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44 of 46 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Debut
I confess to deliberately avoiding Karin Slaughter and made the mistake of assuming she was another Patricia Cornwell/Kathy Reichs. How wrong I was!!!

This is a great debut novel with a much harder/gruesome edge to it than I was expecting. The writing style is very lucid and I found the characters intriguing. The perpetrator was also not obvious although subtle...
Published on 18 Mar. 2007 by J. Mellor

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Relies too much on gore for its shock-value rather than good story-telling
Sara Linton, paediatrician and medical examiner of a sleepy Georgia town, goes to the bathroom in her local diner and is precipitated into horror when she finds a violated and dying woman in there. But she is just the first victim and the small town becomes the site of a violent sexual killer. Interspersed with the serial killer story is that of Sara's own relationship...
Published on 19 Jun. 2010 by Roman Clodia


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44 of 46 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Debut, 18 Mar. 2007
By 
J. Mellor "stayleyvegas" (Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I confess to deliberately avoiding Karin Slaughter and made the mistake of assuming she was another Patricia Cornwell/Kathy Reichs. How wrong I was!!!

This is a great debut novel with a much harder/gruesome edge to it than I was expecting. The writing style is very lucid and I found the characters intriguing. The perpetrator was also not obvious although subtle clues were there all along.

It is a good storyline with an element of realism about it, given the very gory descriptions, which draw you in.

I would certainly recommend this book.

The good thing about it is there are quite a few other Slaughter books that I can now buy with confidence!!!!!!!!
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Debut, 14 July 2006
By 
O E J - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Blindsighted is the first of five novels (so far) set in Grant County, Georgia and involving paediatrician and medical examiner Sara Linton, ex-husband and local police chief Jeffrey Tolliver, and his rookie assistant Detective Lena Adams. In this highly promising debut from Karin Slaughter, we are presented with a vicious and sickly murder of a young blind woman and its resulting investigation, followed up with further homicides, which together take us into the minds if not souls of the leading characters and in so doing often delve deeply into their very troubled pasts.

Having only read one Slaughter novel before this one (Faithless, the fifth in the series) and liking it, I was looking forward to finding out how this series started out, particularly given that most reviewers suggest that this debut is the best of the five. In the end I would say that it is probably marginally better than Faithless but to be honest it's really a case of 'more of the same'. Again I found the most interesting character to be Lena Adams because of the three she clearly has the most coiled-up energy and for me the most interesting secrets. Sara Linton, it emerges, has plenty to hide herself, in a kind of past life, but she has contained it rather better and her personality comes over as being slightly bland. Amid the highly-detailed descriptions of the gore and post-mortems, there is comprehensive character examination which probably provides the strongest backbone to this tale, with all of the skeletons in each of their emotional wardrobes described and developed with sensitivity and realism.

I don't think it really breaks any new ground in particular, at least not in the dramatic sense, but for anyone who likes murder mysteries with blood spattered across most of the pages, and an authentic degree of characterisation analysis, then this tale is unlikely to disappoint.
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38 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Superb, 25 Jun. 2003
Its hard to write a review on this book that does it justice.
I made the mistake of reading Kisscut first and so I knew the basics of what had happened in this book. I have to say, however, that it didn't really spoil it that much.
If your into crime thrillers or are just exploring the genre then this is a great book to start with providing your not to squeamish.
For a first novel this firmly puts Karin Slaughter on the map. She builds her characters well and you take this with you to Kisscut. YOu find yourself entrapped in this novel that though gruesome and scary you just have to read on.
Sara Linton is a great character. I have read some reviews about the inaccuracy of the postmortems but come on what average reader is that worried about that as long as they are close enough and make you understand. We don't want to be blinded by scientific terminology.
My recommendation is read this book. You will read it quickly and it will leave you wanting more....I've just pre ordered her new one....what does that tell you?
Enjoy
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Debut Book, 23 Oct. 2006
By 
A. Rose (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
I'd read of good reviews of this new crime/thriller writer and thought I'd give her first book a go and I wasn't disappointed. An excellent debut book and I'm sure the following books will be just as good if not better. The story was murderously gripping from the start and the puzzle of the murder made you want to quickly continue through the book. It was very graphic in the description of the murders and the following autopsies which makes excellent reading - loads of blood and gore! The only down side that irritated me slightly was that nearly all the characters seemed to be very bad tempered, angry people that flared up for little or no apparent reason.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Relies too much on gore for its shock-value rather than good story-telling, 19 Jun. 2010
By 
Roman Clodia (London) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Sara Linton, paediatrician and medical examiner of a sleepy Georgia town, goes to the bathroom in her local diner and is precipitated into horror when she finds a violated and dying woman in there. But she is just the first victim and the small town becomes the site of a violent sexual killer. Interspersed with the serial killer story is that of Sara's own relationship with her ex-husband, the police chief Jeffrey Tolliver, and dark secrets in her past.

