Customer Reviews


149 Reviews
5 star:
 (75)
4 star:
 (40)
3 star:
 (18)
2 star:
 (13)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


60 of 61 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Saying goodbye to a friend
Well I suppose I should first admit that I am a fan of Mankell's famous Swedish detective, & I have read every book, in chronological order, over the last five years. For those of you who might be put off reading the Wallander books as you've seen the tv versions, please don't be. The dramatised tv & film versions are a vague shadow of the books.

I won't try...
Published on 3 April 2011 by Average User

versus
61 of 66 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Was never going to live up to expectation
It would seem that public, or maybe publisher, demand rather forced Mankell into one last Wallander novel. In interviews in the decade or so since the last one he had said he he thought that the series had run its course, and he didn't feel he had anything new to bring to the character. Indeed he had started out to create a new series featuring Wallander's daughter Linda...
Published on 29 Mar 2011 by Alex


‹ Previous | 1 2 315 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars End of the line, 3 Sep 2011
By 
M. C. Morris "Low Cost Flyer" (Wales, GB) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As this is the final book in the Wallander series it is therefore essential reading for fans of the Swedish detective. Henning Mankell had said that he would not kill Kurt off but that it would become obvious that he would not be able to carry on in his job. However, fans who were expecting the usual scenario of Inspector Wallander solving cases in and around Ystad with his regular colleagues will be disappointed as most of the storyline is centered around Stockholm and its neighbouring islands. And the case is not even his - he has only involved himself voluntarily because it concerns the disappearance of his daughter's partner's parents. Wallander also reflects on past cases and a very close friend from previous books makes a brief unexpected appearance. It is important to read "The Troubled Man" to bring closure to the series but I missed the Ystad setting (my car registration is Y5TAD, so how's that for a fan? !!).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Two troubled men, actually...., 10 Jun 2011
By 
Wynne Kelly "Kellydoll" (Coventry, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
There are, in fact, two troubled men in this book. The first is Haken von Enke - a retired naval officer still worried about Cold War espionage. He is the father of the partner of Wallander's pregnant daughter, Linda. Soon after meeting Wallender von Enke disappears. Then his wife Louise if found murdered. Wallender is determined to find out what has happened to both of them and who is responsible for betraying Swedish naval secrets to the Russians.....

The second troubled man is Kurt Wallander. He has turned 60, is not in great health, drinks too much, exercises too little and frets a lot. But most worrying of all are his memory lapses. He forgets whole episodes of the recent past and this worries him so much he is reluctant to talk to his doctor. We readers cannot be sure as to how ill he is - but it is obviously a device for ensuring that this is well and truly his last case.

A previous love interest of Wallander re-appears. Baiba Liepa remembers Kurt fondly and visits to tell him she is dying of cancer. Fortunately the general gloom of death, decay and betrayal are lightened by the birth of his grandchild.....

The Troubled Man moves at a cracking pace and keeps you on your toes guessing what might happen. Certainly as good as the previous books and a fitting farewell to Scandinavian crime's best loved policeman.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good book but a sad end to a friend, 27 Aug 2012
By 
Monsieur (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Troubled Man: A Kurt Wallander Mystery (Paperback)
I've read nearly all of the Wallander series of books and have now just re-started again with Faceless Killers. I read The Troubled Man over a period of a week and in some ways I'm glad I did but in others I regret reading it.

In this book the story is typical Wallander - dogged, grumpy and tenacious. The story centres on a missing couple and brings in strands from the cold war, Berlin and Soviet submarines. Good, solid story that kept me hooked and entertained.

I won't spoil the ending for those who haven't read it yet but suffice to say I wish, in many, many ways, that I hadn't read the book. I hate farewells and this was just that.

Maybe sounds a little strange but I wish that Mankell hadn't written this book and left the character to continue. I never wanted the Wallander series to end. This book does just that.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Grown up gloom., 19 Mar 2012
This review is from: The Troubled Man: A Kurt Wallander Mystery (Paperback)
I've never been that enthralled by the plots in Wallander stories,either on TV or in book form.They always seem to be a bit earnest and predictable. I didn't find this one much different and it took a long time to get where it eventually went.

However, Wallander is not just a detective, as many of his fans would agree. He's also a man,approaching old age and struggling with the worries and regrets that come with it. I think Mankell balanced this novel firmly toward the non cop aspects of his hero and in doing so gave us more of an investigation of ageing than of a crime.The meandering nature of the plot allowed him scope to examine Wallander's fears and troubles at some length and with some success.The crushing final moments of the novel gained emotional force as a result.

Perhaps being the same age as Wallander is in the book made me receptive to Mankell's theme and therefore too willing to forgive the shortcomings of the detective element but,for whatever reason, I found this an interesting and humane piece of work.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A really enjoyable book, 7 Mar 2012
This review is from: The Troubled Man: A Kurt Wallander Mystery (Paperback)
I didn't realise this would be the last Wallander book. I assumed his forgetfulness and moods would be put down to a medical condition and a cure would be found!! I was really shocked and surprised when I read the last page.
The book itself was excellent and the story line kept you guessing until near the end.
I don't agree with others when they say the writing could reflect the author. Those of us of a certain age have similar feelings and I think this mirrors real life in some ways. A very clever way of dealing with Wallander as he couldn't go on forever, could he? Recommend it to anyone looking for a good book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top class writing, 4 July 2011
By 
Michael E. Wood "Bookbear" (Thornton LancashireUK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Henning Mankell sets the standards very high his characters are well developed and the plot gradually picks up pace drawing you into a race to get to the end. Excellent writing by a master of the genre.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A landmark novel, 23 Jun 2011
By 
I. Bryant "Ian Bryant" (Puycalvel France) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As if we didn't already know that Mankell is a good story-teller 'The Troubled Man' is lasting evidence that he (aided by his translator) is a great writer.
First and foremost the book is a valediction about an unhappy man's life rather than a crime novel. It has layers beneath the rather conventional plot and you need to be familiar with all the previous Wallander books to understand all the nuances.
The plot is far from Mankell's best, creeping into Le Carre territory ("Kurt Smiley")and thus out of character with Wallander's life of coping with mundane crime, but that's unimportant as it is just a web on which to hang his largely retrospective thoughts.
Above all it paints a clear picture of the problems that must face million of people approaching retirement after a long and busy career, often with few or no interests outside their work and with but a handful of friends at best.
I'm a lot older than Wallander and found this book very moving.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All good things must end, 17 May 2011
By 
H. L. Wilcox "Heather" (Cardiff) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Clearly this is the last Wallander book and one outside the usual cops and robbers format. It held my attention from the first page to the last.
Wallander is on a downward path. Nearing retirement he mourns for the vigour of his past and sees only an empty old age. As one a few years older that the Wallander of the book, and suffering some of his physical symptoms, I can see that the description of the aging Wallander is finely drawn and oh so true to life. There is much more here than the main story.
We dare not hope for another Kurt Wallander story but his daughter Linda is about to return from maternity leave. Perhaps we will see a second Linda Wallander book. PLease.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fitting end..., 29 April 2011
By 
bloodsimple (nottingham, uk) - See all my reviews
And so it ends. The final Wallander book. For those who have followed the entire series, this is an odd experience. Mankell hasn't written Wallander for many years, and at times it almost seems as though he is feeling his way back into the character. Some aspects that experienced Wallander fans have long known, are presented here as fresh. In fact, someone who had never read a Mankell could pick up the necessary back story in this one novel. In some ways this jars, as if we are being re-told what we already know.

However, in this novel Wallander's status as a metaphor for post-Palme Sweden is taken to its ultimate conclusion, as Wallander contemplates retirement and demise. I expected to feel more poignant about Wallander's decline, but for some reason this felt both lacking in emotion, and already taken for granted by the reader. We do not expect a surprise of sunny uplands for the character. Mankell does not cheat us by suddenly changing Wallander or his life, and for that we should be grateful. The author should stay true to the character he has created, and Mankell does so here.

Overall, this is not the best Wallander book, but it is, in many ways, a fitting conclusion. For those who dislike the final paragraph; I disagree. It fitted with how I wanted it to end, both in tone and brevity.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A huge mistake, 7 May 2011
By 
Ana Maria Molina Sanchez (Terrassa,Barcelona, Spain) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I feel "The Troubled Man" should never have been written and it pains me to say so since I have been a fan of the Wallander series for a long time.I found the previous books dealt with the important issues of our time in a truly compelling way and I enjoyed the story lines as well as the characters in each of them.
Not this time around, though. Mankell was clearly reluctant to write this book .Who knows, maybe he was forced by his publishers or he just needed the cash. In any case, that reluctance taints the whole story, which I found confusing, repetitive, badly written and poorly edited; the new characters are less than engaging and the old ones ( Baiba, Mona, Linda...) are just there as an excuse to emphasize Wallander's bitterness, not as real people with real relatable problems.
As for the final paragraph, I'm going to pretend I never read it. I'll just say it was shockingly cruel and resentful, as if Mankell hated Wallander.
Wallander deserved much better!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 315 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Troubled Man: A Kurt Wallander Mystery
The Troubled Man: A Kurt Wallander Mystery by Henning Mankell (Paperback - 16 Feb 2012)
£5.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews