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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Long Live Freedom?
This book is by the American (I think) lady journalist who blew open the UK Parliament's expenses scandal and one had to wonder where were all those highly-paid "political experts" on BBC, press etc, who seemed to be willing to cooncur with the freeloading and outright fraud of our so-called "democratic representatives". Heather Brooke is heroic and deserves more...
Published on 20 Aug 2010 by Ian Millard

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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Tabloid polemic, possibly true, but unsupported by evidence. Disappointing
Heather Brooks has established her reputation by exposing the MP's expenses scandal, and she makes serious and worrying criticisms of the way we are governed, and the way politicians and civil servants misuse and manipulate information. She argues that the public are entitled to transparency and openness about how money is spent, and how decisions are made, and that the...
Published on 23 Jun 2011 by sceptic


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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars stickman, 6 May 2011
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Gave up half way. I am sure we all know not to trust governments. It would have been more readable if it had been written as a novel.
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14 of 32 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Right wing rant about the state, 6 April 2011
This review is from: The Silent State: Secrets, Surveillance and the Myth of British Democracy (Paperback)
I bought this book expecting to read an exciting tale about uncovering state secrets and a reasoned argument for a more open society. Unfortunately the book has obviously been written in a rush, presumably to capitalise on the M.P.s' expenses scandal in which Brooke played a key part, and barely hides the author's neo-con view of the ideal size of the state ( minuscule ). The whole denouement of state information gathering proceeds at a breathless, shock-horror pace without ever pausing to consider what information authorities might legitimately need to gather to e.g. protect children, monitor the effects of state expenditure or spot patterns of crime. Brooke records that there is an awful lot of information gathering by the modern state but then fails to analyse what is needed, what is duplicated and what can be rationalised. The author is not even consistent in her approach to information gathering, bewailing the fact that the local police force cannot give her information on crime in her area. The country desperately needs an intelligent debate about what information the state needs to gather and for what purpose but, disappointingly, this book contributes little to those discussions
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The Silent State: Secrets, Surveillance and the Myth of British Democracy
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