eternal sea"? (p. 170). This is not the dialog of a forensic anthropologist.
Hey, I am not a professional critic. I have never read Patricia Cornwell. I eagerly await another tale of forensic sleuthing from Kathy Reichs who I'm sure has a great story to tell. Now just tell it!
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2.0 out of 5 stars It's Always Something with Tempe's Digs, 9 Aug 2014
By 
Stephanie De Pue (Wilmington, NC USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Death Du Jour: (Temperance Brennan 2) (Paperback)
DEATH DU JOUR is the second of Kathy Reichs' monster bestselling Temperance Brennan forensic mystery series, on which the popular television series BONES is based. It follows on DEJA DEAD, which was Kathy Reichs' first Brennan forensic detective novel, which was pretty much an overnight, star-making sensation. Reichs was immediately seen as a fresher, possibly better-grounded forensics writer than Patricia Cornwell, who was, perhaps, getting a bit stale. For which overnight success, as it happens, Reichs was well-prepared: a Chicago girl who is extremely well-qualified and -backgrounded to be writing such stories. She holds a Ph.D. from Northwestern University. Like her fictional creation, Temperance Brennan, Reichs is forensic anthropologist for the province of Quebec. She is a former Vice President of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, serves on the Canadian National Police Services Advisory Council, and is one of only fifty-six forensic anthropologists certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology. A professor of anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Reichs didn't reach too far, of course, in creating Temperance, a woman who, like her creator, is a Chicago girl who lives and works in Quebec and North Carolina. But then she's proven she didn't need to.

In fact, Temperance has proven herself an all-around smart creation, an honest, empathetic,insightful, hard-working woman, with a cat, and a life, to call her own. She also gets to commute between two interesting places. Montreal can surely be cold, but it's got French food and fashion; North Carolina can surely be warm, but it's got that fresh seafood and those beachy-keen Outer Banks(on one of which I happened to be vacationing when I began reading her, and on another of which, lucky me, I now live).

This is a well-written, taut, novel, delivered with humor and wit, and heavily seasoned with Reichs' experience and knowledge. I once saw Reichs speak, live, at the Wilmington, North Carolina’s library’s Mystery Book Fair. She appeared to be a witty, intelligent lively and humorous woman. She does use various North Carolina settings in her work, including, pleasingly enough for me, Wilmington and its beaches. I have read and reviewed, in these pages, the author’s 206 BONES, BONES NEVER LIE, BREAK NO BONES, CROSS BONES, DEADLY DECISIONS, DEJA DEAD, FATAL VOYAGE and GRAVE SECRETS.

So, DEATH DU JOUR, like most of Reichs’ other work, is set in both Montreal and North Carolina. What could be handier? The book opens with Tempe digging up a frozen old church near Quebec, looking for the bones of an obscure nun to whom the Church is considering granting sainthood. The bones are not where they should be. Regular readers may have noticed, it's always something with Tempe's digs. Either there are bones where they shouldn't be; or none where they should be. Or bones that are too new in an old burial site, or bones that are too old in a new burial or disaster site. At any rate, Tempe does find the bones, and, in a feat of forensics that I found fascinating, succeeds in establishing the identity of the nun's bones, and explaining the considerable mystery that still clings to them.

There's also a subplot involving arson, and another involving the sudden disappearance of a student from Montreal's well-known Mc Gill University. The latter somehow brings Tempe to the warm, welcoming beaches of North Carolina's Outer Banks, and even to a hotel at which I stayed several times. Fantastique!! But here I get unhappy. In this book's denouement, Reichs, as Cornwell has done at least once, simply points to the mysterious cult and says: they did it. Authors, please understand: such an ending may reflect real life. But readers of mysteries do not invest the time and the money to buy and read books in order to be told: they did it. For our investment, we expect an actual murderer to be named. One of the weaker of the series.
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5.0 out of 5 stars If you like Cornwell , you will like this book, 12 April 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Death Du Jour (Hardcover)
In a church graveyard, Montreal forensic anthropologist Dr. Temperance Brennan diligently digs up the remains of a nun who died in 1888. The church plans to bestow sainthood on Sister Elisabeth Nicolet. However, the marked site fails to contain the sister''s bones as for some mysterious reason they were moved to another locale. When she finds the remains, Tempe begins to feel that the good nun succumbed to foul play.

At the same time, modern deaths due to arson and a teaching assistant disappearance have Tempe overworked. Still, the Tarheel native plows ahead to solve the century old mystery of Sister Elisabeth while helping with the current case load even as it draws her back to Beaufort, North Carolina.

DEATH DU JOUR, the second Tempe tale, is as terrific as the award winning debut novel (see DEJA DEAD). Tempe remains a serene, warm (in spite of her always being cold) character and the support cast adds Canadian and Carolinian depths to the crisp story line. The subplots cleverly merge together, but it is Kathy Reich's' ability to describe in depth forensic tools and results (autopsies, etc.) without goring the reader with plot drifting that makes this work a winner. Instead, these graphic passages augment the entertaining tale with a ring of authenticity. Sub-genre fans will demand more Tempe tales.

Harriet Klausner
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4.0 out of 5 stars Even better than Deja Dead, 2 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Death du Jour (Hardcover)
Well, it wasn't a one-off. In fact, Death du Jour is better written, and probably more original, than Deja Dead. What's interesting here is the confident and assured way Reichs handles several different stories at once - the exhumation of a nun, the forensic evidence that could entrap an arsonist, the human story about her sister, Harriet. The latter is particularly good, making the gruesome forensic detail seem all the more gruesome for being presented as a complete contrast to Brennan's mundane private life.
Inevitably, Reichs gets compared to Cornwell, but Brennan is a less angry and more domesticated character than Scarpetta. In truth, Cornwell still probably has the edge - buy Point of Origin to see her writing at her best - but that may partly because we've got to know Scarpetta over the course of so many books: in four or five episodes time, Brennan may be just as rich and real a character. Fans of well-written forensic fiction should also check out The Death Pit by Tony Strong, a brilliant and eerie forensic thriller set in the Scottish Highlands. The genre seems to be thriving at the moment: plenty of life in them old dead bones yet!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A MUST READ!!!!!, 31 Oct 2002
By 
After reading Deja Dead I just had to read Death Du Jour. When i read the first chapter I could't really get my head around the whole nun and saint story line - but what a way to introduce a novel that ultimately had religion surging through its veins the whole way through...I couldn't put the thing down.
Having read all of the Patricia Cornwell (Kay Scarpetta) books I've now found someone that writes along the same lines and definitely in the same class; something i didn't think would ever happen.
All I can say is congratulations to Kathy Reichs, already I can picture Tempe as she goes about her work and my enjoyment of reading more about her will only grow with the more books I read.
Highly recommended
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Great start, poor ending, 21 Sep 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Death du Jour (Hardcover)
Having read Deja Dead I was expecting a strong, if not stronger follow up. For the first three-quarters of the novel that was what I got. But something went badly wrong in the final scenes.
It seems to me that Ms Reichs lost her way towards the end; two characters talking through all the loose ends" routine to resolve all of the outstanding plot lines. It is simply not credible that two characters would, following a traumatic event, sit down together some days or weeks later and discuss things as though coming to them for the first time. In simple terms, she was "telling me" rather than "showing me".
To have such a good book spoilt by the terrible ending disappointed me greatly.
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Death Du Jour: (Temperance Brennan 2)
Death Du Jour: (Temperance Brennan 2) by Kathy Reichs (Paperback - 7 July 2011)
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