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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant historical re-construction of Caesar's early political life
The 4th of McCullough's magisterial 'Master of Rome' series, this for me is the best. She reconstructs Caesar's early career from his return from Spain after the death of his first wife, till he leaves for Gaul. Because this is an era which is both little known and yet relatively well-documented, McCullough does an excellent job of sticking to the sources without ever...
Published on 17 Nov 2006 by Roman Clodia

versus
4 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars no thanks!
The novel is OK, and I have to give credit where it is due for the wonderful research. It is also written very well. Yet McCullough's depiction of the characters was just so incredibly irritating! Caesar is perfection personnified, which I can just about swallow given that he was a remarkable unparalleled character. But what on earth was his mother Aurelia supposed to be...
Published on 29 Oct 2002


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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant historical re-construction of Caesar's early political life, 17 Nov 2006
By 
Roman Clodia (London) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Caesar's Women (Masters of Rome) (Paperback)
The 4th of McCullough's magisterial 'Master of Rome' series, this for me is the best. She reconstructs Caesar's early career from his return from Spain after the death of his first wife, till he leaves for Gaul. Because this is an era which is both little known and yet relatively well-documented, McCullough does an excellent job of sticking to the sources without ever sacrificing imagination and drama. Here she gets to grips now just with life in the Senate amongst the men, but also in the houses of Rome amongst the women: Caesar's formidable mother Aurelia, his lovely and adoring daughter Julia and his spiteful mistress Servilia.

Detailed, fascinating, slightly romaticised and yet compelling this is completely unputdownable.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars superb history lesson, 3 Feb 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Caesar's Women (Paperback)
You shouldn't miss one of these books, magnificen
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very compelling read., 13 Dec 2013
This review is from: Caesar's Women (Masters of Rome) (Paperback)
In this the fourth novel in the Masters of Rome series Colleen McCullough gives a thoroughly enthralling account, on the early years, of the tumultuous rise to power of the greatest Roman of them all, Julius Caesar. I do not like giving away spoilers so I will be brief. Albeit somewhat biographical in its telling, it is still a great page turner. The narrative is rich in historical fact, interwoven with love, intrigue, and three dimensional characterisation.
For those who would like further information on this epoch I highly recommend the OSPREY Campaign, Warrior, and men at arms booklets, with great overviews, excellent illustrations, and highly detailed maps.

The perfect companion to the Master of Rome seies is the ROMA VICTRIX wine beakerCalix Imperium, Roma Victrix Pewter wine beaker
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Roman Saga Continues, 8 Nov 2007
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Caesar's Women (Hardcover)
Colleen McCullough was born in Australia. A neurophysicist, she established the department of neurophysiology at the Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney She then worked as a researcher and teacher at Yale Medical School for ten years. She is the author of the record-breaking international bestseller The Thorn Birds and her series of books on Rome have also been bestsellers. Colleen lives on Norfolk Island in the Pacific with her husband.

The three previous novels in Colleen McCullough's hugely successful series set either in Rome itself or dealing with the lives of its citizens, primarily Gaius Marius, Lucius Cornelius Sulla and the self-styled Pompey the Great have all been leading up to the brightest star ascending in the skies of Rome, Julius Caesar.

This is his story and the story of the Republic of Rome, where he was both adored, feared, hated and probably most of all resented. A man who was undoubtedly the greatest Roman who ever lived. A man who could truly be called great, but a man who had flaws in his make up. A man who was honest, who rewarded loyalty by giving it twice over in return, but a man who had a dreadful temper a love of women, but almost always choosing the wrong ones and although he tried to disguise it from everyone, a man who suffered from the `falling' sickness and was terrified that his enemies would find out and use it against him.

This is his story and the story of the people who fought tooth and nail to destroy him and all he stood for. No longer the young man who had sworn that he would find and destroy the pirates who had captured him in his youth. In accomplishing this task he had put his foot on the first rung of the ladder towards political greatness. Now he is becoming on the great leaders of Rome, commanding both the love and respect of the people of Rome and more importantly the might of the legions.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Saga that is Rome Continues, 1 Nov 2007
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Caesar's Women (Paperback)
Colleen McCullough was born in Australia. A neurophysicist, she established the department of neurophysiology at the Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney She then worked as a researcher and teacher at Yale Medical School for ten years. She is the author of the record-breaking international bestseller The Thorn Birds and her series of books on Rome have also been bestsellers. Colleen lives on Norfolk Island in the Pacific with her husband.

The three previous novels in Colleen McCullough's hugely successful series set either in Rome itself or dealing with the lives of its citizens, primarily Gaius Marius, Lucius Cornelius Sulla and the self-styled Pompey the Great have all been leading up to the brightest star ascending in the skies of Rome, Julius Caesar.

This is his story and the story of the Republic of Rome, where he was both adored, feared, hated and probably most of all resented. A man who was undoubtedly the greatest Roman who ever lived. A man who could truly be called great, but a man who had flaws in his make up. A man who was honest, who rewarded loyalty by giving it twice over in return, but a man who had a dreadful temper a love of women, but almost always choosing the wrong ones and although he tried to disguise it from everyone, a man who suffered from the `falling' sickness and was terrified that his enemies would find out and use it against him.

This is his story and the story of the people who fought tooth and nail to destroy him and all he stood for.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yet another thorough and interesting book, 16 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Caesar's Women (Paperback)
Colleen McCullough has yet again produced an interesting and thorough historical novel. It is now the 5th book I read from this author and I've never been dissappointed. Ceasar's Women is on the same level as The Grass Crown and The First Man of Rome.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spellbinding Roman historical fiction, 25 Jan 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Caesar's Women (Paperback)
Colleen McCullough has written yet another historical masterpiece from the Roman Republican Era. This time she shows us the important women in Caesars life, from his mother Aurelia to his daughter Julia. The story takes us back in time by thorough descriptions of the Roman way of life from the Forum to the Suburra. I also recommend (to be read first) her previous books The Grass Crown (and two more I don't remember the titles of right now)
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great!, 14 Aug 2003
By 
Jo (London, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Caesar's Women (Paperback)
Yet another first-class read. Ignore the the two-star review above - this book is the equal of the other three in terms of excitement and excellent characterisation, even if the focus has narrowed somewhat from the sweeping civil and foreign wars of the first three books. Gaius Julius's rise from obscure Subura resident, albeit the scion of an ancient and honourable family, all the way up the cursus honorum to the position of consul is fascinating and compelling, with all the intrigue, love, tragedy, brilliance and politicking one could ever ask for. An intricate portait of a unique man in a unique time. Unputdownable.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars yet another success: wonderful!, 30 Aug 2011
By 
rob crawford "Rob Crawford" (Balmette Talloires, France) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Caesar's Women (Masters of Rome) (Paperback)
THis is the episode of Caesar's career that he spent mostly intriguing in Rome: it is about how politics were run then, who the personalities were, and all the ways in which he enjoyed and used women. It is a matter of taste, but I enjoyed it as much as the earlier volumes. While the author goes a bit too much in the everyday detail at times, this is an absolutely superb place to learn about ancient Rome in the twilight of the Republic.

Caesar is the sun around which all the characters orbit as he takes the reigns of power into his hands to do things that no one imagined possible. It is a portrait of genius, at times a bit too superhuman, but then he is unequalled in so many ways by anyone in the modern world. He has not yet made his greatest military conquests, but is positioning himself, which is a political struggle against a bizarre spectrum of natural enemies.

The portrait of roman society also gains wonderful detail, in particular the role of religion in everyday affairs. Caesar becomes a priest, but as a source of power and as a way to stabilize his finances, which are perpetually in disarray. There are some hilarious episodes with the Vestal Virgins, forced circumcisions, and arcane battle between members of aristocratic families. Also, McCulough does not shy from giving an iconoclastic interpretation of Cicero as a vacillating and cowardly prig, however brilliant his self-aggrandising writings were; he in many ways is the most interesting character of this volume.

Warmly recommended as among the best historical novels you can find and certainly one of the most distinguished series ever written about Rome. McCullogh has again done her homework and you can tell it is a work of love.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another great instalment, 18 Aug 2013
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This review is from: Caesar's Women (Masters of Rome) (Paperback)
This book is the fourth in the masters of rome series and it is about the lives of the so called masters of rome- caesar, pompey and the senate. This book also gives further insight into how the women of rome lived- hence the name. Although the author does still tend to elaborate on how perfect caesar is, the love and detail that went into this novel is obvious to see. This book also chronicles the birth of gaius octavius, later augustus first emperor of rome and as he is my favourite roman i cant wait to see how he develops in the next 3 books. You can start from this book and dont have to read the previous, however i think it better to read the others as it will give you a deeper understanding of republican rome.
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Caesar's Women (Masters of Rome)
Caesar's Women (Masters of Rome) by Colleen McCullough Doctor of Neurophysiology (Paperback - 7 Aug 2003)
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