Customer Reviews


36 Reviews
5 star:
 (8)
4 star:
 (12)
3 star:
 (13)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars society reflected back as it is
Gene Kerrigan is one of Ireland's leading columnists and a keen observer and critic of Irish social and political life. In The Rage he weaves together a whole series of astute observations regarding the financial crisis, the property bust, the Ryan Report and Church abuses, and gangland crime. The writing is superb, with prose that is engaging and well paced, credible...
Published on 9 May 2012 by Rob Kitchin

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Shooting Spree
A Detective Sergeant who still shares a bed with his estranged wife, a professional thief with criminal friends, a dead body, and a septuagenarian nun. The corpse belongs to a crooked banker whose murder is being investigated by DS Bob Tidey, which brings him into contact, and gains knowledge of, sometimes fortuitously, with everyone else involved in Gene Kerrigan's...
Published on 4 Jun. 2011 by Quiverbow


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars society reflected back as it is, 9 May 2012
By 
Rob Kitchin - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Rage (Paperback)
Gene Kerrigan is one of Ireland's leading columnists and a keen observer and critic of Irish social and political life. In The Rage he weaves together a whole series of astute observations regarding the financial crisis, the property bust, the Ryan Report and Church abuses, and gangland crime. The writing is superb, with prose that is engaging and well paced, credible dialogue and a range of nicely penned characters that feel like real people. Kerrigan does a fine job at tugging and twisting the various strands together to produce a compelling narrative. Whilst there are resolutions with respect to both the Sweetman and Naylor cases, I like that Kerrigan has left them somewhat ambiguous and unsettling. It fits with the whole unsettling feel of the book. For anyone who lives in Ireland what is disconcerting is that reading the novel feels like seeing society reflected back as it is, rather than simply reading a story. Excellent stuff.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Shooting Spree, 4 Jun. 2011
By 
Quiverbow (Kent, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Rage (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
A Detective Sergeant who still shares a bed with his estranged wife, a professional thief with criminal friends, a dead body, and a septuagenarian nun. The corpse belongs to a crooked banker whose murder is being investigated by DS Bob Tidey, which brings him into contact, and gains knowledge of, sometimes fortuitously, with everyone else involved in Gene Kerrigan's fourth novel. And that's the main problem with `The Rage'; there are too many names mentioned. Many belong to villains that do the odd job for someone further up the ladder of crime and sometimes it's difficult to keep track of remembering who they are.

That some are involved in the side helping of the killing of the banker, and, as it turns out, an earlier murder, does not detract from the main course of the build-up and enactment of Vincent Naylor's frenzy when he hears his brother has been shot by the police - hence the book's title. Though the vernacular may not be to everyone's taste -and it obviously represents the people of the place - Kerrigan's description of Dublin through Tidey, Rose Cheney, his partner on this case at least, and the other characters paint a vivid picture of the city in economic decline.

As to the story itself, it does jump about a bit too much at times and one particular passage concerning the nun's past seems rather irrelevant. However, countering that is the sympathy you have with Naylor's brother when he realises the game is up. Crooked he may be, but the author conveys that, in his brief death throes, he realises how wasteful it has all been. As for the main villain, all you feel is hatred as he struts around as the big `I am', walking over people simply because they happen to be weaker. (Whatever he tells everyone what he thinks of his hairdresser girlfriend, he still lies to her when she's waiting for him. Maybe that's what people such as this do.) The original murder (one of ten people who end up dead) is also solved but is left to fizzle out once the perpetrator's name has been mentioned a couple of times. Another perculiarity is the way Kerrigan uses italics for the thoughts of the characters, but that might just be his style.

That the age old favourite of detective stories of the main protagonist being taken off the case, sent on gardening leave but managing to put everything right, is trotted out is best ignored as `The Rage' turns out to be better than the first few pages suggest.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Standard fare that passes the time, 19 Oct. 2012
This review is from: The Rage (Paperback)
I wasn't going to bother reviewing this book. But I've just discovered it's won the Crime Writers Association (CWA) Gold Dagger for best crime novel of the year, which really surprises me. It's a perfectly decent piece of crime fiction - but no more than that. Pretty predictable and with an unremarkable cast of characters. There must surely be many better books recently published in this genre. 3 1/2 stars would be about right.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An OK thriller, 29 July 2011
By 
Rosslock "rosslock" (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Rage (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This is an OK thriller. I think the reason why I say that is that I did read and finish it quickly, but found nothing really original about the story line or characters. There was no 'twist', it was all pretty obvious how the story was going to pan out. The characters were a bit two dimensional, no real originality here either.
So, although I finished it - normally a good sign - I now feel there was nothing memorable about this book.

