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5.0 out of 5 stars Zeppelin Nights: London in the First World War
I’ve read another book by this author on London in the Eighteenth Century. This book follows a similar format, telling the life of London and its people during a particular period, in this case from 1914 through to 1918, the time of the First World War. It’s fascinating to learn how Londoners coped first with the shock of the news of the War, and then how...
Published 1 month ago by Keen Reader

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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ... for tis compelling subject though from an historical survey good contextual
Not gripping enough for tis compelling subject though from an historical survey good contextual materials
Published 28 days ago by P. A. Delaney


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5.0 out of 5 stars Zeppelin Nights: London in the First World War, 12 July 2014
By 
Keen Reader "lhendry4" (Auckland, New Zealand) - See all my reviews
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I’ve read another book by this author on London in the Eighteenth Century. This book follows a similar format, telling the life of London and its people during a particular period, in this case from 1914 through to 1918, the time of the First World War. It’s fascinating to learn how Londoners coped first with the shock of the news of the War, and then how people reacted to the War itself. There is much to learn for the reader from a book like this; I didn’t know, for example, how troops from the Western Front were shipped back to London for hospital treatment and were picked up to be taken to hospital in cars donated by wealthy patrons. Interestingly the logistics of shipping men back and forth was something that had to be thought of as though for the first time – something we take very much for granted in this modern world of ours one hundred years on.

The book moves chronologically, but also through chapters that are broken down in general ways into subjects or themes – for instance, the idea of women in the workforce, of banning “indecent” entertainments for the duration, of the breakdown or interruption to services to homeowners and businesses, food shortages, coping with the harrowing effect of zeppelin raids or threats of invasion, managing without the menfolk at home; so many things that had to be dealt with on a daily basis that are hard to imagine from our distance now.

As with the author’s other books, this is a lively mixture of fact and anecdote; interesting, enlightening and entertaining all at once. It is a book I felt best read in chunks – one chapter at a time, and a bit of time to digest the dense amount of information in each chapter before moving on to the next. Wonderful, and highly recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent account of social conditions in London during the First World War., 13 Aug 2014
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Excellent book. From the title I had expected a book about warfare and London bombing, but it was far wider than that. It is an excellent account of what life was like in London before and during the First World War, from the entertainments, to the rise of the munitions industry with it's Canary Girls. There are the prostitutes and good time girls alongside the newly formed Women's Police Service who sought to control them. Class is a big issue with the upper classes feeling less of the shortages than the poorer classes did. And of course the persecution of all aliens living in London city. It is a microcosm of life during wartime, and although it only considers London, it reflects what life must have been like throughout Britain. I would heartily recommend this book if you are interested in life on the Home front during the First World War
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Foretaste of the Second World War Strategic Bombing Offensive., 4 May 2014
By 
Dr Barry Clayton (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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In 1921 the Italian General Douhet wrote his 'Command of the Air',a classic account of air power theory, and about the need to build a strategic bomber force arguing it would enable wars to be fought without the need to fight land wars like that of 1914-18. He argued the areoplane had altered warfare irrevocably. By the 1930's Baldwin was warning the bomber would always get through. The Great War saw the first demonstration of war from the air. The experience influenced Douhet and Baldwin greatly. Also influential was H.G.Wells whose The War in the Air was published in 1908. Numerous other books discussed terror bombing. Like Wells these authors were mainly influenced by the growing influence of science on warfare. In 1913 Wells had even anticipated nuclear war.

What few appreciated in 1914 was that the ability to wage war from the air meant civilians no longer enjoyed immunity. It was to prove to be a momentous development in the history of warfare.

Italy was the first state to conduct air war by bombing. In 1911 she bombed targets in Libya. The bombing sometimes took the form of a dropped hand grenade.
The controversial strategic bombing offensive of the Second World War was an inevitable outcome, based as it was initially on winning the war from the air, thereby avoiding horrendous casualties resulting from land operations.

This most interesting book by Professor Jerry White of London University tells the story of Zeppelin, Gotha and Giant air raids on London in the Great War. The first of 52 raids beginning on the night of 20-21 January 1915. The object of these raids was to destroy the morale of the British people.

The book is a welcome relief from the numerous accounts of the land war currently pouring out like a torrent. The author is known as a first class historian of London over the past 200 years. He writes with clarity, and his research is excellent.

One of the highlights of this account unlike many others about the air war on London is how the author sets the bombing raids within the context of daily life in the capital. As a result we learn a great deal about the social life of Londoners (whose population was 7.5 million, twice the size of Greater Berlin), and how it was affected by the air raids. He has captured the daily experience of the mass of Londoners. Therefore, this is more of a social history of the times than a history of the bombing of London. As a result, this is not for those that want a detailed history of the air war. This is available elsewhere.

Many in government and the church condemned the German bombing as cowardly, as they did the use of submarines, apparently oblivious to the fact we dropped over 8000 tons of bombs on Germany during the war. The TIMES described bombing as 'barbarism', a term that became popular 25 years later in certain quarters. Trenchard, on the other hand, said the moral effect of bombing was 20 times more than the material effect, though the evidence was lacking to support this.

In the war 1450 civilians were, according to this book, killed by air raids (a figure disputed by other sources that say it was 1,239). This compares with 40000 who died in WW11. The raids caused deep anxiety and fear being a new form of warfare against which there was little effective defence although anti-aircraft guns were in place across south-east England by April 1915, and some 250 were emplaced to defend London by 1918. One outcome was air raid precaution planning whose lessons were used in the 1930's. It has been estimated that in London between 100,000 and 300,000 sought shelter in the Underground.

The author describes, few others have done this, the Giant bomber (or R.V1). It was a monster with a wing span of 138 feet, bigger than any bomber that bombed London in the 1939-45 war, even longer than the wingspan of the much later Lancaster bomber. It carried a bomb load of two tons. Not one was shot down. Like the Gotha and Zeppelin its maximum speed with a full load was under 90 mph. The maximum altitude of the Gotha was 21,300 feet. Accuracy was extremely poor as indeed it was throughout the Second World War. Bombers were in Raleigh's phrase 'cold meat' for fighters.

White describes how Londoners despite the war improved their lot. For example, wages rose, and family incomes increased thanks to women working. He also tells us of clergymen, one of whom recovered the prayer books in khaki and 'used the crypt as a rifle range'. More stories concern the view of some that morals were in decline because of women drinking in pubs.
Of particular interest is the fact that not everyone viewed the war as terrible. Some we are told even found it 'wonderful'.

For his research the author used most of the well known sources as well as council minutes, diaries and files of the Church of England Society for Waifs and Strays.

Recommended. A very good addition to existing accounts of the birth of war from the air.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 16 Jun 2014
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This provides an excellent, comprehensive and coherent narrative account of London during the First World War. Up to a few years ago it was so difficult to find material about the home front 1914-18 that you had mainly to rely on Sylvia Pankhurst’s book, which is of course an important primary source but not really acceptable as a balanced overview. I hadn’t expected Zeppelin Nights to be solely about the zeppelin campaign, but surprisingly I felt that in some places its coverage of specific particularly serious air raids was more informative than I could find in some of the works around that focus on the aerial warfare aspect. This is going into my permanent collection for future reference.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Compelling history of a capital in the Front Line for the first time, 11 Jun 2014
By 
James Hayes "JM Hayes" (Herts., UK) - See all my reviews
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Engrossing history of how the capital fared during the 1914-1918 conflict. London wasn't the only place on the UK mainland that was raided by German airships and bomber aircraft during the First World War, but it was obviously a prestige target for the enemy, and its population density meant that the psychological impact of bombs being dropped on British mainland for the first time - with the British authorities seemingly powerless to stop them, at first - was intensified. When airships first appeared in the skies over London - picked out by searchlights - people used to stand out in the streets and watch, and were more likely to be killed or injured by falling shrapnel from their anti-aircraft guns than from enemy bombs. When the casualities from bombing started to rack-up - and unrestricted submarine warfare resulting in the sinking of the liner RMS Lusitania in May 1915, leaving 1,198 passengers and crew dead - German and other foreign nationals, many of who had been domiciled in London for years before the outbreak of hostilities, where cruelly targeted for reprisals by angry local populaces, driven from their homes and businesses, and often interned. Jerry White gives an insightful, fact-driven account, compellingly written; much of his evidence is based on contemporary testimony from diaries written at the time. This book is highly recommended.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Insight into the Home Front, 11 Aug 2014
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An excellent, well-researched read which satisfied a lot of my curiosity about what was happening at home during WW1. I have only deducted one star because of a curious proof-reading defect in the Kindle edition, whereby a lot of terms have been (unintentionally?) hyphenised.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating read, 9 Aug 2014
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J. M. Allen (Sussex UK) - See all my reviews
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Extremely well written and informative acount of life in London during WW1.Highly recommended as essential reading for anyone interested in the home front during this period
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A lot of new insights to the war, 22 May 2014
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This really was a most interesting read. A huge amount of information and interpretation about the conditions in London during the war. A good read for most of us who tend to think WW1 primarily affected those fighting overseas.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars REAL HISTORY, 26 May 2014
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I WOULD FULLY RECOMMEND THIS BOOK AS IT TELLS YOU ABOUT HOW IT WAS IN THE LAST WAR AND HOW PEOPLE LIVED THEIR DAILY LIVES REALLY INTERESTING
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So much change in the blinking of an eye, almost., 9 July 2014
By 
R. K. Hunter (Bournemouth,England) - See all my reviews
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London is not just a place, not just its people,not just its infer-structure.
In his previous three books on London Jerry White showed us all that and more besides. For this his forth book he has shown us some of the Sorrow's, upheavals and turmoil of Londoners and their reactions to life during World War One.
The war challenged and hit hard the cosiness of the Edwardian sunshine life style. And it brought most Londoners crying and hurt into the twenty-th century, with damages that would not be healed before another war was upon London.If you had gone into a coma in 1914 as it started and awoke as peace was signed you would of seen great change and would have been greatly shocked.
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Zeppelin Nights: London in the First World War
Zeppelin Nights: London in the First World War by Jerry White (Paperback - 5 Feb 2015)
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