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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wise, humble, beautiful
I read this book while on holiday and had a bit of trouble to begin with it... It is one of those books that is so well written and has so many insights that you really have to be paying attention whist reading (hard when travelling).

The book only really starts in earnest around about a third of the way in, so you have to be a little patient to get to the crux...
Published on 1 Aug 2010 by aus_books

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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars To Kill a Mockingbird
To see the world through the eyes of an eight-year old is fascinating, unusual, moving and enlightening. What Lee has done is produce a piece of social commentary free from adult interpreations and prejudices. The world of old-time southern America is described to us with the unspoiled logic of a child, and the tone of the book is pitch-perfect and true throughout...
Published on 15 Aug 2010 by Book 1981


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wise, humble, beautiful, 1 Aug 2010
By 
This review is from: To Kill A Mockingbird: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
I read this book while on holiday and had a bit of trouble to begin with it... It is one of those books that is so well written and has so many insights that you really have to be paying attention whist reading (hard when travelling).

The book only really starts in earnest around about a third of the way in, so you have to be a little patient to get to the crux of the matter (admittedly I don't read blurbs so didn't know what direction the book was going to take).

However, once underway, this book is a pearl of wisdom and humanity. The story of Scout and her family is simply stunning in its scope. By adopting to tell the story from a child's point-of-view, Lee has been able to deal with profound topics about humanity and injustice in a way that is accessible, funny and highly engaging.

The standout areas for me revolved around Atticus' explanations and empathy for others. I'm trying to adjust some of my thinking in my life based on what I've read in this book. Thoughts, like the fact we can and should try to put ourselves in others peoples shoes are so well explained.

For me, this book could be thought studied as a form of philosophy; the core principles revolving around empathy and pacifism. In today's world of terrorism and Pre-emptive Wars I wish more politicians (who've probably read this book) would go back to it adopt Harper Lee's doctrine.

I am not usually one to re-read books (after all, I'll never get through all the books I still want to read in this lifetime) but I suspect that this book will become one exception. There are so many treasures, insights and nuggets of wisdom that I didn't quite capture in my first read. Highly, highly recommended.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring, a must-read!, 7 Sep 2010
By 
Gl Thomas - See all my reviews
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This review is from: To Kill A Mockingbird: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
Most people were forced to read this book at school. I am fortunate that I was not! I think this would have taken away some of the pleasure I had in reading it. I was enthralled, could not put it down and, as a result, read it in a few days - in bed, at work, etc! I was totally gutted when I finished it as I felt like I knew the characters and actually MISS them, especially Atticus. I'm dying to know what happened next! I would urge anyone to read it, it's definitely changed my life.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars To Kill a Mockingbird, 15 Aug 2010
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This review is from: To Kill A Mockingbird: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
To see the world through the eyes of an eight-year old is fascinating, unusual, moving and enlightening. What Lee has done is produce a piece of social commentary free from adult interpreations and prejudices. The world of old-time southern America is described to us with the unspoiled logic of a child, and the tone of the book is pitch-perfect and true throughout.

Though the trial of Tom Robinson is meant to be the centerpiece, I felt a lot more emotionally involved in the people in Scout's immediate life. Jem, Dill, Aunt Alexandra, and of course, Atticus all interact with Scout in a lovely, natural way which is sometimes really sad and vulnerable and other times funny and uplifting. No doubt this book is skilfully written and immensly readable, but other books have moved me more, which I have to say came as a surprise to me. I was expecting to be blown away, and am rather disappointed that I wasn't.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best novel of all time., 3 Nov 2014
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This review is from: To Kill A Mockingbird: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
I read Harper Lee's classic twenty years ago and loved everything about it. Her story of life in a small town in the Deep South, mixed with an incredible but easy going style of writing, produced one of the best loved books of all time. I passed my original copy to my niece who promised to read it. So far she hasn't picked it up, but I'm not going to push her. Sooner or later she'll discover it for herself. Meanwhile I bought a new copy and immersed myself in the life of Scout and the Finch family. It's hard to stop praising a book which in reality, shows a community with all its prejudices laid bare for the reader. I don' t think there are many communities, even nowadays, that would stand up to too much scrutiny. But there are many positive ideals and hopes to take from these pages. One of them being that life isn't always fair or just, but given time and by example, change can happen.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars bargain!!! buy it!!!, 12 July 2010
By 
shell (north-east england) - See all my reviews
This review is from: To Kill A Mockingbird: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
first can i start with...i cant believe how cheap this edition is?!
i bought my copy a while ago but i'm going to get my nieces a copy because its sooo cheap and also i'm steering them towards quality classic books and trying to drag them away from badly written vampirish books.

my nieces stay with me every summer and we start a new book each year, last summer it was 101 dalmations-dodie smith and i was going to introduce Wind in the Willows this summer but i'm going to delay Wind in the Willows for To Kill a Mockingbird after seeing the price and the fact its 50 this year.

the book itself if you havent read it is well-written, thought provoking and a rare book that makes you laugh, cry and stays with you forever.

this book sparked a different way of life in Alabama and helped people to question how they treat other human beings be they black or white. i believe everyone should read this book it teaches you something about human nature and its not even a chore, the words flow beautifully and it works so well its written in Scouts innocent voice.

i cannot rate this book highly enough but can assure you once you've read it'll be one of your 'top ten' books.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Gets me every time., 19 Oct 2014
By 
S. Shamma "Suad" (Abu Dhabi, UAE) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: To Kill A Mockingbird: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
The thing about rereading a great book is that you get to experience things you might have missed before. To Kill A Mockingbird has always been one of my favourite classics of all time. I first read the book back in college, but I've read many excerpts in high school. Reading it again now, at 26 years old, my God the emotional impact it had on me was not one I expected - especially given the fact that I've read this before and pretty much know everything that happens!