This is the first Karin Slaughter book I have read and, while I didn't hate it, I did find it both very conventional and told in a clunky fashion. There's very little excitement in the pace of the writing which is uniformly adequate but dull, with lots of flashback, lets-catch-up-on-past-history slowing it all down. The characters have been seen before: the ball-busting women with no time for men... but with hidden vulnerabilities, and the tangled personal life of the two investigators.

The plot itself doesn't make an awful lot of sense: I don't want to include spoilers but new readers might want to look away here - there is a huge and unlikely coincidence that the same woman should be targeted by two violent rapists on the same day. And why does one wait twelve years before completing his plan?
This is a gory book with more than a hint of torture-porn about it but beneath that is a rather pedestrian story not particularly well-worked out or written. I certainly didn't hate it but am equally not rushing out to read the rest of Slaughter's books.

Ps. What is her strange obsession with the characters from Wuthering Heights? Cathy Linton, Hareton (Hare) Earnshaw?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The crimes of a psychopath, without the believability?, 31 Aug. 2013
I like to read debut novels, get hooked on the characters, and then buy the whole series, but I am sure if I will not meet the protagonists portrayed in this novel again.

The novel started falteringly - Ms Slaughter didn't grab me as she recounted the day-to-day goings on of Dr Sara Linton in her work in the sleepy town on Heartsdale, Georgia, but by the end of the first chapter I was hooked - or rather, shocked and repulsed. Either way, I was still hooked.

However, by the end of the novel my feelings had completely reversed. The characters felt cliched - a tough, but ultimately vulnerable female pathologist with a secret, who is recently divorced from her husband - the masculine chief of police. I was left with questions about the motives of the killer, despite the fact I had picked him out a mile off from the myriad of potential murderers sent to throw me off the scent. The violence was gratuitous, but without any sense of psychopathy to lend it credibility.

In summary, it's an OK story which brings together the plot threads with a hammer, rather than weaving them together subtly. The weak/cliched characters, let me down. The novel portrays the crimes of a psychopath, without the believability. It's entertaining, but dissatisfying.

And the whole book made me want to reach for the red pen to cut 10% out of it - could have been tighter editorially to give it a stronger voice.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This book is not really about crime., 22 May 2010
By 
A. P. J. Jansen (Netherlands) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
If you like crime novels, like me, because, amongst other things, the crime in a book forms a hard-to-solve puzzle, then this book is not for you. The book is really about a group of people that all have a traumatic experience in their past that seems to dominate their lives. Unfortunately, this does not lead to interesting characters. On the contrary, because they are determined by a single event, the characters are rather flat. The crimes in the book, though very gruesome and described quite vividly, seem almost peripheral. They are also not really solved. In fact, the police doesn't even do much to solve the crimes, because they are much too busy with other things like making sure the racist don't kill innocent people, improving their personal relations, and checking on the wrong suspects. The perpetrator is finally stopped because one of his intended victims manages to kill him. All in all not a very exciting book.
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fab!, 17 Feb. 2003
What a great book.
I have just got back from a weeks holiday where i read 'Blindsighted' and 'Kisscut' straight after each other.
'Blindsighted' is a fantastically written thriller, although, as already stated by a previous reader, can be a bit too graphic at times. It plots the story of Sara Linton (peadiatrician and medical examiner) and her ex husband Jeffrey Tolliver (chief of police) as they try to unravel the mysteries surrounding two horrific deaths.
Unlike other reviewers, i did not figure out who had done it until it was unraveled in the book. I thought it was kept well hidden and i hadn't guessed.
Karen Slaughter is proving with this novel that she is hot on the heels of the likes of Patricia Cornwell and Kathy Reichs, although i don't think they need to worry just yet!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Impressive Debut, 14 Feb. 2003
This review is from: Blindsighted (Paperback)
As indicated this is a first novel for this author - with the second 'Kisscut' also just released.
I was impressed with the engaging and easy style with which she writes - it is a gripping story, which holds your interest well. There are believable characters (including the victims) with whom one becomes involved very quickly and with no real effort.
The story is satisfyingly grisly in keeping with modern standards, and I feel this book would appeal to people who enjoy: Val McDermid, Patricia Cornwell, Kathy Reichs, Boris Starling etc.
I look forward to reading the second instalment in this author's promising career.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A thrilling and thought-provoking read for the strong of stomach, 29 Sept. 2012
By 
This review is from: Blindsighted: (Grant County series 1) (Paperback)
I accidentally read one of the later books in this series, Skin Privilege, back in April, and really enjoyed it, so I decided it was time to start at the beginning and catch up on the characters' back stories... This novel introduces Sara Linton, Grant County paediatrician and coroner, as well as the other two key players in the series: her ex-husband, Chief of Police Jeffrey Tolliver, and his feisty young detective Lena Adams. Where 'Skin Privilege' focussed on drug running and authority corruption, 'Blindsighted' highlights sexual violence, manipulation, and what happens to individuals, couples and families in the aftermath of rape.

It opens with Sara finding Sibyl Adams, Lena's blind twin sister, raped, drugged and mutilated, in the bathroom of the local diner. Despite her best efforts, Sibyl dies in her arms. A familiar and well-loved face around town, her death throws the locals into turmoil, raising old demons, causing huge professional and personal conflict for Lena, and pushing Sara and Jeff together as they struggle to find a lead that might help them track down the killer. When the mysterious predator strikes again, drugging and crucifying a young student, the race is on to stop him before he can strike a third time. As a reader, as a woman - as a human being - this is brutal, thought-provoking and disturbing material, but once again I found that once I was wrapped up in Slaughter's claustrophobic small-town web, it was very hard to wrench myself free.

Although Slaughter doesn't hold back with the grisly description and clinical details of the crimes in her novels, I think their strength really lies in her characters. They are not secondary to the violence being committed, nor are they shallow vessels for justice. Changing the third-person viewpoint every so often allows the reader an insight into each of the main characters and their motives, and the author explores their personal journeys and complicated relationships with such warmth that we can't help but invest in their wellbeing and success. Her female characters are particularly well-drawn; Sara is a strong woman who has overcome a tragic past to stand tall at Jeffrey's side through everything the novel throws at her, and Lena is certainly a tough cookie, but in a more headstrong and stubborn way. Jeffrey is almost the weakest of the three, in a sense, despite his role at the head of the investigation!

Overall, despite the odd couple of slow moments (where Slaughter became a bit too character-centric and seemed to forget about all the urgent and exciting things she'd set into motion that I wanted to get back to!), this was another well-plotted, emotive and gripping read that I ended up liking more than 'Skin Privilege'. Gruesome truths are revealed with expert timing for maximum visceral impact, the autopsy scenes are painstakingly authentic, the relationships between characters are sympathetic and very astutely observed, and I learned some fascinating details about belladonna (the killer's drug of choice) as well. If I can learn something interesting while I'm being entertained then so much the better! Recommended for crime/thriller fans with a strong(ish) stomach and a keen interest in the bizarre and bleak world that is the criminal mind...
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Blindsighted: (Grant County series 1)
Blindsighted: (Grant County series 1) by Karin Slaughter (Paperback - 23 Jun. 2011)
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