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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An interesting read, 9 Jun 2007
By 
DubaiReader "MaryAnne" (Rowlands Castle, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Sixth Wife: (Tudor Saga) (Paperback)
I read this book for a book club and was pleasantly surprised. I had previously read only one other book by Ms Plaidy - 'The Heart of the Lion', and found the style a bit simplistic. The 'Sixth Wife' was a more flowing read and completes the series on Henry VIII's queens.

Katherine Parr had been married to two elderly men, who had both died, leaving her a wealthy woman. She now hoped to marry for love and was courting the young, handsome, Thomas Seymour, when Henry's roving eye alighted on her and he decided she'd be his sixth wife.

What misfortune! She spent her years with him always looking over her shoulder in fear of her enemies and with the dread of losing her head like previous queens.

She seems, however, to have been a loving and attentive wife, to this, by now, very unappealing king. She comes over as one of his better queens and does a lot for his young daughters.

The book takes us beyond Henry's death to the end of Katherine's life. A sad, unfortunate woman.

I can now see why the Jean Plaidy books were so popular when they first came out, reminiscent of Philippa Gregory, half a century earlier.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sixth time lucky...., 22 May 2003
By A Customer
This book by Jean Plaidy shows the desparate situation of Katherine Parr, Henry VIII's sixth wife. Already forced in to two previous marriages with older men she is confrounted with the most dangerous yet. This book portrays the insecurity even noble women experienced in the Tudor period. It is a wonderful account of how Katherine manages to stay afloat in her turbulant marriage with the dying king, overshadowed by the executioners axe.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars TOO CLOSE FOR COMFORT..., 7 Sep 2003
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Jean Plaidy, also known as Victoria Holt to her legion of devoted fans, was a gifted and prolific writer of historical fiction. A masterful storyteller, Ms. Plaidy seamlessly interweaves historical facts into a rich tapestry of fiction that is often spellbinding. Here, she writes of Katherine Parr, a comely noblewoman, twice widowed, who would rise from obscurity reluctantly to become the sixth and, thankfully, last wife of that colorful Tudor despot, King Henry VIII of England.
At the time that Katherine Parr caught the King's eye, she was in love with the rakishly handsome and ambitious Thomas Seymour, brother to Jane Seymour, the third wife of King Henry VIII. Jane died shortly after producing the coveted living son, who would someday reign as King Edward VI. Thomas Seymour held a coveted place at court by virtue of his ties to the King. Once the King's eyes landed upon the hapless Katherine Parr, however, even Thomas Seymour had no choice but to withdraw his suit for her hand.
The King's eye and attentions, having settled upon Katherine Parr so soon after he had sent his fifth wife to the block to have her head severed from her neck, made Katherine uneasy. After all, Henry VIII's wives had met with unenviable fates. His first wife of many years, Katherine of Aragon, had been cast aside and driven to an early death. His second wife, Anne Boleyn, for whom he had discarded Katherine of Aragon, had been accused of having had numerous adulterous relationships while married to the King. For this she was found guilty of treason and was unceremoniously beheaded, whereupon he married plain Jane Seymour, who managed to give him a son before dying of complications after childbirth.
The fourth wife of Henry VIII was Anne of Cleves, whom the King found physically repugnant and not to his liking. She prudently and wisely agreed to a divorce rather than wait to have her head severed from the rest of her body. The fifth wife was Catherine Howard, a beautiful teenager who showed little judgment both before and after her marriage to Henry. Accused of adulterous behavior, she, too, was found guilty of treason, as had been Anne Boleyn, and beheaded. It was on the heels of this last execution that Henry's eyes fell upon the comely widow, Katherine Parr.
Katherine Parr, an intelligent, attractive woman, was known as Lady Latimer, when she caught the King's eye. It was to be an encounter from which there would be no escape. In love with Thomas Seymour, she married the King most reluctantly and consigned herself to a stressful number of years, living, at all times, under the sword of Damocles, mindful of the fate of her predecessors and hoping not to lose her head.
As Queen Katherine, she would become the target of those who wished England to return to traditional Catholicism, as she was interested in what was referred to as the new learning. It would be these new ideas that would eventually give rise to Protestantism in England. Her enemies lost no time in trying to have her share the same fate that had befallen some of Henry's other wives, as they plotted and schemed against her.
Queen Katherine's life would become a grim game of cat and mouse, as she tried to stay one step ahead of those who would wish her harm. Even Henry's affections would prove to be fickle, changing like the wind from day to day, causing her to fear that every day may be her last. Her daily existence was subject to the capricious and arbitrary moods of Henry VIII, a situation not conducive to peace and happiness.
This book is a treasure trove of historical facts that are melded into an enjoyable work of fiction, Even the most discerning reader should enjoy this richly drawn portrait of the court of Henry VIII and his sixth and, mercifully, last wife. Set amidst the political and religious turmoil of sixteenth century England, peppered with names of those who would have lasting historical impact, it is an entertaining, as well as informative, work of historical fiction.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good.., 2 July 2007
By 
This review is from: The Sixth Wife: (Tudor Saga) (Paperback)
This was a good book, but it was not the most thrilling I have ever read. Plaidys description of Katherine, I found to be good, and made her an easy person to emphasis with, if a little sterotypical. Katherine is portrayed as a generally calm, patient and kind woman, whom despite everything hangs on to her love for the dashing Thomas Seymore and treats the Kings children kindly. You feel for her as she fears for her head and life, and the characters do seem real. However it is lacking abit of the flare of books such as forever amber, the virgin queen and so on.

A good and easy read if you like the genre.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars TOO CLOSE FOR COMFORT..., 3 July 2003
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Jean Plaidy, also known as Victoria Holt to her legion of devoted fans, was a gifted and prolific writer of historical fiction. A masterful storyteller, Ms. Plaidy seamlessly interweaves historical facts into a rich tapestry of fiction that is often spellbinding. Here, she writes of Katherine Parr, a comely noblewoman, twice widowed, who would rise from obscurity reluctantly to become the sixth and, thankfully, last wife of that colorful Tudor despot, King Henry VIII of England.
At the time that Katherine Parr caught the King's eye, she was in love with the rakishly handsome and ambitious Thomas Seymour, brother to Jane Seymour, the third wife of King Henry VIII. Jane died shortly after producing the coveted living son, who would someday reign as King Edward VI. Thomas Seymour held a coveted place at court by virtue of his ties to the King. Once the King's eyes landed upon the hapless Katherine Parr, however, even Thomas Seymour had no choice but to withdraw his suit for her hand.
The King's eye and attentions, having settled upon Katherine Parr so soon after he had sent his fifth wife to the block to have her head severed from her neck, made Katherine uneasy. After all, Henry VIII's wives had met with unenviable fates. His first wife of many years, Katherine of Aragon, had been cast aside and driven to an early death. His second wife, Anne Boleyn, for whom he had discarded Katherine of Aragon, had been accused of having had numerous adulterous relationships while married to the King. For this she was found guilty of treason and was unceremoniously beheaded, whereupon he married plain Jane Seymour, who managed to give him a son before dying of complications after childbirth.
The fourth wife of Henry VIII was Anne of Cleves, whom the King found physically repugnant and not to his liking. She prudently and wisely agreed to a divorce rather than wait to have her head severed from the rest of her body. The fifth wife was Catherine Howard, a beautiful teenager who showed little judgment both before and after her marriage to Henry. Accused of adulterous behavior, she, too, was found guilty of treason, as had been Anne Boleyn, and beheaded. It was on the heels of this last execution that Henry's eyes fell upon the comely widow, Katherine Parr.
Katherine Parr, an intelligent, attractive woman, was known as Lady Latimer, when she caught the King's eye. It was to be an encounter from which there would be no escape. In love with Thomas Seymour, she married the King most reluctantly and consigned herself to a stressful number of years, living, at all times, under the sword of Damocles, mindful of the fate of her predecessors and hoping not to lose her head.
As Queen Katherine, she would become the target of those who wished England to return to traditional Catholicism, as she was interested in what was referred to as the new learning. It would be these new ideas that would eventually give rise to Protestantism in England. Her enemies lost no time in trying to have her share the same fate that had befallen some of Henry's other wives, as they plotted and schemed against her.
Queen Katherine's life would become a grim game of cat and mouse, as she tried to stay one step ahead of those who would wish her harm. Even Henry's affections would prove to be fickle, changing like the wind from day to day, causing her to fear that every day may be her last. Her daily existence was subject to the capricious and arbitrary moods of Henry VIII, a situation not conducive to peace and happiness.
This book is a treasure trove of historical facts that are melded into an enjoyable work of fiction, Even the most discerning reader should enjoy this richly drawn portrait of the court of Henry VIII and his sixth and, mercifully, last wife. Set amidst the political and religious turmoil of sixteenth century England, peppered with names of those who would have lasting historical impact, it is an entertaining, as well as informative, work of historical fiction.
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4.0 out of 5 stars TOO CLOSE FOR COMFORT..., 14 Dec 2004
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Jean Plaidy, also known as Victoria Holt to her legion of devoted fans, was a gifted and prolific writer of historical fiction. A masterful storyteller, Ms. Plaidy seamlessly interweaves historical facts into a rich tapestry of fiction that is often spellbinding. Here, she writes of Katherine Parr, a comely noblewoman, twice widowed, who would rise from obscurity reluctantly to become the sixth and, thankfully, last wife of that colorful Tudor despot, King Henry VIII of England.
At the time that Katherine Parr caught the King's eye, she was in love with the rakishly handsome and ambitious Thomas Seymour, brother to Jane Seymour, the third wife of King Henry VIII. Jane died shortly after producing the coveted living son, who would someday reign as King Edward VI. Thomas Seymour held a coveted place at court by virtue of his ties to the King. Once the King's eyes landed upon the hapless Katherine Parr, however, even Thomas Seymour had no choice but to withdraw his suit for her hand.
The King's eye and attentions, having settled upon Katherine Parr so soon after he had sent his fifth wife to the block to have her head severed from her neck, made Katherine uneasy. After all, Henry VIII's wives had met with unenviable fates. His first wife of many years, Katherine of Aragon, had been cast aside and driven to an early death. His second wife, Anne Boleyn, for whom he had discarded Katherine of Aragon, had been accused of having had numerous adulterous relationships while married to the King. For this she was found guilty of treason and was unceremoniously beheaded, whereupon he married plain Jane Seymour, who managed to give him a son before dying of complications after childbirth.
The fourth wife of Henry VIII was Anne of Cleves, whom the King found physically repugnant and not to his liking. She prudently and wisely agreed to a divorce rather than wait to have her head severed from the rest of her body. The fifth wife was Catherine Howard, a beautiful teenager who showed little judgment both before and after her marriage to Henry. Accused of adulterous behavior, she, too, was found guilty of treason, as had been Anne Boleyn, and beheaded. It was on the heels of this last execution that Henry's eyes fell upon the comely widow, Katherine Parr.
Katherine Parr, an intelligent, attractive woman, was known as Lady Latimer, when she caught the King's eye. It was to be an encounter from which there would be no escape. In love with Thomas Seymour, she married the King most reluctantly and consigned herself to a stressful number of years, living, at all times, under the sword of Damocles, mindful of the fate of her predecessors and hoping not to lose her head.
As Queen Katherine, she would become the target of those who wished England to return to traditional Catholicism, as she was interested in what was referred to as the new learning. It would be these new ideas that would eventually give rise to Protestantism in England. Her enemies lost no time in trying to have her share the same fate that had befallen some of Henry's other wives, as they plotted and schemed against her.
Queen Katherine's life would become a grim game of cat and mouse, as she tried to stay one step ahead of those who would wish her harm. Even Henry's affections would prove to be fickle, changing like the wind from day to day, causing her to fear that every day may be her last. Her daily existence was subject to the capricious and arbitrary moods of Henry VIII, a situation not conducive to peace and happiness.
This book is a treasure trove of historical facts that are melded into an enjoyable work of fiction, Even the most discerning reader should enjoy this richly drawn portrait of the court of Henry VIII and his sixth and, mercifully, last wife. Set amidst the political and religious turmoil of sixteenth century England, peppered with names of those who would have lasting historical impact, it is an entertaining, as well as informative, work of historical fiction.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars story of Katherine Parr, 9 Aug 2009
By 
Lindymck (Falkirk, Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Sixth Wife: (Tudor Saga) (Paperback)
who was the sixth wife of henry viii and who was now in his fifties was still obsessed with having sons. but his health was failing and katherine acted as his nurse which she used to her advantage and outlived him. but life after the king was no picnic as her beloved betrayed her and eventually died after having her first child. a rather tragic figure in tudor history
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The tale of Catherine Parr, 1 May 2011
By 
This review is from: The Sixth Wife: (Tudor Saga) (Paperback)
This absorbing and well crafted 1953 novel written by that great master of British historical fiction, will keep you interested until the end. It recounts the story of Henry VIII's sixth wife, Catherine Parr. After two marriages, Katherine Parr has met the man she believed herself to truly love only to be chosen by the cruel tyrant
Henry VIII as his sixth wife. Because of her strong Reformist Protestant beliefs, and her inability to provide Henry with his much desired son, she soon falls in the shadow of the axe, sharing the fate Anne Boleyn and Katherine Howard, two of Henry VIII's wife who had executed. she is saved by Henry's death only to marry the deceitful rake, Sir Thomas Seymour who betrays her by wooing the young Elizabeth
The novel also touches on the lives of others such as Catherine Parr's sister Anne Parr Herbert, her martyred friend and devout Protestant, Anne Askew, her stepdaughter Elizabeth, and her niece, Jane Grey.
Plaidy as always writes with a fine sense of detail, and a deep understanding of the human mind, as well as an almost meticulous grasp of English history. I finished this book in a single weekend
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5.0 out of 5 stars jean plaids, 8 July 2014
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Always a pleasure to read this authors work Anyone interested in history can't fail to enjoy anything she has written.
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5.0 out of 5 stars for the wife, 4 Dec 2013
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This review is from: The Sixth Wife: (Tudor Saga) (Paperback)
Dear Amazon bought for the wife she enjoys this type of book then she tells me all about what is going on saves me reading it
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The Sixth Wife: (Tudor Saga)
The Sixth Wife: (Tudor Saga) by Jean Plaidy (Paperback - 5 Oct 2006)
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