Rereading it also gives me the opportunity to finally write the review it deserves.

Harper Lee created a masterpiece novel, one that is very simple in its form, but very profound in its impact. Told completely from a child's point of view, Scout Finch, we are taken on a journey that could absolutely take your breath away - if you allow it.

Scout Finch is quite a special little girl, who does not know how to filter her thoughts, and is quite outspoken and honest. She's also known to get violent if angered. And she usually only gets angry if you insult her or someone she loves. Although this book may be known as a courtroom drama, it's really anything but. Yes, the father, Atticus Finch is a lawyer, a good one at that. And yes, there is a brief section that occurs almost completely in a courtroom, but the importance of this novel is in the events that happen before and after the courtroom scenes.

I will admit, reading the first section was a little tiresome, what with descriptions of one summer after the other and how Scout and Jem spent their time and their efforts in trying to lure the mysterious, never-seen Boo Radley out of his home. However, I thoroughly enjoyed the conversations the kids would have with their father, who never shied from telling them the truth as it is, teaching them valuable life lessons in the process.

As the story progressed, and the case took precedence in the events of the book, I was absolutely fascinated by the character development that these kids went through, especially Jem as we see him grow up right before our eyes. When Mayella Ewell accuses Tom Robinson of rape, in the eyes of most of the white people of Maycomb, Tom has been tried, convicted and is awaiting execution. Judge Taylor disagrees, and asks Atticus to take Tom's case.

The one scene where the kids go looking for their dad at night and find him guarding the prisoner to protect him from mobs that seeks to lynch Tom Robinson at the jail. Scout instinctively runs to her dad to try and save him from the violence of those confused, morally torn apart men and speaks to Walter Cunningham, asking him about his son and trying to be polite like her father taught her to be. Mr. Cunningham displays his human goodness when Scout’s politeness compels him to disperse the men at the jail. That scene brought tears to my eyes and filled me with so much love and admiration for that little girl but also for the father who raised these children.

This is such a compelling story full of heart. The ending, although read before, still made me emotional.

I love this book, and I cannot recommend it enough.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Powerful!, 28 Sep 2014
This review is from: To Kill A Mockingbird: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
The use of a child to tell this story is powerful and effective. Even tho' I have read this novel many times, the exploits of Scout and Jem and their friend, Dill, are so engaging and play before my eyes. Many moments in this novel touch me. Their curiosity and innocence uncovered life in Maycomb, a town in Deep South America in the 1930s.There were the Cunninghams and their insistence, in spite of their poverty, to pay for help given to them by Scout's and Jem's father. There was Jem's defence of his father who was on the side of fairness and justice. There was the courtroom scene where people from different backgrounds recognised and respected decent human behaviour. There was Tom, a black American, who lost his fight for his innocence against the charges levied on him. I find it difficult to find fault in this novel. I suppose, if I was picky, it is that the words and therefore perceptions of Scout about what she witnessed and felt were not that of a child on many occasions but there could be artistic licence about this. I am always impressed about how the affection of Scout for her father shines through. Harper lee's novel remains one of my favourite books that I dip in and out.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Harper Lee's classic story, 15 Sep 2010
This review is from: To Kill A Mockingbird: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
Great book and a genuine classic. Written with strong characters and a teasing story which will leave you wanting more and more, to the point of making some read it in one sitting!

The story is fascinating, engrossing, and utterly captivating as the drama cleverly unfolds. The narrating character 'Scout', unveils the hypocrisy of some people in a fictional American town during the Great Depression - in their attitudes towards people of a different colour, economic status and different religion as well as people with disabilities. Human nature in 'To Kill A Mocking Bird' is drawn bare as people pass judgement on others without judging themselves first.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just a classic, 20 Jun 2014
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This review is from: To Kill A Mockingbird: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
After finding out (to my horror) that my partner had never read 'To Kill a Mockingbird', I instantly hopped on to Amazon to buy a copy. I had to do this quickly before Michael Gove and his 'conservative buddies' ordered a mass burning of all texts that weren't by English authors.

I read this book for GCSE English 18 years ago, and I loved it that much I chose to write about it for 'A' level English Literature two years later.*(See below)

Now I'm not going to give a synopsis here because:

1. That would give the story away, and if you're wanting to buy a book, you want to read the story first hand by yourself.

and...

2. That is what 'Wikipedia' is for lazy!

I am certainly going to read this book again, as it is just simply a fantastic book. Harper Lee does really well at transporting the reader into the sleepy town of Maycomb and all that is going on. She also expertly brings out the readers emotions - laughter, tears, sheer horror.

This is a book that you remember for life. So do yourself a favour - if you haven't read it, buy a copy now!

*Ok, the 'A' Level time was purely out of laziness, as we had to read 3 books and write a giant essay about them all. I figured to myself I'd choose one of the books that I had already read to make life easier, and by golly gosh, it did. There was no 'Wikipedia' back then sadly!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Possibly the best story ever told., 7 Jan 2014
This review is from: To Kill A Mockingbird: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
I first read ' To Kill a Mockingbird' when I was 11 and my mum was studying it in college (1967). The story and the moral values of Atticus have stayed with me since then. As an adult reading it again I was struck by the piece where Dill cries because the prosecutor spoke so demeaningly to Tom Robinson and Dill knew it to be truly wrong for one person to behave like that to another. Perhaps this was because Dill had experienced this in his own short life. I like to think that the humanity displayed in this book has helped me to walk in others shoes and be less judgemental. It may be a small book but it contains an enormous and relevant truth for us all.
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To Kill A Mockingbird: 50th Anniversary Edition
To Kill A Mockingbird: 50th Anniversary Edition by Harper Lee (Paperback - 24 Jun 2010)
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