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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A departure in style that works
Initially I wasn't sure about the style of Palahniuk's new book. As an oral history, it pieces together some urban folklore style reminisces about the main character, Rant Casey. However, as the book progresses, the connections between people become more apparent. It follows similar ground, socio-politically to Fight Club & Survivor. The urban games part of the book...
Published on 2 Jun 2007 by Jonathan Miller

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Good Book That Ends Too Feverishly
Rant Casey is an icon of the future. He has become a god like creation for the people that live in the dark hours of the day. In the future, society is split between people who work during the day, and those during the night. Treated like second class citizens the nightimers take to dangerous games to keep themselves occupied. One man arrives that will spread a...
Published on 10 July 2007 by Sam Tyler


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A departure in style that works, 2 Jun 2007
By 
Jonathan Miller "mrgeog" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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Initially I wasn't sure about the style of Palahniuk's new book. As an oral history, it pieces together some urban folklore style reminisces about the main character, Rant Casey. However, as the book progresses, the connections between people become more apparent. It follows similar ground, socio-politically to Fight Club & Survivor. The urban games part of the book reminds me of the Santa Rampage in Fugitives & Refugees.

The book does lose its way when it starts to imply a life of Matrix style plug-ins, draconian curfews and conflict between daytime and night time peoples.

However, Palahniuk as usual digs up some fascinating historical parallels to his main story lines and on the whole the new style of writing works.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ranting and Crashing, 1 July 2007
By 
Amazon Customer "Gav" (Cardiff, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Palahnuik takes us to the world of Daytimers and Nighttimers, where the Nightimers spend their evenings engaged in Party Crashing and where Porting has replaced other forms of media.

But the world isn't important, Buster Casey is, and to quote one of the characters - he's, `... the worst Patient Zero in the history of disease'.

Rant Casey carries rabies, but not only carries it, but infects himself and others around him with it again and again. And in doing so becomes a legend, a fable, that spreads much like the rabies he carries from person to person and Rant's oral history is retold through a series of interviews all used to help to explain the bigger picture.

The interview technique is a bit complicated as hearing different points of view and perspectives from several people takes some concentration. Luckily all of the interviewees are named and on their first appearance in each chapter we are told (or retold) a bit more about them like if they are a Party Crasher, Historian, or Mother. You get to know more about some those that were close to Rant and as well as his story as the book progresses. And the in some ways the other people are more interesting than Rant himself.

Palahnuik is an excellent storyteller as he uses this book to explore the spiderwebs of connections that each person has around them. There are no minor characters here. Each has an important role in moving the story forward and in revealing the connections that aren't so obvious as they first appear.

This book is also a tale about the lies we tell ourselves like the tooth fairy who, as you grow up, replaces your useless tooth with money and to Buster Casey teeth are very valuable indeed. Or that if you're wearing a wedding dressed driving a car covered in decorations that you must have just got married.

Rant is not the book I expected it to be. I though that this would be a simple retelling of the life of Buster Casey from those who knew him. Instead it's an exploration of life and how Buster Casey is the secret to a world that you wouldn't think existed.

It does have its flaws mostly due to the style of the short sections meaning it doesn't flow easily on occasion. As you either find yourself hearing from a person you're not particularly interested in (even if what they say is meaningful to the plot) or you loose who is talking and what connection they are to everything.

By the time I got to the end I wanted to start all over again in order to see how what's revealed in the end is already told to you from the beginning. I probably will re-read it was the end is a little more complicated than I expected. This might make it a little disappointing to some readers who want everything a bit more cut and dry or who enjoyed the Party Crashing for just causing chaos.

This was my first Chuck Palahnuik novel and it won't be my last.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Good Book That Ends Too Feverishly, 10 July 2007
By 
Rant Casey is an icon of the future. He has become a god like creation for the people that live in the dark hours of the day. In the future, society is split between people who work during the day, and those during the night. Treated like second class citizens the nightimers take to dangerous games to keep themselves occupied. One man arrives that will spread a disease that will change the way the two societies co-exist.

'Rant' is another strange offering from the master of weird, Chuck Palahniuk. The format is an oral history of Rant's life so is told from various view points by the people that knew him. It takes a little getting used to but the format works well. I really enjoyed the first 3/4 of this book as it introduced twisted, yet intelligent, storylines the like which Palahniuk specialises in. However, I felt that the end went too far into the strange and undid a lot of the good that happened before. This is not one of Palahniuk best books, but still a good read - try the magnificent `Haunted' first.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Modern Speculative Fiction from a Great Talent, 8 April 2008
I thoroughly enjoyed this novel, and was impressed, as ever, with Palaniuk's psychological truth. The futuristic element of this dystopia reminds me of Richard Matheson's work, with the insanity of bureaucratic logic pitted against the needs and desires of the individual. His characters are always skilfully drawn, in at least three dimensions. His female characters are neither ciphers nor stereotypes, always multi-layered individuals.

In all a work which could have been undermined by its structure, its 'oral history' which could so easily have become a 'gimmick' in the wrong hands, instead has its key themes reflected in its very structure; the disrupted time-line, the fractured society the characters live in, and most of all the disjointed personality and personal history of its eponymous protagonist.

Palahniuk differentiates between voices skilfully, yet weaves a seamless narrative. The revelations are suitably disconcerting and, though not entirely unexpected, he explores the implications so fully that even those of the 'the butler did it' mindset, the last page readers, would not feel they wasted their time reading right through.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars subtle but hard work, 5 Oct 2008
This review is from: Rant: The Oral History of Buster Casey (Paperback)
Palahniuk has used the multiple narrative form before, but the oral history conceit of this novel gives him the opportunity for further subtlety and ambiguity. This is more ambitous than some of his recent writings, though full of his usual themes of mutilation, degradation, disease and mortality. well worth the effort though probably not the best introduction to this author.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mind-boggling eighth novel from author of Fight Club, 17 May 2008
By 
Matt Pucci "mattpucci.com" (Here, there and everywhere) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Rant: The Oral History of Buster Casey (Paperback)
Love him or hate him, Chuck Palahniuk is one of the most daring and adventurous writers of his generation. Having made his mark in trail-blazing style with Fight Club (now more than ten years old) the author has garnered praise and criticism in equal measure for his bold, minimalist style, sparse plots and warped characterisation - as well some genuinely stomach-turning descriptive passages. Rant, with its use of multiple narratives to tell the story of Buster 'Rant' Casey - a young man from a town "four hours drive from anywhere" who, in his time, was responsible for the phenomenon known as 'party-crashing' and the spread of rabies among the social underclass (referred to here as 'Nighttimers') - is typical Palahniuk fare. It lacks the rawness and millennial angst of Fight Club or Survivor, and unlike, say, Choke, this is not one you'll be able to read in one sitting. However, Rant sees Palahniuk at his most ambitious and anarchic, as he incorporates elements of science fiction theory (notably, the 'grandfather paradox') into a sustained attack on a whole range of societal conventions.

But it's not just attack for attack's sake. The genius of Palahniuk's work - and of Rant in particular - is in the way it deals with the truly bizarre and uses it to raise questions in our minds about what is really possible. He asks, who says we can't do that? Yes, Rant is complicated, and occasionally shocking. However, look beyond all that and you'll find insights into the human condition, which, however disturbing and far-fetched they may be, are startlingly reminiscent of the truth. I enjoyed this book immensely and even found myself laughing out loud on a number of occasions at the sheer audacity of some of the story's twists.

Highly recommended.

Matt Pucci
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Typically Chuck P., 31 Aug 2008
This review is from: Rant: The Oral History of Buster Casey (Paperback)
"Rant" is full of Chuck P's usual violence, sex, unbalanced characters with a mix of high adrenaline action, philosophy for the 2000's and some truly bizzare moments. It's typically good if you like this sort of literature, but I wouldn't recommend it to someone who's never read Palahniuk before. Start with "Fight Club" and come back to this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another amazing read from Palahniuk, 1 July 2013
By 
Miss AL Holloway (Oswestry) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Rant: The Oral History of Buster Casey (Paperback)
I love Chuck Palahniuk's books, his style of writing and bizzare subject matter really set him apart for me and I must confess he is one of my favourite authors.

Rant is written in the style of an oral history, a collection of anecdotes about Buster "Rant" Casey, told by friends, family members and others who knew him. If you have read any of Palahniuk's work previously, then you know this is not going to be a straightforward tale with a happy ending. It is very weird from start to finish, and the ending left me wishing for a sequel.

As with most of his writing, this is not one to read if you are squeamish or faint hearted, but if you like your books on the dark side, you will most likely enjoy this one.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A Bit Lost, 24 Jan 2009
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Ms. A. E. Davies (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Rant: The Oral History of Buster Casey (Paperback)
I have just finished reading this book and I have to say that it didn't impress me like the other books I've read by Chuck Palahniuk (I started reading it straight after I finished reading Invisible Monsters, which blew me away - I couldn't put it down). I started reading and found myself getting rather lost after a little while. I didn't understand what "Party Crashing" was for a good few chapters after the idea was introduced. It got to the point where I put the book down and couldn't be bothered to pick it up and finish reading it. However, I managed to pick it up this morning and continue reading and I found that in the last 10 chapters, there were some really interesting ideas and everything seemed to make more sense. I don't really think that the format was particularly good, but the ideas in the book provoked thought - and that redeemed it for me.
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5.0 out of 5 stars great, 6 April 2009
By 
Dr. A. DEWITT (london UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Rant: The Oral History of Buster Casey (Paperback)
Rant is easy to read and contains loads of thought provoking concepts, many of which could be made into a novel of their own.

The 'oral history' style of writing looked unusaul and daunting at first but is really easy to get into, makes a refreshing change from ordinary 1st/3rd person narrative, and provides a fantastic opportunity to explore characters from different and sometiems opposing viewpoints.

You won't be dissapoinetd.
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Rant: The Oral History of Buster Casey
Rant: The Oral History of Buster Casey by Chuck Palahniuk (Paperback - 1 May 2008)
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