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8 Reviews
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wodehouse in the Pink.
By 1970 at the age of eighty eight I don't think anyone would be surprised that Wodehouse was not the writer he had been and indeed two of his three last novels `Company for Henry' and `Do Butlers Burgle Banks?' although by no means stinkers had been a blot on the old escutcheon but returning to Blandings with `A Pelican at Blandings' had reengaged his muse and `The Girl...
Published on 4 July 2008 by Ian Wood, Author of 'Here's 2 ...

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3.0 out of 5 stars Twee
This was quite a twee novel that was enjoyable for the most part but I did feel it jumped from character to character a little bit and it often took a few sentences to realise which scene you were in. There were some comic moments and the usual escapades of characters needing money while others fall in and out of love with each other. Full of the usual stereotypes as...
Published 9 months ago by Rachel


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wodehouse in the Pink., 4 July 2008
This review is from: The Girl in Blue (Paperback)
By 1970 at the age of eighty eight I don't think anyone would be surprised that Wodehouse was not the writer he had been and indeed two of his three last novels `Company for Henry' and `Do Butlers Burgle Banks?' although by no means stinkers had been a blot on the old escutcheon but returning to Blandings with `A Pelican at Blandings' had reengaged his muse and `The Girl in Blue' is one of his greatest works.

`The Girl in Blue' is a Gainsborough miniature which has gone missing and the suspicion is that it has been stolen from Willoughby Scrope and transported to Mellingham hall, seat of his brother Crispin Scrope. Their nephew, Jerry, is charged with recovering the picture and though he doesn't find it he finds love and a Broker's man posing as a butler. All would be well in Jerry's world except that he is already engaged to Vera Upshaw whom greatly admires his trust fund enormously and Wodehouse must disentangle him before he can join his soul mate in the best of all possible worlds.

A Wodehouse original novel which despite a casual reference to Johnny Halliday from `A Pelican at Blandings' doesn't rely on any of the masters stock characters and even if it does dip into his stock of plot mechanisms it does leave us in the pink rather than the blue.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Girl in blue, Reader in the pink, 6 July 2010
This review is from: The Girl in Blue (Paperback)
It's quite remarkable that nearly 70 years after his first book was published, and a year shy of 90, Wodehouse was still able to turn out such a warm and delightful tale. The tangled plot revolves around the theft of a Gainsborough miniature from a wealthy solicitor, and pulls together a wonderful crowd of characters from the upper echelons of Brtish and American society. Suspicions of who the thief is lead to different but linked parties attempting its recovery, all while staying in the country pile of the solictor's brother. Chaos is guaranteed, but out of it may come love and happiness for all concerned. Light, airy and uplifting!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Silliness, 16 Jan 2011
This review is from: The Girl in Blue (Hardcover)
Anyone who reads a lot of Wodehouse learns quite quickly that you need to give yourself breaks. If you read two or three in a row, as I have done a few times, you find that characters begin to blur and plot structures become so familiar you find yourself predicting the next unlikely scrape that will befall our hapless characters. If, however, you read plenty of other authors and genres and then return to PG for some light entertainment you simply cannot go wrong. 'The Girl in Blue' is one of his stand-alone books, not connected with any other work but nevertheless is of course populated with many familiar Wodehouseian characters. Our happily inadequate hero Jerry must track down the despicable individual who has stolen a Gainsborough miniature, the `girl in blue' of the title, from his Uncle. As usual confusion and misunderstanding abound and of course Jerry has problems of his own. Having fallen in love at first sight whilst serving as a juror he must disengage himself from his shallow betrothed and her harridan of a mother before his love can be his.

Not one of the best but worth reading as always, just don't read too many back to back...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Short, sweet, but samey, 27 Jan 2014
By 
J. R. Johnson-Rollings (West Midlands, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Girl in Blue (Hardcover)
A classic Wodehouse work following the brief adventures of Jerry West and various family members, who suffer the typical problems in the arenas of money and love.

My main issue with the Wodehouse novels I've read over the past few years is how similar they are, but that might be an artefact of my buying them as a set. However they make for pleasant light reading and remain an enjoyable and relaxing read.

With this particular novel, I felt that the ending was rather abrupter than I'd expected, with plenty of plot points going unresolved, which left me a little frustrated. Overall though a happily spent few hours with some of the lovely turns of phrase that Wodehouse scatters throughout his work.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Twee, 5 Dec 2013
This review is from: The Girl in Blue (Paperback)
This was quite a twee novel that was enjoyable for the most part but I did feel it jumped from character to character a little bit and it often took a few sentences to realise which scene you were in. There were some comic moments and the usual escapades of characters needing money while others fall in and out of love with each other. Full of the usual stereotypes as well - the posh lawyer, skint Country Manor owner and the east end London crook/debt collector. Not one of the best Wodehouse books I've read but it was pleasant enough before bed.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable, 13 Mar 2010
By 
Censuwine (Balzan, Malta) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Girl in Blue (Paperback)
It seems harsh awarding four stars for what is, after all, a thoroughly enjoyable novel. It is very good but perhaps the loss of a star is due to the fact that it cannot be placed on an equal ranking with the Wooster novels and the short stories by Mulliner. Of course, one does not read Wodehouse for the story itself but more for the impressive gift of phrase of the author.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 18 May 2010
By 
Aquinas "summa" (celestial heights, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Girl in Blue (Paperback)
Perhaps I have read too many Wodehouses recently but I found this a little disappointing. This is a very late one in Wodehouse's career and I really felt as if the magic had almost disappeared - the effortless humour and timeless atmosphere was no longer there and it was if this was just another one he was churning out. The usual features are here: a possible theft, in this case of the girl in blue, a Gainsborough minature, engagements and broken engagements and, of course, a country house (with fake butler). Anyway whilst the story was entertaining I finished with a sense of deflation and with a sense of loss that comic greatness had departed, so to speak.
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4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not a typical Wodehouse, but very good all the same, 22 May 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Girl in Blue (Paperback)
Most people, on reading this book, will be suprised to discover that "the girl in blue" is not the love interest of the story. She (the title, not the love interest) is a Gainsborough minature. P.G.W's highly enjoyable novel deals with fine art, kleptomania, private detectives, and the running costs of country houses. Sounds interesting? Good. Read it.
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The Girl in Blue
The Girl in Blue by P.G. Wodehouse (Paperback - 2 Oct 2008)
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