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84 of 87 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars VOYAGER BRINGS IT ON HOME!!!
The third in a series of exceptionally well written time travel, adventure/romance books by the author, it tells a gripping and highly entertaining tale. There are five such novels published to date in what is hoped to be a series of six books. I urge the interested reader to start at the beginning and read each and every one. Do not be daunted by the length. Trust me...
Published on 17 Nov. 2002 by Lawyeraau

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Engaging but flawed
I really enjoyed the first part of this book. It had everything I wanted upon finishing Dragonfly in Amber - pain, angst and heartache, all leaving you brimming with excitement at the prospect of Claire and Jamie’s reunion.

Yet after the reunion, the whole thing falls flat. There’s a lot of focus on a lackluster plot and weird, unlikely situations...
Published 8 months ago by Alexandra


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84 of 87 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars VOYAGER BRINGS IT ON HOME!!!, 17 Nov. 2002
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Voyager: (Outlander 3) (Paperback)
The third in a series of exceptionally well written time travel, adventure/romance books by the author, it tells a gripping and highly entertaining tale. There are five such novels published to date in what is hoped to be a series of six books. I urge the interested reader to start at the beginning and read each and every one. Do not be daunted by the length. Trust me when I say that you will wish that they were longer, so riveting a story does the author unfold. A masterful storyteller, the author employs the superlative use of historical events and period detail to weave an engaging three dimensional tapestry of timeless love and adventure. While the core of the story is about a love that transcends time, it is, however, much more than that. It is an adventure story that grips the reader from beginning to end and is positively addictive!
The love that spans time is that which twentieth century Englishwoman, Claire Randall, has for eighteenth century Scottish highlands warrior, James Fraser. Those readers who have read the first book in the series, "Outlander", know that in 1945, Claire, a combat nurse during World War II, is reunited with her husband, Frank, after the war. While on a second honeymoon in Scotland, she visits a strange, flat topped hill, where a forbidding stone circle draws her. Touching one of the stones, she is hurled through a vortex in time and finds herself in eighteenth century Scotland, where she meets a brave and brawny, red headed Scot, James Fraser, with whom she falls head over heels in love. Finding herself thrust into the midst of clan warfare and intrigue, she and her beloved 'Jamie' have enough adventures to last a lifetime.
The second book, "Dragonfly in Amber", is a continuation of that story, told from the perspective of the twentieth century where Claire, now a doctor, has lived for the past twenty years. Upon the death of her twentieth century husband, Frank, Claire returns to Scotland with her grown, red headed daughter, Brianna. There, she discloses to Brianna the events of her secret past, as well as the truth of who Brianna's biological father truly is and of the love that Claire bore him.
While in Scotland, however, Claire discovers something that will forever change her future, as well as her past. You see, for the past twenty years, Claire has mistakenly believed that her beloved 'Jamie' died in the historic battle of Culloden. It was there that the Scottish highlanders bravely fought the English in a misguided attempt to restore Charles Stuart, their bonnie Prince Charlie, to the throne of England, only to be decimated on the battlefield. Those few who survived were branded as Jacobite traitors and imprisoned, and their families disenfranchised. It is this very event that Claire and 'Jamie' had conspired to change, only to fail.
Their story transports the reader from the turmoil of the Scottish highlands to the intrigue of the French Court and regales the reader with the adventures of the two lovers, as they conspire to change the very course of history. It was this valiant attempt that ultimately brought Claire and 'Jamie' to the crossroad that would compel them to part and have Brianna become a denizen of the twentieth century.
In "Voyager", Claire, now realizing that the love of her life and soulmate survived the battle of Culloden, makes the decision to go back in time and find James Fraser, as for the past twenty years her love for him has remained constant. Leaving her daughter, Brianna, she once more hurls herself into the vortex of time to eighteenth century Scotland to begin her search for James Fraser, in hope of being reunited with her 'Jamie'.
This book tells the story of what happened to Claire Randall and James Fraser in those intervening twenty years. It tells of their ultimate reunion and rediscovery. With historical events as a backdrop and an unforgettable cast of characters, it regales the reader with their new adventures, as Claire returns to a still divided, turmoil ridden Scotland. Reunited with James Fraser, none the worse for wear, they seek to make a life for themselves. As their love comes full circle, they take to the high seas, and their adventures continue. This compelling time travel saga is sure to captivate the reader.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great, 15 Dec. 2007
This review is from: Voyager: (Outlander 3) (Paperback)
I was fortunate when I first started reading Diana Gabaldon's intriguing series; fortunate, I say, because the first three books were already available, so I didn't suffer quite so terribly from Claire and Jamie withdrawal. From the moment I picked up "Outlander" I knew that I was reading what perhaps in time will (and should) become the standard for romance, although it is erroneous to categorize Gabaldon's works as simply being "romance". The ongoing saga of the Frasers is enjoyable regardless of what genre you prefer. Diana is just that good. But I digress...
In the third installment of the series, Doctor Claire Randall is vacationing in 1968 Scotland when she discovers that her husband, Jamie Fraser, who she thought was killed during the battle of Culloden, has in fact survived and is alive and well...in 1765. With the aid of their daughter, Brianna, and young historian Roger Wakefield, Claire arranges for the most difficult--and the most rewarding--undertaking of her life: reuniting with Jamie after twenty years of separation.

Full of surprising twists as well as the emotional depth and historical accuracy one has come to expect from Diana Gabaldon, "Voyager" is a novel that stands on its own, which is how a good novel is written, whether or not it is part of a series!!! And if you missed Tino Georgiou's--The Fates--I strongly recommend reading it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Engaging but flawed, 1 Sept. 2014
By 
Alexandra (Manchester, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Voyager: (Outlander 3) (Paperback)
I really enjoyed the first part of this book. It had everything I wanted upon finishing Dragonfly in Amber - pain, angst and heartache, all leaving you brimming with excitement at the prospect of Claire and Jamie’s reunion.

Yet after the reunion, the whole thing falls flat. There’s a lot of focus on a lackluster plot and weird, unlikely situations. I know the novel is based on time travel which is of course weird and unlikely, but the previous books have always had a certain sense of being grounded in reality. Now they seem to be running around a ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ movie and encountering voodoo magic and men with crocodile heads. There are a few new dodgy characters introduced – Mr Willoughby, a racially stereotyped Chinese male, is the Jar Jar Binks of the outlander series and I’m still not really sure what the point of him was.

My biggest problem with the book is that after all the character exploration and development of the first half, there’s no emotional pay off during the second. A lot has obviously changed but it’s frustratingly never really dealt with. When Claire discovers one of Jaime’s secrets while they’re at Lallybroch (a secret which he has actively worked to deceive her of by sending prior word to make sure nobody mentions it), it’s only a matter of pages before all is forgiven. I just get the impression that Claire feels Jamie is so perfect and loves her so much that it doesn’t matter what he’s done. A bit more anger and resentment would have been much more riveting and realistic than quiet acceptance that always seems to end with her cradling his head in her lap.

Despite the problems, I didn’t sleep much until I’d finished the book. This series is definitely addicting and engrossing; characterisation has always been a huge strength of these books and I’m sure I’ll give the next novel a shot to find out what happens to everyone.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Diana Does It Again!, 18 Oct. 2004
By 
Kathy Lewis (Maine, United States of America) - See all my reviews
The 3rd in the series, and still I can't get enough! My heart beat with Claire's as she's walking into Carfax Close, my tears fall with hers and Jamie's as they look-together-at Bree's pictures, my heart and my body ache as they reunite... and as much as 20 years can change a person, it seems at least for these 2 characters, they are still the same. I cried tears of joy when Fergus drops to his knees, and she realizes who it is, and how , even though he's 20 years older, he is still the same to her. Travel, more adventure than I thought possible, Great Joy and Deep Sadness... what can I say? Diana, you did it again! A definite must have for Gabaldon fans. Thanks for letting me share my opinion.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Even better but more difficult read that its predecessors, 22 Sept. 2014
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I started this book the moment I finished book two, and until about two-thirds of the way through it, I felt quite obsessed with it, remaining n one of those odd "thinking about the book in every waking moment and then dreaming about it" moods that I find my favourite books always give me.

The first third of this novel has a far more complex structure than its predecessors. The chapters alternate between the 1960s, as Claire, Brianna, and Roger try to find out what happened to Jamie after he seemingly survived Culloden; flashbacks to Claire's life over the last twenty years; and chapters from Jamie's life over the same period of time, two hundred years in the past.

I love time-travel stories when they make your head spin, and this achieved it in a way that earlier books in the series didn't quite manage. I loved having the researchers in 1968 find something out about Jamie's life from a dry document, then getting to see the emotional reality of it through his eyes. This is particularly strong where things have passed into folklore. I'm always fascinated bye the idea of the difference between historical myth and reality, and there are some wonderful examples of it here: prepare to laugh at the story of how the place called Leap o'the Cask got it's name - and then to cry at the brutal reality.

I definitely saw the first book and to a lesser extent the second book as being primarily romance novels, even though many fans tend to argue against this. In this instalment, however, I felt that while the romance between Claire and Jamie was still the heart and soul of the book, the genres were genuinely much more blurred. It's certainly a brave romance novelist that keeps her lovers completely and utterly apart for the first third of a thousand page novel.

It's worth pointing out that while the 1968 scenes are a bit lighter, most of this first third is horribly depressing. Jamie's section opens with him living in a cave, and things rarely improve. There's no one scene as horrific as the ending of the first book, but he does have to live with a relentless, soul-sapping grimness. Claire isn't living in a cave in her flashbacks. She's living in a nice house in Boston, with her dream job as a doctor and her beloved daughter. And yet her guilt at leaving, her trauma over Culloden and her inability to either properly restart or fully break off her marriage to Frank means that it doesn't make for much happier reading. And running between both threads is an utter longing for each other, even though Claire is sure that Jamie is dead and he's convinced he's never going to see her again. The author somehow makes this more poignant, and yes, romantic, then many authors manage to make scenes of characters getting steamy together. It's lovely, it's tragic, and any reader is going to be dying for them to get back together, and maybe get a break.

I hate spoilers, but considering that this is an eight book series, I don't think I'm really giving much away to say that eventually, the longed-for reunion does occur. I felt it was perfect - moving and delightful and heartwarming, without skirting around the reality that two people can't just come back together after twenty years apart and expect nothing to have changed.

There's wonderful emotional drama in the immediate aftermath of the reunion but frankly, once it had been more or less resolved, I think the book should have ended. The plot of the final third of the book centres on a trip to the West Indies and pirates and slavery. It's perfectly fun and exciting and its nice to see Jamie and Claire rebuilding their life together, but it just didn't have quite the emotional or literary impact of the rest of the novel. It didn't affect me enough to make me lost interest or to mark the book down, but I don't think it added much.

Most of the things that bothered me about books one and two were gone, or at least substantially improved. There's much less rape and attempted rape, and only one (fairly half-hearted) flogging. The lurching from one disaster to the next aspect was played down in the first half, though did come back with a vengeance once the characters hit the high seas. I'm starting to think that the main characters are simultaneously cursed to have the worst possible things happen to them at all times, and blessed to somehow get through them without dying or permanently losing each other.

In my review of book one, I complained about the negative stereotyping of both English characters and gay characters. I'm delighted to announce that, as though to silence these complaints, this book includes a character who is English AND gay and yet utterly honourable and lovely. Lord John Grey is basically the anti-Jack Randall, and I think we can all be grateful for that.

