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4.1 out of 5 stars34
4.1 out of 5 stars
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on 13 October 2001
UG, sad, happy or funny? The beginning is fun and enjoyable but later, Ug the stone-age boy, becomes sad and depressed. He's far too ahead of his time for anyone to understand him. He thinks up all kinds of inventions that are commonly used today, for example, fire so that the food could be cooked, wooden boats and light, soft balls for tennis and football. He even thinks of making a wheel. Ug also believes in feelings and affection, like giving his mother a bunch of flowers, just because they are pretty. Sadly for Ug, she mistakes them for food and eats them!
Ug is always having good ideas but all the other stone age people, like his parents Dug and Dugs and his friend Ag, think he's mad. When he grows out of his trousers, his ambition is to have a pair of soft trousers made out of the skin of a woolly mammoth rather than wearing stone trousers, but no one knows how to make them. Ug's dad tries to be helpful but Ug's idea are too advanced.
Ug's story makes us think about how we've developed from the stone age. Raymond Briggs's includes lots of jokes about how ideas may look silly to people at one time but often happen much later on.
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on 8 November 2010
A must for any Raymond Briggs fans (or anyone with a good sense of humour), bought this for my 7 year old nephew and seems to be a winner. This book, like his others, manages to appeal to adults and children.
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on 1 February 2011
Bought this for an 8 year old boy who read it immediately and loved it. He enjoyed it more than Fungus the Bogeyman, which I was surprised at. A great book and boys seem to particularly like reading books in this comic strip style.
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on 27 March 2014
At first reading this is a children’s book all about a Stone Age boy’s longing to have things (like trousers) which aren’t made of stone. Looking deeper it actually tells you a lot about children and adults.
Ug is constantly asking questions which drives his parents mad. His questions make sense to him and to us as a reader living in the future. Ug’s parents have always known a world where everything is made of stone and cannot entertain the notion things could be different. This is a wonderful example of how a child’s mind is much more intuitive and creative than an adult’s. As grownups we are too attached to the status quo and merely dismiss children’s insights as silly.
The art is typical square panels but these are varied in size and layout according to needs of the story. There is a wonderful page where the diagonal of a hill serves as an excellent divider and cleverly stretches over two pages. Day, night, interior and exterior are handled with aplomb by using palette changes and there is a wonderful sunset too.
There is plenty of dialogue with large oversized speech bubbles. These elegantly overlap to clarify the order of speech. There are a lot of footnotes, presented with the frames, which unlike the genius of Fungus the Bogeyman aren’t actually funny. They serve merely to highlight where a modern turn of phrase is used, the origin of which is far in Ug’s future. They prove an unwelcome distraction.
This is an enjoyable read that operates on many levels.
Thumbs Up!
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on 27 March 2014
At first reading this is a children’s book all about a Stone Age boy’s longing to have things (like trousers) which aren’t made of stone. Looking deeper it actually tells you a lot about children and adults.
Ug is constantly asking questions which drives his parents mad. His questions make sense to him and to us as a reader living in the future. Ug’s parents have always known a world where everything is made of stone and cannot entertain the notion things could be different. This is a wonderful example of how a child’s mind is much more intuitive and creative than an adult’s. As grownups we are too attached to the status quo and merely dismiss children’s insights as silly.
The art is typical square panels but these are varied in size and layout according to needs of the story. There is a wonderful page where the diagonal of a hill serves as an excellent divider and cleverly stretches over two pages. Day, night, interior and exterior are handled with aplomb by using palette changes and there is a wonderful sunset too.
There is plenty of dialogue with large oversized speech bubbles. These elegantly overlap to clarify the order of speech. There are a lot of footnotes, presented with the frames, which unlike the genius of Fungus the Bogeyman aren’t actually funny. They serve merely to highlight where a modern turn of phrase is used, the origin of which is far in Ug’s future. They prove an unwelcome distraction.
This is an enjoyable read that operates on many levels.
Thumbs Up!
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on 21 May 2011
this book goes down really well with both my 5 year old and 2 year old. i wonder what the two year old actually understands, but she certainly laughs at the funny pictures! it is a lovely humorous look at the daily things we take for granted (like soft trousers). ug is determined to make life just a little more comfortable but comes up against maternal opposition who seems to think the ice age is coming any minute now and he will have to toughen up for that, as it will make the stone age look like a summer holiday! a good buy!
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on 11 October 2010
This book should appeal to all children and adults alike, who have a sense of imagination. When you read the book you will be transported into the stone age and learn lots of interesting facts, as well as laugh about the bizarre fantasy. A great read.
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on 10 October 2010
This book is excellent for young readers as, apart from the attractive drawings, it encourages a sense of curiosity and comment and shows too that you need to develop your own ideas in spite of discouragement from other people. And it's fun to read!
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on 30 May 2011
A forward thinking boy who attempts to make trousers out of soft and smooth fabric?

It is the one and only stone-aged UG. He lives in a freezing cold cave. This glorious book was written by the fabulous Raymond Briggs.

UG, with a pair of grumpy parents called Dug and Dugs, has a massive challenge ahead.

Raymond Briggs was rightly awarded the Kate Greenway award.

With his fabulous drawings he could win another award.

UG is always keen to find new ways to make life easier, and keeps on asking for things to be nice, soft and warm.

Now tough parents Dug and Dugs get as cross as they can with UG.

Finally the dad understands.

A book written in comic strip style, UG looks set to entral generations of youngsters.

Will UG ever get everything he wanted or will he not?
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on 16 March 2013
Raymond Briggs has been one of my favourites for many years. His drawings and stories combine great colour with good humour.
Just right for birthday treat.
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