Customer Reviews


19 Reviews
5 star:
 (13)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The mummy walks
Sexy immortals with angst to spare are the cornerstones of Anne Rice's fiction. "The Mummy or Ramses the Damned" takes a different direction, mixing romance with horror and supernatural thrills. It has its flaws, but the raw energy of the book keeps it roaring up to the finale.

Lawrence Stratford uncovers the mummy of Ramses the Second, or...
Published on 31 Dec 2005 by E. A Solinas

versus
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Mummy
Don't be deterred by the corny title. Of all Rice's books I found this to be the most fascinating. True master of the pen, Rice actually makes you believe in the most unbelievable of characters. Who else would be brave enough to place Cleopatra in a 20th century Egypt and cunning enough weave it into such a glorious plot that you don't even bat an eyelid at her...
Published on 1 Aug 2002


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The mummy walks, 31 Dec 2005
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Mummy (Paperback)
Sexy immortals with angst to spare are the cornerstones of Anne Rice's fiction. "The Mummy or Ramses the Damned" takes a different direction, mixing romance with horror and supernatural thrills. It has its flaws, but the raw energy of the book keeps it roaring up to the finale.

Lawrence Stratford uncovers the mummy of Ramses the Second, or "Ramses the Damned." But before he can unravel the mysteries around the mummy, he's murdered by his amoral nephew Henry, and the mummy is shipped to England. Lawrence's daughter Julie takes possession both of the family fortune and the mummy -- only to have the mummy revive when exposed to sunlight, and try to kill the murderous Henry. He's Ramses, an Egyptian king who drank an elixir of eternal life taken from a Hittite priestess.

Long ago, he faked his own death and wandered the world, eventually returning to Egypt and becoming the mentor/lover of the legendary Cleopatra -- only to lose her first to Antony, then to death. At first, Ramses is thrilled by the early-twentieth-century England, and he and Julie start to fall in love. But on a trip to Egypt, he comes across the mummy of Cleopatra, and revives her with a vial of the elixir. Except that this Cleopatra is mad, murderous, torn by her old loves and hates -- and unkillable.

This is not your parents' "Mummy" story. Except for one mildly funny scene where Rameses first revives, there are no stumbling mummies covered in bandages. Instead we have a tortured immortal who wakes up into a new world, while still being rooted in the Egypt of three thousand years ago.

Rice's lush prose is well-suited to the splendor of early twentieth-century England, when Egyptology was the fad -- she has lots of fun with the lace, pearl buttons, and opera houses. Her most awkward points are when Rameses is marveling at/criticizing 1914 England. At the same time, she gives new twists to the tale of the mummy, such as having him romance Cleopatra.

Ramses gives a slightly new twist to the tormented, lonely immortal, by having his almost childlike response to things like faucets and shoes. Julie falls for him a bit too quickly (yes, he's gorgeous, but what else?), but a good love interest. The other characters -- the youth-craving Elliott, his clueless but sweet son Alex, and the money-hungry, evil Henry -- are all intriguing and fully explored. But Cleopatra is what makes the book -- she's seductive but mad, tormented but still loving. Dislike her, but Rice will make you pity her too.

"The Mummy or Ramses the Damned" gives new twists to the story of a mummy come to life. Rather than an undercooked horror novel, Rice gives a thrilling, chilling look at immortality, and how what you want is not what you get.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Mummy. Anne Rice at her best., 10 Nov 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The Mummy (Paperback)
This is a great book. Anne Rice in "The Mummy" I felt hit a real high and wrote what is undoubtedly my favourite book of hers. She spins a story here that brings together all of her familiar techniques at story telling; two stories in different time periods, development of separate characters and locations and then the collision of it all in the books climactic crescendo.
There is the usual central character familiar to Rice's novels, Ramses here, and how he is fashioned from Egyptian Pharaoh to immortal advisor of future rulers. Ramses early love for the Queen Cleopatra and then his dawning relationship with Julie Stratford the educated English lady help bring further depth to the story.
If you have an interest in Egyptology, mixed with a bit of mysticism, like me you will find Anne Rice's portrayal of Ramses world fascinating. Rice develops an elaborate and convincing web within which she places her main character clearly at the centre. Ramses views and ideologies help explain why he takes the actions he does and lead nicely into some interesting perspectives on the relatively more modern Edwardian period. His transition to immortal and the realisation that this is more of a curse than a gift is especially poignant.
I found this book to be faster paced than some of her others but none the worse for it and have always hoped that she would one day decide to write a sequel or similar novels (Servant of the Bones is probably her most similar in style to this). There is just the right mix of thriller, horror (relatively mild) and love to keep you spellbound throughout and a few twists that add extra intrigue. I would have no hesitation in recommending this apparently lesser known work of Anne Rice to all her fans and to others as a superb introduction to her style.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Mummy, 1 Aug 2002
By A Customer
Don't be deterred by the corny title. Of all Rice's books I found this to be the most fascinating. True master of the pen, Rice actually makes you believe in the most unbelievable of characters. Who else would be brave enough to place Cleopatra in a 20th century Egypt and cunning enough weave it into such a glorious plot that you don't even bat an eyelid at her appearance!! A great cliffhanger of an ending ...... to be continued! WHEN!!!! PLEASE!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!, 22 Dec 2003
By 
This book is the best Anne Rice book. After reading this story, none of her others have come close, and in truth I have given up on them.
This is an amazing tale, the characters are great, and I have read this book at least twice in the last few years. Each time, I can barely put it down when I have started it. The only drawback is that it concludes with a promise of a sequel, and the path is left wide open for this. I read on an Anne Rice website that no sequel will be written until after the book has been turned into a film and released, which is a huge disappointment if true.
The story is beautifully written and crafted, and the only uncomfortable moment in the entire story is when one of the female characters invites Ramses to 'Batter down her virgin door'. It is a cringeworthy moment for those who don't buy in to the level of fluffy romance needed to accept that line as something an adult woman would say, but the rest of the book is wonderful. If you have a long train or plane journey coming up anytime soon, this is an excellent book to take with you, the time will pass so quickly.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars half a story, 24 Jan 2002
By A Customer
The book develops well and kept my attention all the way to the clifhanger ending . . . I've been waiting for Rice to write the continuation of the story for a long time but it doesn't seem to be coming. Don't buy this unless you're willing to put up with the frustration of NO ENDING.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Captivating, Enthralling, Beautiful .... I could go on!, 21 May 2001
By A Customer
Yet another amazing piece of writing from the master of "immortality". Although a little slow for the first 200 pages or so, the book rose to a heart pounding (if predictable) climax.
Not as sensual as the later "Vampire" books but the atmosphere is stunning. As with her other works you find yourself wondering if the story isn't a little more fact than fiction and that maybe, just maybe, Ramses is still out there somewhere .... AN ABSOLUTE MUST FOR RICE FANS.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Mummy: Or Ramses the Damned, 26 Aug 2003
Of all the books I have read by this spookily fantastic author (all of them to date!)I truly belive I left my heart and soul within the pages. The book was so well written capturing the very essence of the world that exists only when Anne writes. I found the link between my own emotions and that of the characters very strong, you really begin to feel as if you are watching them with your own eyes. The most romantic, english/egyptian story ever and I am not giving anything away! Once you start with this book there is no putting it down (I was reading it even in the bath!)Magical.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The romance of Ancient Egypt, 10 Aug 2003
A simply mesmerising book. Forget the Egyptology for a moment and it is the traditional bodice ripper, it sweeps you along on its romantic ride and you will love every second. The scenes on board the ocean liner make you wish that you were there to witness this romance of the century.
Ramses bewilderment at all the technological advances made by man makes you see the world through a childs eyes once again and you really appreciate all we have now.
Free of some of Rice's more flowery prose it is an entirely beliveable book and reminds us of how in vogue Egyptology and its archaeologists really were at the turn of the 20th century.
Not so much of a horror book but a jolly good romp that grips you from page one.
Even if the horror genre normally leaves you cold or romances leave you wanting to kick the dog this book will really deliver the goods.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must Read!!!, 11 Jan 2007
By 
This review is from: The Mummy (Paperback)
I was quite sceptical about reading this book, as I think I had associated it with the film 'The Mummy' which I remembered to be tacky, althought the two are not linked.

I must say once I stared reading the book I was not dissapointed! After reading the first few pages in became difficult to put down. With a blend of Egyptian history, horror and love, the re awakening or Rammeses is never dull and you start to feel real emotion for his character it definately keeps you hooked until the end.

A must read for everyone even in for you are not an Anne Rice fan.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Doomed to be chosen, deemed to be lost, 30 Mar 2008
By 
This review is from: The Mummy (Paperback)
A novel of love, not horror. A novel of supernatural marvel, not of fantastic gore. Anne Rice is best in her literature when she tells a love story. Here she is able to have a three or four layer love story. Deep in the past the love story is that of Ramses and Cleopatra as opposed to Antony and Cleopatra. The former should be a love story of eternal wisdom true in all times and that no one can evade, the latter a love story of mortal passion that leads to death and dies. The former becomes a passion of hatred, hateful (full of hate) love, of hate-oriented love. The latter becomes a love affair of undying passion because mortal, of undying passion because doomed. The next layers are the successive love affairs in the main two families, the Rutherfords and the Stratfords, two families that know how to cross difficulties, the rivers of life, as their names indicate. Elliott and Lawrence a long time ago. Elliott and Henry twenty years later. Alex and Julie in the present time. The genius of that is to resuscitate both Ramses and Cleopatra in those families in the 20th century. They invade this world with their old hatreds and love-affairs and invest a new layer of love affairs in this modern world. Cleopatra is the archetype of the victim of society and of history, but also of her capricious childish being that chooses to love the only man she mustn't choose, the one who is only going to be defeated by society and she will then suffer the insufferable dilemma between love and life, love and death, death and life. Ramses brings into this picture the possibility to be eternal, the detention of a power that is greater than all that mankind can imagine, the power to survive one's own mistakes and to survive in spite of one's own shortcomings, hence the necessity to become perfect in spite of the impossibility to even dream of that concept. Project such love and such power into human frail society and even frailer individuals and you have a cocktail that can only lead to a catastrophe, and it does. Then Anne Rice becomes the genius we expect her to be and she turns that human catastrophe, that human tragedy into a violent confrontation of simple material forces like a car versus a train, or the addiction to gambling and the hunger for winning in order to lose in order to re-experience the pleasure of winning leading to the exquisite pain of losing again. This absolutely masochistic dimension of human nature goes beyond human understanding and Anne Rice is the best author to express this lack of intelligibility in the intelligence of human beings. It is then a beautiful novel that deserves our attention and that should make us aware of the absolute folly of trying to go beyond our limits. Altogether Anne Rice produces a deep feeling of satisfaction with our own fate, our own lot in life. The end is surprising though because she unevenly distributes the honor of being regenerated and then we wonder why one person is left out and why the chosen two are taken out of the tragedy they deserved entirely to suffer and experience. Isn't that pure cruelty from Anne Rice, pure cruelty and undeserved advantage. Or is there another deeper pattern? Out of the three men who had had some homosexual contacts, two are killed and one is chosen. The only man in that group of four English men who had had no homosexual contact nor desire is left alive but un-chosen. It sure closes the novel on a feeling of unfairness.

Dr Jacques COULARDEAU, University Paris Dauphine, University Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne & University Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Mummy
The Mummy by Anne Rice (Paperback - 4 Nov 2004)
£7.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews