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99 Reviews
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3 star:
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fry will engage, shock and enthrall
If you are going to buy this wonderful book, I urge you to buy it in cassette form. It is a pleasure just to listen to Fry's voice and he is perfect at portraying such upper-middle class characters with feeling and humour. Star's Tennis Balls is a captivating tale of Ned, caught in an entangled web of misery as the result of a practical joke by the Machiavellian Ashley, a...
Published on 11 Nov. 2000

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I like my revenge sweet, not sour, thanks
The beginning of this book grabs the reader's attention; Fry is a witty and a talented writer and the opening to this novel drew me in. I enjoyed the book immensely until Ned left the asylum, and was rooting for him all the way - then suddenly, the tone of the book changed, and became much darker. Not necessarily a bad thing; but here, it doesn't work.
Somehow,...
Published on 6 Mar. 2002


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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it., 15 Sept. 2013
I have enjoyed all of Stephen's works of fiction (Making History, The Liar etc) but would probably say that this one tops the lot. The story is absolutely amazing, and does a lot to illustrate the characters pain, fear and emotions. It is a story of survival, heartache, friendship, jealousy, betrayal and revenge. The twists and turns in the plot are unbelievable and will have you dropping your jaw in shock and surprise. This is an ingeniously well written book and I would strongly recommend it to anyone who truly loves and appreciates fantastic fiction at it's best. This book will stay with me for many years, and has earned itself a permanent place in my heart.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fry gets dark, 30 Sept. 2000
By A Customer
Stephen Fry was supposed to have cheered up. This is his first not-very-humorous novel but it's an excellent thriller; a mixture of John Webster, John Mortimer and...well...Stephen Fry. The word games are mostly absent but his favourite prospero Donald Trefusis is back in the form of incarcerated genius Babe Fraser; just as fiendishly clever but this time blacker and more bitter. We've met Ned Maddestone before but this time The Liar's Hugo Cartwright transforms into the destructive anti-hero himself before our eyes. It's not Hippopotamus but great stuff all the same.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A modern day 'Count of Monte Cristo', 27 Nov. 2001
By 
Junior Chibber (Canterbury, Kent United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
The year is 1980 and at the age of 17 Ned Maddstone has everything, good looks, the love of a beautiful girl, a wanted harrovian education, a prosperous and bright future starting with an education and degree in Oxford and the complete love and support of his family in the form of his very proud father. When he meets three lads whose hatred for him is about the only thing they have in common, Ned's life is changed forever.
This is a modern day 'Count of Monte Cristo' written in the form of a brilliantly intensive and psychological saga and definitely rubs its shoulders with masterpieces such as 'Kane and Able'(Jeffrey Archer) and 'First Among Equals'.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Game,Set Match?, 27 Nov. 2013
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This review is from: The Stars' Tennis Balls (Paperback)
Read this for my book group. It is reasonably well written but you have to suspend reality as the plot and characters are a bit predictable. Not sure if you can transpose the plot of the Count of Monte Cristo to a modern setting. The finale came as a bit of an anti-climax.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent story that drags you in., 22 Feb. 2012
By 
Mrs Lynne Brawn (Rushden, Northants United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Stars' Tennis Balls (Paperback)
I loved this book, after the first few pages I couldn't put it down. I really wanted to know the outcome. I was concerned and cared about Ned but knew he would escape. Loved the revenge he saught. The ending was unexpected but sensible. Stephen Fry rules.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intense injustice paves the way for hugely gratifying plan of vengeance, 15 Oct. 2012
This review is from: The Stars' Tennis Balls (Paperback)
Oh how I loved this book. So intensely bittersweet. A plan of masterful vengeance which is metered out to the writhing, squirming wretches who so richly deserved such merciless premeditated cruelty. I lapped it up.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dancing monkeys, 3 Jan. 2013
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This review is from: The Stars' Tennis Balls (Paperback)
Great brilliant unbelievable cool qi iq Alan Davies Stephen fry great book hbhbhvgfcn j j vg s. whine s hub jw jan. igu
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fry Class, 11 Nov. 2004
A modern Shakespearian tragedy disguised beautifully as a contemporary take on a Dumasian classic.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Hello?!!!!!!!!!!???????, 29 Mar. 2001
By 
N. Connor "Polythene P" (Seattle) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I realised on page 66 that I was reading a poorly disguised re-write of Alexander Dumas 'Count of Monte Cristo'. Now I cannot read on, without kipping ahead and sighing in disappointment when I recognise each stolen detail. Save yourself the bother, and go buy the original (6 pounds, I just checked). If this book inspires a few people to go back and read Dumas' classic, then maybe it will have been worthwhile. I really like Stephen Fry, and listed him amongst the few funny writers I could think of...But he'll have to do better than this.
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3 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Catching, Cruel, Flat, 20 July 2004
By A Customer
This book is like eating processed food from the freezer section. It looks great, feels great but leaves you with a feeling of exhaustion and emptiness.
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The Stars' Tennis Balls
The Stars' Tennis Balls by Stephen Fry (Paperback - 5 Aug. 2004)
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