On the other hand, I was rather upset with the treatment of the man who previously held the mantle of "only nice Englishman in the entire series." One of the real strengths of the first book was that it didn't take the easy way out and make Claire single or married to someone horrid. For me, the genuine love and affection between her and Frank permeated the 1940s opening scenes, and her initial longing to get back to him and later fond memories of him and refusal to let Jamie do anything that might risk his existence were extremely touching. Clearly, at this point, Jamie is the only man for her, but I still found it sad that her relationship with Frankp couldn't regain some of its old spark in his absence.

In addition, Frank seemed so out of character. He supported his wife going off to work as a war nurse and seemed to love her adventurous nature and upbringing and was lovely in book one. Why did he try to stop her becoming a doctor? Why did he complain when she looked a bit bedraggled? At the point when he inexplicably makes horribly racist comments, I felt that the author was just manipulating me to dislike him, and actually, it felt like a cop-out. That said, I only cared so much because of the extent to which the characters and the story had got under my skin.

Overall, this isn't an easy read, but only because the author makes you care about the characters so much before putting them through hell. If you enjoyed the first two books, you have got to read this- just try to find a quiet space where you can read for hours, and get yourself some tissues and comforting whisky!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Voyager, 31 May 2009
By 
Clare "Bookaholic" (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Voyager: (Outlander 3) (Paperback)
The third in the Outlander series and I have to say I loved Cross Stitch (or Outlander to anyone beyond the English Isles) Dragonfly in Amber was good though I didn't enjoy it as much as Cross Stitch, and Voyager? Fan-blooming-tastic! I was so hooked from the off.

For the past twenty years Claire thinks Jamie was killed at Culloden but, he never and so begins a fantastic and beautifully told story. The beginning starts with telling the story as to where Jamie is and then with Claire back in the present day and then when Claire decides to go back again it was quite magical the moment they saw each other again, if this was a film I could really imagine it (though I hope this series is never made into a film as it always ruins it for me!).

Yes its an epic of a book and isn't a quick read on a rainy afternoon but, like with the previous books it just doesn't fell like you have devoured 1000 odd pages, I definitely didn't want it to end (even though I have the next 3 books!)

I need to catch up on a few of my other books that have been waiting in the wings for far too long but, I will be back in Claire & Jamie's world very very soon!
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Far from a failure!, 10 Sept. 2001
By 
Ms. B. M. Nunn (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Voyager: (Outlander 3) (Paperback)
After a friend who has known me for many years, asked me to read Crossstitch, I bought the rest of the series that was available (she brought me the american version over), I couldnt possibly imagine that a sequel could live on its own, and as a fantastic part of a series. "Voyager" is a unique journey, a tour of times, and a lesson in love. The forthright nature of this book, teaches emotion, morals, and how to love fully.
An absolutely fantastic world, which enthrawls you, shocks you and makes you cry along with each person in the book. Jamie Fraser, I want you as my husband, Claire Fraser, I want you as my best friend, Roger, I want you to be my Son-In_law, and Brianna, the love for you spans across every page. Diana Gabaldan and absolute modern day miracle, what I wouldn't do to have half your skills!
Thankyou for bringing me to Clare's world, thank you for giving me the most enjoyable series, and most of all thank you for allowing me the chance to share this with the whole world.
A love lost and missed, takes Clare back to her love, in the 1700's Scotland, a need to be loved and be a part of his life, takes its pull, and drags Clare back. Watch as the wish to see Jamie pulls her back from 1968 to 1768 and the trials and tribulations of this time. Although part of a series, each book stands on its own as a masterpiece.
FANTASTIC!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I love this book and the series, 25 April 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Voyager: (Outlander 3) (Paperback)
I can't wait to read the next two books. I didn't think they were to my"taste" but after having been recommended by a friend, I read Cross Stitchand thereafter bought the remaining four books of the series. Yes, thereare times in the books when I feel it is bordering on some irrelevance,but the author immediately brings you back to the present with a new plottwist and you are once again hooked. I feel as though I am experiencingClaire's adventures and I am always thinking beyond the next page. Greatseries, can't wait for the sixth book!
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars an epic delight, 26 July 2004
This review is from: Voyager: (Outlander 3) (Paperback)
When I picked up this book, I was somewhat daunted by it's size-1059 pages, to be exact. However, within the first ten pages, I was totally hooked. I shan't say too much about the plot, as other reviews here have done that admirably, but it tells the story of two people from different times-twentieth century surgeon Claire, and eighteenth century Jamie, Laird of Lallybroch, against the background of the failed uprising that ended in blood and tears at Culloden.Diana Gabaldon manages to convey with both realism and sensitivity the consuming love that has shaped both their lives, through twenty years of seperation and oppression. It is not the fantasy love of mills and Boon, it is real, warts and all,with all the constraints and disappointments of real life, and so powerful that neither is complete without the other. Throughout all the twists and turns of the plot, the reader is left in no doubt of the overwhelming rightness of their being together throughout their trials and tribulations.

This is one of the most beautifully written and well researched historicals I have ever read-Diana Gabaldon is educated to Phd level, and it shows in the clear narrative,the wealth of period detail, her evocative love scenes and mastery of a complex story line. You won't, as I too often find in sloppy regencies, find Jamie saying 'gotten' or 'atop' or any of the other lapses to be found time and again in so many historical romances. Her characterisation is excellent;she manages to convey a range of complex characters with all the cultural references and the spirit of their time.This book is both a painstaking, well researched historical novel, and a wonderful, moving love story. Definitely a keeper for me.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Voyager starts brilliantly but lacks passion of Outlanders first two books, 23 Oct. 2014
By 
Laura smith "lilly36" (Falkirk, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
So since watching the first episode of the television adaptation of Outlander I have been working my way through the novels, thoroughly engrossed in the love affair between Claire and Jamie Fraser which spans 200 years thanks to a little time travelling magic.

With the wonderful cliffhanger ending of Dragonfly In Amber I knew it wouldn’t be long before I found myself drawn to book 3, Voyager. I delved in with wild abandon and the promise of another week of dramatic story lines and passionate love as Claire travels back through the stones in search of her husband Jamie.

It was a wonderful beginning to the book, told through the eyes of Claire and Jamie they tell us their stories separately of the 20 years they’ve spent apart. Jamie telling of his life as a fugitive after Cullen and Claire that of raising their daughter in 1960’S Boston. The stories are told beautifully and lead us to the point where Jamie and Claire are reunited.

Once they are reunited we have been told some of Jamie ‘ s story but Gabaldon has withheld just enough that we hold our breath with Claire waiting to find out more about the man he is and just how he comes to be in Edinburgh with several dubious careers. This part of the book was beautifully written, reminiscent of the first two books in character and with lots of familiar faces popping in to make the reader feel at home.

Our two lovers though find themselves headed toward Jamaica on board a ship, chasing a stolen treasure and Jamie ‘ s nephew who is likely to be sold as a slave. It is at this point I began to feel a little disjointed from the story, suddenly it’s all sailing talk and pirates and slave traders which feel a million miles away from the original books.

There are flashes of story brilliance but then there are also chapters which seem to be built for action but have no real input to the overall storyline. There are truly only so many times that Claire can be told by Jamie to stay put, only to find herself getting into scrapes he must rescue her from. Truly I don’t advocate the smacking he gave her in book one but if he’d kept it up her bottom would be red raw and reminiscent of his back by now.

The ending was poor for me, I didn’t love it but it has set up book 4 nicely and I do believe this book might translate really nicely onto the small screen and maybe I’ll learn to embrace it more then. For now I’m going to go and have a break from the throbbing manliness of Mr Fraser and come back anew to book 4 and life in the America’s and the promise of more land bound adventures with Jamie and Claire.
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Voyager: (Outlander 3)
Voyager: (Outlander 3) by Diana Gabaldon (Paperback - 3 Aug. 1995)
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