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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An exceptional read., 21 Oct. 2006
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This review is from: Typhoon Pilot (Paperback)
Simply put, an excellent read. Desmond Scott put as much into this book as he did his flying career and that was a lot!! The humour of the barrack room antics is finely balanced with the sadness of tragic losses such as that of a close close friend on a runway in Germany. Mr Scotts accounts of his frustration at, as he saw it, having to bail out the army make for evocative disscussion and his accounts of seeing the devestation wrought by his Typhoons first hand for himself on the ground make for horrific but nonetheless fascinating reading. The fun, the excitement, the fear and the relief of operations are all in this book. Read it and judge for yourself.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great story well told, 25 Feb. 2012
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This review is from: Typhoon Pilot (Paperback)
Desmond Scott had already flown two tours on Hurricanes before he came to fly Typhoons. At that time there were dark rumours about the plane, but Desmond Scott amongst many others proved what a superb and under-rated aircraft the Typhoon was. Read this book and make up your own mind. The author started his Typhoon career escorting Bombphoons over France, where he racked up a small score against German fighters. He then flew Bombphoons himself, before some bright spark strapped some rockets to the wings of a Typhoon and a legend was born. Through his skill and knowledge he went on to become a wing commander.

The author writes, unsurprisingly, with great authority about the war waged by Typhoon squadrons. He was heavily committed to the ground attack role flying against various targets, from E-boats and airfields, to V2 launch sites. Before D-Day they hammered away at German infrastructure, including well protected radar sites, which cost the lives of many pilots. He flew over the D-day battlefield and was soon in action against ground targets. He is rightfully scathing about Monty grabbing the accolades for victory, when it was the air arm that had been so decisive in the defeat of the German forces. For the hard work carried out by fighter/bomber pilots and for the terrible losses they incurred the small amount of credit they did receive must have left a bitter taste in the mouth.

This book is superbly written and if, like me, you didn't know anything about the valuable role carried out by the British fighter bomber before and after D-Day then this book will enlighten you to many interesting facts.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Typhoon Reviewd, 3 Nov. 2010
This review is from: Typhoon Pilot (Paperback)
A really good well written down to earth book about life as a Typhoon pilot in WWII. I had no idea that the Typhoon was such a successful aircraft as I had been lead to believe that it was a failed fighter turned ground attck aircraft. In reality, the Typhoon was not bad as a low level fighter, but was the premeier ground attack aircraft of WWII.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Desmond Scott’s account of flying with the 2TAF: poignant, terrifying, occasionally humorous, 12 Jun. 2014
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The Guardian (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Typhoon Pilot (Paperback)
This short 162-page book describes the author's experiences in the RAF during the latter part of WW2. The focus is on his operational flying career with the Hawker Typhoon close-support fighter-bomber and as Squadron Leader, Wing Commander and later as the youngest-ever (at aged 25) RAF Group Captain in the 2nd Tactical Air Force during the NW European campaign through 1944-45.

Desmond Scott was a New Zealander and understandably NZ pilots serving with the RAF feature strongly in the narrative, but not exclusively so as the 2TAF was always an international force containing Brits, Australians, Canadians, Belgians, French, Dutch, Poles, Czechs and Norwegians flying and fighting side by side.

Scott was involved in so many operations where he came within a hair's breadth of being killed that it's a wonder he survived the war. The life of a Typhoon pilot was daily on the line, flying at an altitude often too low for parachute deployment through murderous flak whilst pressing home attacks with cannon and 60lb rocket projectiles against German armoured formations, reinforced bunkers and V1 launching sites. In appalling weather and over-stressed, almost as many pilots came to grief in landing accidents on makeshift airfields in France & the Low Countries as were killed in combat, and the book is replete with poignant accounts of the loss of friends and comrades-in-arms as well as those rescued from the sea and others captured as POWs after being shot down. All this is recounted with admirable brevity of language and great vividness, in a punchy and engaging style.

There's a lighter side too. The narrative is punctuated by anecdotes - many laugh-out-loud funny and a few risqué verging on outrageous - describing the author's close encounters with people like Noel Coward, Vivienne Leigh, Dwight Eisenhower - whom the author met on two occasions and whom he held in the highest esteem - Trafford Leigh Mallory, Home Secretary Anthony Eden (who became a close personal friend of the author) and NZ PM Peter Fraser, whom Scott didn't like at all.

Overall this is a great book about the war experiences of NZ's most celebrated and decorated aviator, who turns out to be an excellent writer and in every way an extraordinary and exceptional individual. If you like this kind of book you'll probably like this too, and enjoy reading it.

BTW the sequel `One More Hour' filling in some details missing from `Typhoon Pilot' and with more focus on the author's early war experiences flying the Hawker Hurricane, is almost as good and an indispensable companion-book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommended., 1 May 2014
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This review is from: Typhoon Pilot (Paperback)
Very pleased with the book and the service provided. This is an excellent book, highly recommended to any ww2 or aircraft enthusiast.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Worth finding a copy., 26 Jan. 2015
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Dr. David Arelette (Yarrambat, Victoria Australia) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Typhoon Pilot (Paperback)
Scott in his unassuming New Zealand way tells his riveting story without the glamour of the Spitfire squadrons where they spent much of their war at ground level attacking German convoys subject to enemy fire from all sides - it's not an easy book to find, mine took a few years and then was second of third hand, bit it's worth the task of finding a copy.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is another tribute to some very brave men, 13 April 2013
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This review is from: Typhoon Pilot (Paperback)
Those of us who saw-off a few Fw190-s or Tiger tanks, with our Airfix Hawker Typhoons, prior to being called-in for tea, by our mum's, in the 1960's, would do well to read this book.
This book reminds us that war is a dangerous business and that the cockpit of a Typhoon was never, ever, a safe place.

I survived my late teens and my twenties because I was the pilot of a Hillman Minx. If you'd given me a Hawker Typhoon, goodness knows what would have happened....
In this book, it does.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Typhoon Pilot,a deadly occupation, 31 May 2013
This review is from: Typhoon Pilot (Paperback)
If you're a student of the air war in Northern Europe you've probably already read this,if not,this is a great book to learn about Typhoon operations.
I've read several books by Typhoon pilots and about Typhoon operations.This one is up with the best.
Scott was in from the start so his story covers the whole of the Typhoon story until the end of the war.
It was one of the deadliest occupations of the war,most missions meant facing a storm of flak and at the low levels they operated,a damaged Typhoon often proved fatal.
They proved even more deadly to the Germans though,causing massive casualties with rocket and cannon attacks.
Eventually they started to run out of Typhoon pilots in Normandy and Spitfire pilots were asked to volunteer for Typhoons,there were no takers.
Scott ended up commanding a Typhoon wing,he comes across as a very likeable person and his writing style is easy to read.
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Typhoon Pilot
Typhoon Pilot by Desmond Scott (Paperback - 4 July 1991)
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