It was OK. Thats about it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gripping, 12 Mar. 2013
By 
col2910 (Bedfordshire,UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Rage (Paperback)
Synopsis/blurb....
Winner of the 2012 Crime Writers' Association Gold Dagger for Best Crime Novel
Vincent Naylor, a professional thief, is fresh out of jail. His latest project, an armed robbery, is just days away.
Bob Tidey, an honest, hardworking policeman, dedicated to public service, is about to commit perjury.
Maura Coady, a retired nun living in a Dublin backstreet, is lost in bad memories and regrets. Then, she sees something that she can't ignore, and makes a phone call that will unleash a storm of violence.
As one of the reading challenges I have set for myself, I'm trying to read one book a month that has been a recipient of a major crime writing award. Kerrigan's The Rage won the 2012 CWA Gold Dagger and as it was a Christmas present from my better half just a few months ago it seemed as good a book as any to be reading right now. Familiarity with Kerrigan's previous work was an added incentive to crack the spine on this. I read Little Criminals a fair few years ago and more recently his Dark Times In The City; both of which were extremely enjoyable.
Dublin, post-Tiger crash is the setting for Kerrigan's Rage. It's a collision of forces in what is an increasingly fractured and secular society with a mix of career criminals, police, lawyers, nuns, violence, guns, murder, sex, alcohol, abuse, religion, guilt, damaged families and politics.
As well as providing a driving plot that unfolds quickly, Kerrigan has the ability to depict his characters convincingly. His main villain, Vincent Naylor had enough likeable traits of personality that I was conflicted as to how I wanted the book to conclude. Conversely, his good guys have failings and faults and are all the more believable because of it. Bob Tidey, his policeman isn't above breaking a few rules if it helps him get closer to resolving his investigations, but he never seems to stop caring for the victims he's met along the way. He's flawed but retains a decent sense of humanity. Others are similarly afflicted; people with regrets and guilt over previous failings and poor choices. Real people living real lives.
This is a superb book about modern Dublin and the harsh realities of everyday life, with ever-increasing levels of violence and criminality.
"A world this ugly, I'd rather look away," laments one of the sadder characters within Kerrigan's "Rage," but with writing this crisp you can't.
4 from 5
As mentioned above this was a Christmas present last year - one of my better ones!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Cozy cartels, golden circles - whatever you call them, they're as much a part of this country as the mountains and the bogs.", 16 Feb. 2013
By 
Mary Whipple (New England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Rage (World Noir) (Paperback)
(4.5 stars) Ireland in the second decade of the twenty-first century is in the midst of an economic disaster. The apparently plentiful money supply has dried up, home values have plummeted, and thousands of new houses remain empty or unfinished. Jobs have vanished, and factories and businesses have closed, creating an environment in which good people living on the edge are willing to skirt the law in order to survive. A criminal underworld is flourishing and expanding into new areas as living conditions deteriorate. Even Det. Sgt. Bob Tidey of the Dublin Gardai has taken a pay cut, but he worries about some of the ordinary citizens whom he sees every day, and he is desperate to see that justice is done regarding some of their special cases, not because he believes in some pristine concept of justice but because he wants to protect these good people from death at the hands of criminals.

The epitome of Irish noir, this book explores the gray areas separating clearly right from clearly wrong, blurring the lines between good and evil so completely that it is impossible to find anyone in the novel who is not, at some level, a blend of both good and evil. A banker has been murdered, a nun's life is in danger, and Tidey's own career is in jeopardy, regardless of whether or not he carries out the dangerous (and only) plan of action he can think of.

In subsequent plot lines, Vincent Naylor, pathologically angry and only ten days out of prison for beating up a clerk, is now looking for post-prison "work." He has already committed murder for the crime bosses, though he has so far escaped police notice, and he now plans to pull a significant robbery. While parking a getaway car, Vincent is observed from the window of a street by Maura Coady, who has spent her entire adult life as a nun. Suspicious of the activity, Maura calls Tidey. Her story further develops the theme of morality as a gray area. However evil one may think of Victor, one thinks of Maura as the epitome of good, but she, too, has a side darker than one would expect.

The honest employees of a security company who must follow orders from a criminal; Trixie, an ex-con who saves two lives in a fire, though it means that he may be arrested; various criminals with low profiles; and members of the police hierarchy who do not want to take a stand, all play roles in the ensuing action. As the economic downturn gets worse, the willingness of seemingly honest people to perform acts they might not have considered otherwise increases, and the number of murders increases exponentially.

Author Gene Kerrigan's talent at revealing the backstories of his characters, especially that of Det. Sgt. Bob Tidey, makes all these characters more realistic than one would expect of a dark murder mystery. Their moral quandaries are the main focus of the novel, despite the random, bloody violence. Despite the seemingly excessive number of characters and murders, necessitating a running list of who's who (for me), this novel, written in clear and unambiguous prose, achieves a new level for the mystery story, one in which the emphasis on theme and character becomes more important for the author than the sensational outcomes so common to this genre.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Tedious, 7 Feb. 2013
This review is from: The Rage (World Noir) (Paperback)
Gritty crime, contemporary Dublin. Small time crooks are foiled in the course of a `big' job. Two are shot and killed by the Garda (Irish Police). Vincent, brother of one of the men killed, goes on the rampage, tracked by the slightly feckless Detective Sergeant Bob Tidey.

Banker and property speculator Sweetman is gunned down in professional hit in the doorway of his gilded mansion. Small time crook Vincent gets out of prison after a short stretch following an assault on a guy who annoyed him slightly in the HMV shop. Bob Tidey witnesses some minor police brutality while having a pint and a sandwich in the pub and can't be bothered with the hassle being a witness will involve so pretends to have seen nothing, but has been caught on camera witnessing the events and is public chastised by the judge.

After some petty thefts for `walking around money' Vincent, his brother Noel and two cronies plan the complex robbery of a security van, involving two kidnappings, holding the family of the head of security ransom, etc. It's the kind of crime we all recognize from the news. The gang park a getaway car outside the house of former nun Maura Coady several days in advance. Maura eventually reports the suspicious car to Bob Tidey, who she knows from previous events. The Garda stake out the car and shoot Noel and his accomplice. Noel is actually surrendering at the time and is killed in the crossfire. Vincent and Liam stash the cash as planned.

Sweetman, the banker, has been killed by a gun which was involved in shooting of a small time druggie some years ago, which makes very little sense to anyone.

This is a confusing mess really. Another half-baked 'passionate about writing' moron trying to write a series of potbloilers
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not gripping, not thrilling, definitely forgettable., 17 Aug. 2011
By 
O E J - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Rage (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I've read more than a few gripping thrillers, but this isn't one of them - it's just something to read if you've nothing much else to do. It's my first experience of any work by Gene Kerrigan but not only has he published three previous novels (one of which, to his credit, was nominated for a CWA Gold Dagger Award) he's apparently well known as a journalist for a Sunday newspaper too.

The Rage is a story set in contemporary Dublin with all its economic and social problems. On the good side you have DS Bob Tidey investigating a murder, on the shadier side you have ex-con Vincent Naylor, fresh out of the nick but quite prepared to run the risk of going back again. There's a retired nun in the mix too, whose real significance to the plot is rather hard to justify. The 'rage' relates to Naylor's emotions following a security-heist that goes wrong, and his quest for revenge.

Personally I cannot recommend it. It offers nothing in the way of an attractive writing style, the story-line and overall concept are just par-for-the-course, the characters are disposable and forgettable and I could hardly care less what happened to any of them for better or worse. If you hardly ever read books, then this might amuse and entertain, but if you're a regular reader of crime fiction then get ready for another ho-hum same-as-all-the-others piece of mediocre material; I wouldn't go so far as to say it's bad because it's not, but if you're looking for what's claimed to be a 'masterpiece of suspense' and one that is 'gripping and thrilling from first page to last', give this a miss because you will be underwhelmed and very likely disappointed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Real, 24 Sept. 2011
By 
Brian Hamilton "brianhamilton14" (Scotland, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Rage (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Kerrigan writes with a gritty realism that hits hard and has lasting impact. His characters are various shades of bad with few redeeming features amongst them. What they are though, is smart. This is crime committed with thought, not desperation and irrational behaviour as its cue.

The story unfolds at a good pace and the ideas and writing are of good quality, certainly enough to keep going through the book to find out how it all pans out.

All in all a good crime book that smells more like home than the usual American noir.

Recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Strange title, 5 Jun. 2013
By 
Michael Watson "skirrow22" (Halifax, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Rage (Paperback)
Gritty, workmanlike story of the underbelly of Dublin noir, well told in this thriller which is described in far more garish terms in the blurb than actually is to be found in the book.

Vincent Naylor is, I suppose, the subject of the title but doesn't come across as the man filled with pent-up rage. He's a killer for sure but the story has him set out on a theft - a big theft which goes badly wrong, two of the four robbers killed by the Armed Response Team. That one of those killed is Vincent's brother becomes the reasoning behind the title.

Enter Sergeant Bob Tidey, one of Dublin's finest though he casts a dark shadow in some places. He's not, at first, involved in the hunt for the armed robbers now on the run but, little by little, his road leads to the inevitable conclusion.

In and amongst, we learn quite a lot about Tidey and his social life. He has his problems, of course; where would a crime thriller be if the main man was anything but a problematic individual? But he's a likeable soul, bending the rules, getting the job done and keeping his finger on the crime belly of the Dublin underworld.

I liked the book and will follow on with the next in the series, in the fond hope that there will still be a few criminals left in Dublin, apart from the white collar characters who helped bring about Ireland's rapid descent into financial ruin.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Rage
The Rage by Gene Kerrigan (Paperback - 3 May 2012)
£6.39
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews