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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Monumental egos and moral emptiness among the privileged classes
When I was young the mantra of the resource-poor when talking about those more financially endowed was always `they have more money than sense'. That is certainly the case in Huxley's cynical sneer at the manners and mores of the upper-classes and intellectuals of the 1920s, of which he was one of course. Sacrificing plot for content and detailed character development,...
Published on 3 May 2008 by Trevor Coote

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointed
I wanted to like this well acclaimed book but after the first chapter, which I liked very much, I thought it far too 'busy' with people all clamoring for attention at once. The content is woefully out-moded, dismal really, maybe reflecting the zeitgeist, the spirit of the times, the early twentieth century.
Published 7 months ago by Jane Brooke


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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Monumental egos and moral emptiness among the privileged classes, 3 May 2008
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Trevor Coote "Trevor Coote" (Tahiti, French Polynesia) - See all my reviews
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When I was young the mantra of the resource-poor when talking about those more financially endowed was always `they have more money than sense'. That is certainly the case in Huxley's cynical sneer at the manners and mores of the upper-classes and intellectuals of the 1920s, of which he was one of course. Sacrificing plot for content and detailed character development, Point Counter Point is a complexly woven, satirical take on what was effectively England's `Jazz Age' where monumental egos and moral emptiness reign among the privileged classes. The Tantamount family, rich since the dissolution of the monasteries, throw regular parties for the intellectuals and dilettantes of the day, and indeed the atmosphere is rather like being led around and being invited to listen in to the conversations en route. However, much of the book revolves around an elaborate series of relationships and affairs. Among others, Lady Edward Tantamount is having an affair with the painter and womaniser John Bidlake, and man-eating Lucy Tantamount is pursued by Bidlake's son Walter. Walter is living with pregnant Marjorie Carling, who has left her family to be with him and who realises that she is already `old hat'. In the meantime, his sister Elinor is returning from India with her husband Philip Quarles, locked in a marriage that has lost all passion and meaning. The intellectuals are represented chiefly by Mark Rampion and Maurice Spandrell, men of wildly differing characters. The happily married Rampion is one of the few people in the book with a shred of integrity whereas Spandrell is an odious, pompous debaucher of young women. The pain of each unlikeable character is built upon brick by brick and it is difficult to feel sympathy for any of them, even when tragedy occurs, their self-induced agonies resulting from grasping selfishness and duplicity. Sexual shenanigans aside, Point Counter Point is at heart a book of ideas with the characters acting as mouthpieces for some fierce polemic on politics and religion, art, music and literature, physics and biology, sex and morality. Huxley betrays his own particular concern about the effects of industrialisation and rapid technological progress, overuse of the world's resources, and his fear of creeping Americanisation. Great writing, but a perhaps a little heavy going for much of today's readership.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious and quite relevant, 23 May 2009
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K. Bourouba (Edinburgh) - See all my reviews
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I found this book to be very humorous. The interaction between the characters is a work of genius.

One thing that could put people off readng this is the fact it is set in the 1920's. Dont let that put you off - the story itself is very relevant in this day and age and goes to show that some of the things taking place in our society now are not new.

The political message is very well balanced and in our high speed world, it may serve to give people reason to pause for thought.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Loved this classical., 7 April 2014
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I really like it and I found it very useful for my personal interests in arts and literature. It comes as it is described, so very satisfactory.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointed, 5 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Point Counter Point (Vintage Classics) (Paperback)
I wanted to like this well acclaimed book but after the first chapter, which I liked very much, I thought it far too 'busy' with people all clamoring for attention at once. The content is woefully out-moded, dismal really, maybe reflecting the zeitgeist, the spirit of the times, the early twentieth century.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good but dated, 28 Oct 2013
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Loved it first time time round decades ago but novel now seems dated and class ssumptions boring and predictable blah
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars good for some , but not me, 12 April 2013
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This review is from: Point Counter Point (Vintage Classics) (Paperback)
it's just not what I'm used to reading with Huxley , went on n on a lot , personally i was disappointed and unfortunatly rather boring
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Point Counter Point (Vintage Classics)
Point Counter Point (Vintage Classics) by Aldous Huxley (Paperback - 1 July 2004)
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