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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I read in greek and liked it a lot
I read this book in greek and liked it a lot. As an Athenian and living abroad, I must say this book smells of Athens!

The writing style and the character of Haritos are exactly like Athens and its inhabitants are today. It was a very nice thing to have a police mystery book as well as one that describes athenian reality. I have not read the english translation...
Published on 13 July 2006 by Anna

versus
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Caveat emptor
Readers should be aware, as I was not, that The Late-Night News and Deadline in Athens are one and the same book. I think one is a European edition and the other American. It doesn't help when Amazon puts them together as a double book deal.
Published on 15 Aug. 2007 by Mr. J. Allen


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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Caveat emptor, 15 Aug. 2007
By 
Mr. J. Allen - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Late-Night News (Paperback)
Readers should be aware, as I was not, that The Late-Night News and Deadline in Athens are one and the same book. I think one is a European edition and the other American. It doesn't help when Amazon puts them together as a double book deal.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I read in greek and liked it a lot, 13 July 2006
This review is from: The Late-Night News (Paperback)
I read this book in greek and liked it a lot. As an Athenian and living abroad, I must say this book smells of Athens!

The writing style and the character of Haritos are exactly like Athens and its inhabitants are today. It was a very nice thing to have a police mystery book as well as one that describes athenian reality. I have not read the english translation but I bet it will not have the same effect. In my opinion it is very difficult for an outsider to identify with such a greek character and for people who know Greece only as the land of sun, sea and antiquity, the everyday life of Athens, with dirt, strange weather, traffic jams might be a dissapointment. However, it is a faithfull depiction. The humor also is quite particular in some points and it takes an extremely perceptive translator to covey this in another language. Haritos is very convincing as a 50-60 year old greek man. I cannot say much about his policeman side but it binds well with what people face up to at work everyday.

I recommend it at least to the greek audience or to those who have lived for a little while in Athens.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Beware buyer - different titles, same novel, 2 Dec. 2009
This review is from: The Late-Night News (Paperback)
Deadline in Athens (Inspector Costas Haritos Mysteries)I know someone has already said 'caveat emptor' but I'm repeating it. I was livid having settled down to enjoy what i thought would be my second Haritos police procedural to find that Late Night News and Deadline in Athens are the same novel with different titles. Having bought both and taken them with me as my sole holiday reading I felt cheated and I'd like my money back and I regard it as remiss of Amazon and indeed the publisher to give publicity to both these books with no warning to the customer that they are the same book.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slow-Paced Greek Police Procedural, 2 Oct. 2004
By 
A. Ross (Washington, DC) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Late-night News (Paperback)
I'm a huge fan of crime novels from the other countries, so it was with great eagerness that I picked up this first book of a Greek trilogy featuring Costas Haritos, a middle-aged homicide detective. Set in Athens around 1993, the story features an incredibly complicated mystery which kicks off with the apparently motiveless murder of a young Albanian couple. There's a lot of material jammed into the plot, which touches upon the omnipresence of Albanians in Greece, the role of the investigative media, a bundle of mysterious letters, a trio of secret love affairs, a child-smuggling plot which may or may not tie into the murders, the legacy of the fascist era, a pedophile recently released from jail, the dissolution of the Soviet Bloc, and the ability of the powerful to protect one another.
Throughout the book, Inspector Haritos is constantly being called into his superior's office in order to grovel to one bigwig after another. He's a likable character precisely because he's not very good at playing people off each other, instead he's a more traditional cranky copper with a taste for unhealthy food and a secret informant. What little glimpses are given into his personal life aren't too pleasant. He lives with his TV-addicted wife, endures her whining requests for spending money and her fake orgasms, wishing for nothing more than a little peace and quiet to retreat into dictionaries (every fictional detective has to have a little quirk). His investigation proceeds through all the usual pitfalls and wrong turns before arriving at a shocker of an ending.
As a window into Greece, it has to be said that the book doesn't offer much of a new perspective. Athens is a glum and rainy place, and the traffic is horrendous (anytime Haritos goes anywhere, his exact route is tiresomely detailed and we are told how long it takes). Greek marriage is an unfulfilling, occasionally nasty enterprise sprinkled with unexpected tender moments, and the child is the main source of joy. The Greeks hate Albanians. Powerful media moguls and industrialists act swiftly and with cunning to insulate themselves from any imputation of wrongdoing (as it is everywhere). The media is a dog-eat-dog world (as it is everywhere). There are little glimpses here and there of how the fascist and communist struggles of the postwar era still resonate, but just a taste. On the whole, it's worth reading if one has a particular interest in Greece or international mysteries, but others will probably find it too convoluted and plodding for their tastes.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Deftly plotted detective novel, 21 April 2011
By 
Mondoro (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Late-Night News (Paperback)
Inspector Haritos is a late entry into the now well-stocked gallery of detectives, at odds with their superiors and with less than comfortable home lives. The book is based in an Athens in winter, quite different from the one most tourists know, but still virtually paralysed by traffic. Those familiar with its street patterns will take some delight (and sympathy) in following him round the city as he fumes at the delays in his elderly Mirafiori.

Based in the early 1990s, it presents an unsparing picture of the problems assailing the new Greek democracy, with a background story of child trafficking from Albania helped by corrupt officials on the frontier. But the foreground is occupied by an investigation into the murder of a TV journalist just before she is going to release what might be a very damaging scoop. The Inspector's enquiries take him down many alleys, most of them blind, and lead him into several confrontations with his superior, the repulsively smooth Ghikas and the Minister, which need a combination of skill and lucky breaks for him to survive. The final solution is breathtaking, but explains one or two strange events that the reader might have picked up on and wondered about earlier.

This is the first of a series that has been recently translated from the original Greek by David Connolly, who has produced a very readable text. It will appeal to those who enjoy the traditional whodunit, and shares a world similar to Inspector Zen's (Michael Dibdin). Highly recommended.

PS For those who find Greek names confusing, the list of Dramatis Personae at the front make a useful reference.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great translation, 27 Mar. 2013
By 
A. Mcveigh - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Late-Night News (Paperback)
This is a great book and the translation has been really very helpful to my student and I since we started reading both versions together.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A triumph, Markaris is a voice we all of Europe (& the UK) need to hear., 11 Feb. 2014
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This review is from: The Late-Night News (Paperback)
A laid back and cool look at how career, social standing, financial and political power and self interest trumps justice. Inspector Haritos is no genius, and life at home is trying for him, but he is an example to us all, and very heartening.
Markaris deserves a huge, international audience for his exploration of endemic political and financial perversion of truth and justice. Terrific English translation.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great Greek Detective Novel, 5 Oct. 2014
By 
Stephen Folan (Middlesex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Late-Night News (Paperback)
I wanted a detective novel that would explain how Greece worked. This is a good one and gives you a feeling for the bureaucracy and power in Greek Society. The ending is unexpected but is within the tone of the whole book where you know as much as anybody else. It can be heavy going as the subject matter is thought provoking but a worthwhile read if you fancy something better than serial killers.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Beware, 12 Sept. 2012
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This review is from: The Late-Night News (Paperback)
Beware - this book is the same as "Deadline in Athens" which I enjoyed but I don't think I want to read book again book under the title of "The Late Night news" or is it a "spot the difference" competition?
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4.0 out of 5 stars PLEASE HEED WARNING - ALSO PUBLISHED AS DEADLINE IN ATHENS, 30 Dec. 2013
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This review is from: The Late-Night News (Paperback)
Please do heed the warning above, else like me & some other reviewers, you will end up with two copies of the same book.

For my book review (of sorts) see Deadline in Athens.
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