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47 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Robert Redford
Following the very successful film Out of Africa there have been several biographies of the principal real-life characters, Karen Blixen and Denys Finch Hatton and their times - roughly the first three decades of the 20th C. Sara Wheeler has undertaken an enormous amount of diligent research to bring us Too Close to the Sun, the most comprehensive biography I have seen of...
Published on 9 Oct 2009 by Brian Singleton

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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not quite famous
This is a cleverly written book about someone who did little and achieved less but was by all accounts a great charmer. His main claim to fame, posthumously, was through Karen Blixen's memoir Out of Africa. With so little information on Denys Finch Hatton's (DFH) life and indeed little to write about - the main themes are endless trips back and forth from England to Kenya...
Published on 2 Mar 2008 by H. Rogers


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47 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Robert Redford, 9 Oct 2009
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This review is from: Too Close To The Sun: The Life and Times of Denys Finch Hatton (Paperback)
Following the very successful film Out of Africa there have been several biographies of the principal real-life characters, Karen Blixen and Denys Finch Hatton and their times - roughly the first three decades of the 20th C. Sara Wheeler has undertaken an enormous amount of diligent research to bring us Too Close to the Sun, the most comprehensive biography I have seen of the latter, an English aristocrat to whom Karen Blixen gave herself, body and soul, in what seems to have been a largely unrequited relationship. Karen was undoubtedly a snob and even her concern for the Africans on her lands, the only redeeming feature tempering that defect, could be seen as treating Africans more as children or pets than fellow human beings. However, she was honest and straightforward and the genius that some thought worthy of a Nobel Prize for Literature was not far from the surface during her relationship with Finch Hatton. What Karen Blixen realised too late was that Finch Hatton had little concern for anybody but himself. Sara Wheeler's beautifully written dispassionate biography makes his inherent selfishness all too clear and for this reader gave her account of his life a mesmeric fascination. Finch Hatton was a man of his class and his time; a member of the English aristocracy (far removed from Robert Redford's anti-Brit American adventurer) and committed to King and Country and Class above all else. His upbringing as the younger son unlikely to succeed to the family title may well have formed his character. There is much in his life we can admire, a certain grittiness about getting on with what has to be done, courage in war and in the wilderness and the usual manly virtues. He formed enduring friendships within his class, which eased his passage through society wherever he found himself; he was admired by men and adored by women. Sara Wheeler tells it all, glosses over nothing and makes her biography of Denys Finch Hatton essential reading for any student of his times and the great social changes that have ensured those days are gone forever. Strongly recommended.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another Perspective., 31 Mar 2014
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This book would seem to be a carefully researched perspective on one of Kenya's early pioneers; another side of a multifaceted relationship that was bought to the public by Isak Dinesen, a pen name used by the Danish author Baroness Karen von Blixen-Finecke, in her now famous Out of Africa, a memoir of her life in Kenya.

Perhaps a more accurate and dispassionate portrayal of the man she undoubtably loved, and her life in the turbulent difficult and exciting times of Kenya's early pioneers, it rIngs true to a third generation ex bush pilot who was familiar with the areas, clubs, family's and skies of that wild and beautiful country.

My grandparents and parents moved and mingled with many of the characters mentioned. I live a few miles from that house at the coast, flew the routes taken by the principle chapters who were living history, and lived as a boy not far from that coffe farm that consumed so much of her life.

I found it moving, fascinating and wholly believable. It is a beautifully written most enjoyable account of the life and times of my grandparents generation. I can highly recommend it.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Bounder and a Hero, 14 Feb 2012
By 
Mr. R. D. M. Kirby "Dick Kirby" (Suffolk, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Too Close To The Sun: The Life and Times of Denys Finch Hatton (Paperback)
Denys Finch Hatton was a charmer, one of East Africa's greatest big-game hunters, a traveller and an adventurer but he was perceived by some to possess many different personalities. Others would have described him as being a bounder and a cad, one who was much loved by women but found it difficult to return their love; and often, he really didn't try. Finch Hatton was brave - when a crocodile seized him by his leg, he extricated himself from this undeniably tricky situation by poking his finger in its eye. He was awarded a Military Cross during the First World War but perhaps his most daring escapade was becoming involved with Karen Blixen, whose errant husband had thoughtfully infected her with a dose of Cupid's Measles. It appears that Finch Hatton was not himself infected with syphilis and given the number of women he bedded during his association with the neurotic Baroness Blixen, it was just as well.

But all this begs the question - would Finch Hatton have become as well-known as he has, had it not been for the combined efforts of Karen Blixen, the more hirsute Robert Redford - and of course, the author of this compelling book, Sara Wheeler? Probably not.

So it says a great deal for Ms. Wheeler's literary skills that she's produced a first-class book, one tremendously well-written, full of sly humour and painstakingly researched; she says it took her three years and that, I can well imagine. Sara Wheeler has convincingly brought all of the characters to life. Karen Blixen is portrayed as a loyal friend, talented, obstinate and histrionic who was used as a convenient bed-fellow for Finch Hatton, between safaris; Beryl Markham as scheming, self-serving, promiscuous and, I think, quite unpleasant. And poor, doomed Berkeley Cole, with (as he told his brother) his `rotten heart', dying at the early age of forty-three.

I was sorry when this brilliant book came to an abrupt end, with Finch Hatton dying - at almost exactly the same age as his friend, Berkeley Cole - when his aeroplane crashed and burst into flames. If the lions really came and lay on his grave in the Ngong Hills, as it's alleged they did, he was in good company.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written book, 24 Dec 2012
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Good to read more about Denys than appeared in the film and book 'Out of Africa'. So much more to understand and
admire and a good insight into the times.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not quite famous, 2 Mar 2008
By 
H. Rogers - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Too Close To The Sun: The Life and Times of Denys Finch Hatton (Paperback)
This is a cleverly written book about someone who did little and achieved less but was by all accounts a great charmer. His main claim to fame, posthumously, was through Karen Blixen's memoir Out of Africa. With so little information on Denys Finch Hatton's (DFH) life and indeed little to write about - the main themes are endless trips back and forth from England to Kenya and failed business ventures - the author wisely gives the book the sub title, The life and Times of DFH. This enables her to pad the book out with describtions of events in England and Kenya during DFH's lifetime. This is the saving of the book as the author is both witty and has an eye for the absurd. However, at times she falls into the trap of adopting the same writing style as her subjects with many archaic phrases and describtions. The biggest drawback of the book, however, is the subject himself. DFH's life appears little different from the hundreds of wealthy englishmen who went out to Kenya in the early part of the last century, even his romance with Blixen has the air of a relationship of convenience - certainly not the great romance that Blixen made it out to be. The book therefore comes accross more as a gentle stroll through Kenya/English society in the 20s and 30s rather than a biography of someone who probably doesn't merit one.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 29 Jan 2009
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warthog (Wales /England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Too Close To The Sun: The Life and Times of Denys Finch Hatton (Paperback)
I agree with the negative reviewer: "Disappointing Slapdash". Apart from a few good photographs I have not seen of Finch Hatton before, there was little in this book that made me think it was more informative about the character than what I had read previously by Errol Trzebinski. I was disappointed as I felt she had a good opportunity to really research the character of Finch Hatton. Some of the descriptions of Kenya I felt were "flowery" and again I refer back to Trzebinski who obviously had a deep love and understanding of the country and knew how to bring it to life with minimum yet effective phraseology. For me there were too many unaswered questions about Finch Hatton which I feel a good biography should address She doesn't really make clear why she did not like Karen Blixen initially and that makes me wonder if she researched the character thouroughly enough. There is so much to know about this fascinating woman
and yet I feel Sarah Wheeler did not give a balanced account of the relationship between Finch Hatton and Blixen. After all if the relationship had not existed would there have been a need for a biography about him at all?
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars finch hatton, an icon, 4 Aug 2009
By 
M. Bradshaw (lancashire,uk) - See all my reviews
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superbly detailed book that describes a real life character warts and all from a time when Britain produced men and women that broke the mould and shaped the world as we know it for better and worse. The description in intimate detail of a time treasured and ejoyed by the privileged but deserving few serves only to demonstrate how far we have fallen as a society in our aspirations and dreams. In a society that condemns the different and despises success or enjoyment for its own sake, this book is a refreshing oasis in the poisonous desert that modern day totalitarian levellers would have us live. Read the book and understand how life should be lived.
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26 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Into Africa, 13 Mar 2006
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Anyone who saw the movie Out of Africa has to read this book - to read the true story behind the Robert Redford character. In real life - Sara Wheeler reveals - Denys Finch Hatton was 'bald as a billiard ball'! He was the second son of an earl who took off for East Africa - 'still then the land of the pioneer' - the archetypal eternal wanderer. He is just as romantic as Redford, according to this spellbinding portrait by Sara Wheeler, but more complex - he was a committed reader, a fine musician and a lover of Chateau d'Yquem wine. His love affair with the writer Karen Blixen comes alive in the bush as Wheeler recreates their safaris. She also describes an epic 6-month trip to Somalia, in which Finch Hatton bought a herd of bony cattle and drove them down to Nairobi. Tragedy, comedy, love and war - what more can you ask of a biography? Brilliant.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good author picks poor subject in Beautiful location., 26 July 2014
I guess that, like most people, my interest in reading Too Close To The Sun came from seeing the movie version of "Out of Africa", and a desire to know more about the characters and places depicted. The truth behind the Hollywood gloss. Like previous reviewers I found the style a little to saccharined but maybe it was necessary to try to add value and worth to the vacuous, self indulgent life of Denys Finch Hatton. All charm and no substance, Hatton that is.
Sara Wheeler has gone to great lengths to research and bring to the reader the life of yet another spoilt aristocrat who didn't know how lucky he was or appreciate the world in which he lived. At least the author comes out of the experience with her integrity intact.
I hope Sara Wheeler selects a more worthy subject for her next project. Her hard work and talent deserve better.
As for Hatton, go with the Robert Redford version, he's likeable and has more depth of character!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Too close to the Sun, 18 May 2013
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This review is from: Too Close To The Sun: The Life and Times of Denys Finch Hatton (Paperback)
A fantastic read. A story of a man who lived his life
fulfilling ambitions.
I will read this book again.
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