Customer Reviews


13 Reviews
5 star:
 (10)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stone's Most Successful Bio
Irving Stone is not a "great" biographer. He doesn't provide copious bibliographic details or even pretend particularly to serious scholarship. But he does do his research. What Stone is is a very good storyteller. And the stories he tells, whether about Jack London, Heinrich Schleimann, Michelangelo or Freud, have always entertained and (yes) enriched me.
Van Gogh's...
Published on 1 Dec 2002 by Bruce Kendall

versus
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Third rate
I am completely baffled how anyone could consider this a good book.

Stone's writing is absolutely appalling. It sits uncomfortably as a short historical account of VVG's life attempting to disguise itself as a factual novel. Pretty much all dialogue between the characters is painfully executed, predominately used as quick links to join together the parts of...
Published on 27 Jun 2012 by C


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stone's Most Successful Bio, 1 Dec 2002
By 
Bruce Kendall "BEK" (Southern Pines, NC) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Lust for Life (Paperback)
Irving Stone is not a "great" biographer. He doesn't provide copious bibliographic details or even pretend particularly to serious scholarship. But he does do his research. What Stone is is a very good storyteller. And the stories he tells, whether about Jack London, Heinrich Schleimann, Michelangelo or Freud, have always entertained and (yes) enriched me.
Van Gogh's biography, and it's companion-piece, Dear Theo, are particularly moving accounts of that great, tragic painter. I doubt if any artist ever despaired as deeply or more profoundly than Vincent. Stone captures the pathos of Van Gogh's few moments of exhiliration, followed always by days of dissilusionment and depression. Van Gogh was the saint and prototype of all struggling artists. The penury and neglect he suffered through shouldn't have to be endured by the mangiest stray animal.
It's one of God's great ironies (Faulkner's cosmic jester?) that Van Gogh's works are bought by Japanese investors and museum collections for umptold millions, whereas their creator, having climbed down to the last rung of despair, died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.
If you enjoy this book as much as I did, read Dear Theo. It reveals the extraordinarly tender love the two Van Gogh brothers had for each other. Theo was basically Vincent's sole means of support during the artists's latter years. Unfortunately, Theo was living in boderline poverty himself, had a family, and thus couldn't give much to Vincent save for a little bit of money and a great deal of moral encouragement.
Both of these books are infinitely sad, yet the redeeming aspect is that Vincent didn't live his life in vain, as he thought, and that the body of work which has survived ( many paintings were painted over - canvas was a luxury) is a testament to his genius.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The life & work of Van Gogh, 9 July 2001
By 
Scott C. White "music_dude88" (Deeeeetroit) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Lust For Life (Paperback)
This is a good summary of the life on Vincent Van Gogh. I read this book to get some background for an upcoming vist to the Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam, and it didn't disapoint. I would say that 90% of the things that happen in the book are true, the other 10% is made up of likely to occur dialog between Van Gogh and the other characters. Irving Stone did a great job of capturing the emotions of Vincent as he slowly progressed to madness. Also, as I hoped, the story is very focused in the art and how it developed throughout his life. If you are a Van Gogh fan or looking for a good introduction to his life and work, then this book is great. I can see how it would be boring for the person with no motivation to read it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It is autibiogrpahy of Vincent van gogh., 1 Aug 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Lust for Life (Paperback)
It is a very beautiful book and how the writer has narrated the incidents are amazing beautiful. The realtionship between van gogh and his brother is brought out beautifully in this book. I have read 3 times this book and it is truely inspirational. Infact this book lead me to read all books of Irving stone. Some of which i have read more than 2 times.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just for Life, 5 May 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Lust For Life (Paperback)
I have read this book in the past and now I bought it for my husband. We both think that this is a beautifully written story. I would recommend that book to everyone who would like to know more about Vincent's Van Gogh life but also to anyone who enjoys reading a good story.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A terrific read, 12 Jun 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Lust For Life (Paperback)
This book is a must for people who feel that they are getting a bad break in life. Vincent Van Gogh was naive enough to follow the Christian ethic to the letter,which led to his demise as a priest. When he was sent to the coal mining regions of northern Europe to care for the poor and destitute, he found their poverty so acute that he just could not bear to have more then they so he lived as they did. When the church inspectors came to check up on him, they immediately fired him as not being fit to be a preacher.

So, he turned to art as a medium to worship his God. He didn't sell because he refused to paint what the public wanted. He stuck to what he saw and how he wanted to portray the world. Irving Stone paints a very clear picture in words and sustains interesting and informative text through the whole book. Reading about Van Gough is most likely the most inspiriing story you will ever encounter.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars lust for life, 23 Feb 2010
This review is from: Lust For Life (Paperback)
I am really pleased with the book. I suggest everyone to read it. I dont think it has anything in common with the film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lust for Life, 29 Nov 2009
By 
Peter Munn (Chambery, France) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Lust For Life (Paperback)
A passionate book about a passionate person! One really begins to understand Van Gogh a little. What incredible drive! I would recommend this book to anyone.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Third rate, 27 Jun 2012
This review is from: Lust For Life (Paperback)
I am completely baffled how anyone could consider this a good book.

Stone's writing is absolutely appalling. It sits uncomfortably as a short historical account of VVG's life attempting to disguise itself as a factual novel. Pretty much all dialogue between the characters is painfully executed, predominately used as quick links to join together the parts of the story, or to throw in a part of one of VVG's letters. This leads to all the characters becoming one dimensional and stereotyped, fine for the bit players, but in the case on Theo this is indefensible.

These weaknesses are obviously due to the book being based in VVG's letters, and there is nothing wrong with this. However, Stone should have either decided to read them more closely and followed the factual accounts in them, or simply used them as a loose handrail for his story. In odd, but important, places he seems to drift off the facts in order to expedite a point (such as VVG's disastrous visit to Kay's house). This bouncing between facts and fictional fabrications becomes distracting.

Stone's description of the Borinage, particularly VVG's trip down the mine, is in a noticeably different style to other parts of the book. This would just be an oddity unless you have read Emile Zola, particularly Germinal. To be very generous I would have to say Stone was paying 'homage' to Zola in this section.

This copy is poorly printed; small text changing from thin to blurred, bits of text missing and spelling mistakes (even on the first page).

I have given it two stars purely because Stone obviously did some research, and in recognition of the fact that by half way though I could not stand his writing anymore and the book had to go in the recycling bin. Reading VVG's letters is far more enjoyable and enlightening.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Good book to read, 6 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Lust For Life (Paperback)
I read this book, Irving Stone has beautifully described the painter and his environment. Once you start to read, you can't stop!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars An interesting book, 13 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Lust For Life (Paperback)
Although, as this is about Van Gogh's life, it is not a light-hearted book, I thoroughly enjoyed it. I knew nothing of Van Gogh's life prior to his becoming an artist so it was interesting to discover how he came to choose that path. I enjoy Irving Stone's books and although the dialogue is obviously imagined, it gives a good insight into the life and times of Vincent Van Gogh - and the man! The item arrived quickly, well packaged and as described. Excellent service!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Lust For Life
Lust For Life by Irving Stone (Paperback - 1 Feb 1990)
£6.29
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews