Customer Reviews


65 Reviews
5 star:
 (25)
4 star:
 (18)
3 star:
 (12)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:
 (6)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rich and compelling read - unmissable
Roth once more shows his literary skills in creating this engrossing book, so richly full of themes and subthemes that it causes the reader to pause in reflection on every page. I would rate this epic story (mirroring the ancient Greek conflicts so loved by its main character Coleman Silk) very highly and have no problem placing it in the "classic" category, a must-read...
Published on 8 Mar 2005 by A Common Reader

versus
20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Roth takes on Political Correctness but could do better
Readers like me familiar with Philip Roth's work may well feel slightly disappointed with The Human Stain. Many of the features which imparted a unique character to his earlier books- the vivid recreation of Jewish Newark or the introduction of the semi autobiographical narrator Nathan Zuckerman- are now beginning to seem rather tiring mannerisms.
Roth becomes more...
Published on 14 April 2001


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rich and compelling read - unmissable, 8 Mar 2005
By 
A Common Reader "Committed to reading" (Sussex, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Human Stain (Paperback)
Roth once more shows his literary skills in creating this engrossing book, so richly full of themes and subthemes that it causes the reader to pause in reflection on every page. I would rate this epic story (mirroring the ancient Greek conflicts so loved by its main character Coleman Silk) very highly and have no problem placing it in the "classic" category, a must-read for anyone who seeks to understand American culture in the late 20th century.
Despite the rather grandiose ambition of the book (to make a once-and-for-all comment on the whole topic of political correctness in academia), the book is immensely readable and as the story gathers pace, the reader is drawn into a narrative as thrilling and suspenseful as any crime novel (and in any case there are plenty of crimes in here anyway!). The characters are complex and the situations they find themselves in unusual. Huge conflicts emerge behind their differing approaches to life and the book is in some ways like a glorified soap opera with all the human themes one would find in any television drama.
In writing a review of this book, you become aware of quite how rich this novel is. It would be an excellent book for a reading group, or a more academic programme and the topics for discussion which arise from it would be endless. The book tells complex stories about the Vietnam experience, Bill Clinton's meanderings through the Lewinsky story, racism and ethnicity, human ageing, and the irresisitlble pull of romance and sex. Primarily, the book is about the human condition (the "human stain" of the title) and to use a cliché, man's search for meaning. But it can also be read as a powerful human drama, for Roth's fictional narrative is as valid on its own terms as the lessons he seeks to draw from it.
This is a rich and compelling read, highly recommended to anyone who expects their chosen books to make them think about their own lives and the lives of those around them.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Roth takes on Political Correctness but could do better, 14 April 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Human Stain (Paperback)
Readers like me familiar with Philip Roth's work may well feel slightly disappointed with The Human Stain. Many of the features which imparted a unique character to his earlier books- the vivid recreation of Jewish Newark or the introduction of the semi autobiographical narrator Nathan Zuckerman- are now beginning to seem rather tiring mannerisms.
Roth becomes more ambitious with every book and The Human Stain again sees him tackling through a piquant life story The State of the Nation. Here he is taking on the tyranny of political correctness and of the persecuting spirit which is said to be ruling America at the time of the Monica Lewinsky trial.
Some of Roth's hits at the intellectual decline of American universities or the absurdities of French theory are shrewd. But they are also often disconnected from the vital life of the novel and read more like impassioned (and not always well thought through) journalistic tirades.
'Write what you know' is a saying that Roth always seems to have respected in his earlier work, with its accounts of the life of the novelist and the pains and pleasures of an American Jewish upbringing. But it is one he seems to depart from here. His central character Coleman Silk is marvellously alive, but many of the supporting figures- like the neurotic Derrida spouting academic or the mad Vietnam veteran- feel like a clever assemblage of cliches rather than authentic creations.
For me at least if Roth is becoming ever more concerned with 'issues'- wrestling with Black History month or the Monica Lewinsky trial- then the cost is a slackening delight in language. The monologues here lack some of the high octane inventiveness of previous works and Roth's bent for exaggeration looks less like surrealism or fantasy than lack of attention to the facts.
Having said all that there is still much to admire here and a fantastic plot twist which generates an extremely intelligent discussion of what personal identity means in modern America. Buy by all means but preferably with some earlier Roth for comparison.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Unknowable and Elusive Truth, 19 Dec 2002
This review is from: The Human Stain (Paperback)
The Human Stain completes Philip Roth's thematic American trilogy, a meditation on the historical forces in the latter half of the twentieth century that have destroyed many innocent lives. In this trilogy, Roth takes devastating aim at the "American dream" and its empty promises of prosperity, freedom and everlasting happiness.
The trilogy began with American Pastoral, which some believe to be the high point in Roth's career. American Pastoral explored the effects of late-sixties radicalism on the idyllic life of Swede Levov and his family. I Married a Communist, the second book of the trilogy, was somewhat of a disappointment after the near-perfect American Pastoral, but it was still an engrossing story about the McCarthy era, a portrait of a country in which paranoia had displaced reason, allowing rumor and innuendo to run rampant and ruin lives.
The Human Stain closes the trilogy and brings us to the year 1998. The United States is awash in the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal and citizens feel the "ecstasy of sanctimony;" they are ready to accuse, blame and punish a very good president for what amounts to nothing more than the sexual peccadilloes almost every person becomes involved in at some time during his life.
On its surface, The Human Stain condemns the political correctness of McCarthyism that effectively turns college campuses away from creative thought and toward middle-aged, white, male oppression at any cost. Does this make The Human Stain a campus satire? Yes, but it is so much more and those who think it is not are simply missing the book's deepest level. It is, at its heart, a sad and poignant statement on the very essence of human nature, a statement that, in Roth's talented hands, becomes utterly convincing. It reminds us of our very unpraiseworthy proclivity to condemn, sully and even find some secret and voluptuous joy in ruining the name of others and delivering their lives into the hands of misery. The real truth, Roth tells us, is both "endless" and unknowable, no matter how much we may wish to label it with our petty accusations. Most of us, however, find this unknowability unacceptable, and so, we leave our own unmistakable "human stain" in our wake.
Coleman Silk, Roth's protagonist in The Human Stain, understands truth's unknowablility all too well. This seventy-one year old professor, who was once a beloved classicist of Athena College, now faces a scandal much like the one faced by President Clinton. And, like Clinton, Silk has done a very good job; his efforts as dean have left their mark of excellence. Athena College is all the better for his having been there, just as the United States is all the better for the Clinton years. Nevertheless, Silk finds himself accused of being both a racist and a misogynist.
Shamed publicly, Silk does exact revenge, but revenge for what? What exactly is the truth in this matter? While those in Silk's community want to see "truth" as a matter of black and white, the novel's narrator, Nathan Zuckerman tells us that "truth," at least in this case, if not in every case, is something that is more nuanced, more grey. And, in a delightfully ironic twist, we learn that Silk has a secret to share, one that makes his accusers turn beet-red with embarrassment rather than with exhilaration.
Nathan Zuckerman, Roth's own alter-ego, has appeared in eight of his novels, including the first two of this trilogy. He is the man in whom the reader must place his trust, or his mistrust. Zuckerman willingly admits that he knows only certain facts about his protagonists, that he must rely on his own innate gift for storytelling to convince us of the things that he, himself, sees so clearly, and that we are certainly free to accept or deny his version as we will.
Roth could have chosen to tell his story from the vantage point of an objective, omniscient narrator and thus allowed us access to the thoughts and feelings of all the characters involved. At first glance, this might seem to have been the wiser choice. A second glance, however, will show us it would have been a travesty, an audacious claim to actually know what the elusive and unknowable truth really is. Telling the story from the point-of-view of the highly subjective Zuckerman is tantamount to an admission of the elusiveness of truth; it is allowing us to form our own opinions without manipulation from either the author or from any of his characters. It is, genius.
If there is any blemish, however slight, in this wonderful literary achievement, it is the character of Les Farley. Les is the now-cliched Vietnam veteran; a man suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, the weary, misunderstood and maligned soldier who has been abandoned by a country for whom he was willing to give up his very life. Roth uses Farley as a plot device only, and he is one that fails to convince in an otherwise overwhelmingly convincing book.
Roth's prose is, as always, without rival. His Jamesian sentences twist and turn with a vitality and energy that, at times, can seem almost frantic. But Roth never jeopardizes his lucidity; he is a linguistic master who can take us on the most tumultuous ride with an ease and smoothness that other authors can only dream about.
The Human Stain is Philip Roth at the top of his form. It is also American fiction at its very finest and a book that is definitely not to be missed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great writing tainted by the human stain of wish fulfilment, 19 Aug 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Human Stain (Hardcover)
Yes, this is a very well-written and absorbing book, and it deserves the good reviews that it has received. Coleman Silk's situation is presented in a sympathetic way, and the role that identity politics can play in the assassination of individuality is wryly illustrated.
Phillip Roth's characters are often drawn more as archetypes (although some might say stereotypes) than anything else, so the embittered Vietnam vet and the screwed-up continental feminist, to name but two examples, are convincing as broad types whose particular psychoses we all recognise.
I have no problem with the fact that the main narrator and Coleman are both old men, and that one of them has succeeded in seducing a woman half his age. But I feel that credibility is rather stretched by the introduction of another woman, still in her twenties, having a secret obsession with good old Coleman as well. At one point Faunia tells the seventy-one-year-old Coleman that he is too young for her and that she needs a man of ninety in a wheelchair. I am afraid that this has more to do with the author fantasising about his own future. Both the important women in this book are under middle age, and they both go for much older men? Hmmm. The only important old female character is Coleman's wife, but she's dead from the beginning of the novel, and therefore a voice from the past. In reality women usually outlive men, but I get a horrible feeling that Mr Roth doesn't like them hanging on past their sell-by date....
This novel, while admirably depicting one man's struggle for individuality, presents female characters who wish to be controlled by much older men; a bit too much authorial recommendation, I feel.
Most of the people I know who read Phillip Roth are male, and many of them believe that "political correctness" has gone too far. Although I understand their concern, I think they may sometimes be in danger of replacing one ideology with another. It was somewhat hard for me to read this novel as a young woman, not because I disliked the female characters, but because I couldn't relate to them, nor do I know any women who resemble them. There was that Anne Nicole Smith, but her old thing was a billionaire.....
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


36 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Roth's finest work, 14 July 2004
By 
Joe Sherry (Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Human Stain (Paperback)
This book sat on my bookshelf for over a year before I decided to pick it up and read it. I had only read Roth's Portnoy's Complaint and wasn't too impressed with it. But, when I found out that there was a movie adaptation of the book I wanted to make sure that I read the book before seeing the movie (books are typically far superior to the film adaptation). It didn't take long before I was floored. The Human Stain is an exceptional novel and has completely turned around my opinion of Philip Roth. Without question this is one of the best novels I have read this year.
The Human Stain is the story of Coleman Silk, a retired college professor from Athena College. Coleman retired from his position in the midst of a scandal. He was accused of making a racist remark in one of his classes towards two students. The accusation is patently untrue but Coleman was not the most popular man on campus and things began to steamroll out of control until he left the school. The joke inherent in this accusation is that while Coleman may look like a 71 year old white man, he is actually a black man. Coleman has spent his professional (and private) life denying who (and what) he is. In case this concept sounds too fantastic (a black man who looks white trying to hide the fact that he is black), there is a real life corollary in Anatole Broyard, a New York Times book critic.
This is the Coleman that we are first introduced to. He is in a sexual (and not much more) relationship with 34 year old Faunia Farley. She is illiterate and works as a cleaning lady at Athena College. This too, is a scandal waiting to happen. It is this relationship with Faunia that instigates the telling of the story and we are told very early in the novel that Coleman and Faunia do not live for many more months (by early, I mean within 20 pages). The story is told by writer Nathan Zuckerman. Zuckerman was told most of what he knows by Coleman. For quite some time Coleman tried to get Zuckerman to write a book about the events following the alleged racist remark. The Human Stain (the title of Roth's novel as well as Zuckerman's book) is not quite the book that Coleman wanted written, but it was a story that Zuckerman felt compelled to tell. We must remember that everything is shaded by what Zuckerman knows and what he believes.
There is a long section in the middle of the book dealing with a young Coleman Silk. We see him in High School and get glimpses of how he became a black man hiding behind his white skin and denying his family and why he would have done such a thing. This section deals with Coleman being a young boxer and the relationships with women that he engaged in. For all the power of this book, the section on the young Coleman is the most powerful. I first expected it to break the rhythm of the story, but it fits perfectly and is one of the best passages in the novel.
After being somewhat put off Roth from reading Portnoy's Complaint, this book impressed me so much I'm looking forward to reading American Pastoral. I have a hard time imagining that Roth wrote a better book than The Human Stain, but a different novel won the Pulitzer. Awards aside, The Human Stain is one of the best books I have read all year and is simply exceptional work. After finishing the book, the best I can say is: wow. The book really is that good. I would highly recommend The Human Stain.
-Joe Sherry
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The "provincial poisons" of modern life..., 9 May 2009
By 
LittleMoon (loving my life in the rain) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Human Stain (Paperback)
Having won all four of America's major literary awards in succession in the 1990s (the National Book Critics Circle Award; the PEN/Faulkner Award; the National Book Award and the Pulitzer) Philip Roth hardly seems in need of another favourable book review, still...

With The Human Stain, Roth introduces us to the main protagonist Coleman Silk, a 71 year old classics Professor so incensed with a false accusation of racism, that he turns to reclusive writer Nathan Zuckerman (Roth's fictional alter ego) to clear his name through writing a book. As far as plot goes, this is it. The novel unfolds as Zuckerman finds out more and more information about Silk's life, a life that has at once embraced and subverted "normality": the "real truth" if indeed it is the "truth" that Zuckerman unveils, is one of the story's great ironies.

Roth's novel is steeped in the politics of its time,1998, and even non-American readers can remember the single biggest moment in Bill Clinton's presidency: his impeachment over the incident with Monica Lewinsky. The incident in itself, and "America's" reaction to it, being one of the many, many sub-themes in this work. These sub-themes are not incidental; they are complicit in shaping Silk's life and Roth writes of the kind of twisted syllogisms: "No motive for the perpetrator is necessary, no logic or rationale is required. Only a label is required. The label is the motive. The label is the evidence. The label is the logic." that once found their social expression through McCarthyism, and lists the deadly "provincial poisons" of "gossip... jealousy... acrimony... boredom... lies" of the small-town mentality (suggestive of a national phenomenon?) whereby reason and truth are quickly forgotten in the face of scandal. Ultimately, this is not only how Silk's carefully constructed life, comes apart, but why it was built in the first place.

It would be unfair not to comment on Roth's brilliant prose, which flows in great long luscious sentences, but without being convoluted. It would also be unfair not to mention the couple of amazing monologues, and various descriptive passages throughout which are exquisitely conceived. It would also be unwise not to mention that if there is a flaw in this novel, might it be that some of the characters seem to be rather too obvious mouthpieces for Roth's own views? Or is this jumping to conclusions?

Regardless, this is literary fiction of the finest calibre: a novel that is a beautifully written, richly textured and readable story of the life of Coleman Silk, and inseparable from it, is an eminently humane, darkly humorous and occasionally frightening commentary on the realities of modern life.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Human Stain, 12 May 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: The Human Stain (Paperback)
The Human Stain is not a book I would have been immediately drawn to yet was more than pleasantly surprised when I began reading it. Initally the many tangents Roth incoporates into the plot were infuriating, and of little relevence when trying to learn more about the essential plot of the novel. Yet these passages are some of best written passages in the book. They add an invaluable insight into the human mind and increase our understanding of the characters. On a second reading I was able to appriciate their significance more fully and enjoy the impact they added to the book. I would advise anyone with the time to re-read this book if at first it seems impossible to appreciate - it certainly grows on you. Roth concentrates on the ironies of American life and morals and the complexity of the human race. This is a very deep novel which is able to make you question the complex nature of purity.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HUMANS - we can't help it., 22 Feb 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Human Stain (Hardcover)
The story in this book is masterfully controlled, has wit, insight, description, plot movement, sex, disgrace, intellectualism - all things to be found in any novel by Philip Roth, and in life. I am a fan of this book and believe everyone should read it. Yes, because I like a good yarn and colourful characters (meant in the innocent sense, of course), but mostly because of Mr Roth's message which is both yelled at us by his red-faced raving puppet Coleman Silk, and underpinning almost everything in the book.
The creed is a deep but gentle one: we are fallible beings and any one of us cannot be another person or know them exactly. Even the tiniest assumption of knowledge creates a falsity that has far-reaching consequences. Because of this, Roth doesn't delight us by inventing stainless heroes, innocent victims and dastardly villains of the piece, but instead presents us with living people as we would meet them in the street. Then they are shown to us through each other's eyes, through their own eyes, and through the narrator's. Are we any closer to seeing the full picture? It is dangerous to go about in life dismissing the Delphine Roux's that we meet as mad cows, the Professor Silk's as snobs or dirty old men, or the Faunia Farley's as screwed up tarts.
If you think that a book without gloriously and hopelessly fictitious heroes and villains is not for you, please think again. If the diverse settings, surreal situations, social comment and searing cynicism don't get you going, the prose, the beautiful prose will. Philip Roth's writing is, to me, a substance in itself - no matter the meaning of the words, the language he chooses and the way he moulds it to his designs make reading it a pleasurable and addictive experience. He can make you read about any subject he wants, no matter how disagreeable, unpleasant or, most usually, uncomfortably close to home the subject. There's a line in a Squeeze song that goes "Beat me up with your letters..." - Philip Roth does that.
Managed to get to the end of this spiel as well as all the other reviews? Still want to know more? I can only suggest what I imagine the writer of The Human Stain would: find out for yourself.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A primer for the soul, 22 Nov 2007
By 
M. Harrison "Hamish" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Human Stain (Paperback)
I've long since learned to be sceptical of the hyberbolic quotes that decorate the covers of books. So when I read the Sunday Telegraph's summary of The Human Stain as 'The work of a genius at full throttle' I anticipated disappointment. But within only a few pages their assessment became a statement of fact rather than opinion.

It would have been absurd for Roth to call his novel 'The Human Condition', and yet he reasonably could have. In these three hundred and fifty or so pages he describes with cruel precision the human need to tell stories and lies about ourselves and each other - stories and lies which together ensure that all human interaction is at cross purposes. 'Intention? Motive? Consequence? Meaning?' he writes. 'All that we don't know is astonishing. Even more astonishing is what passes for knowing.'

Through the story of Coleman Silk, a man whose anger at being wronged is amplified to the point of near madness by the knowledge of his own secret wrongs, Roth shines a bitterly bright spotlight on the assumptions we make about others, and on the assumptions we try to make others have of us. The Human Stain is a tragedy of epic proportions - with all the pain, irony, misunderstanding and revelation that suggests. The twists of the plot are like the twists of the knife as he skewers human frailty, prejudice and self-deception.

I read this book very slowly - not because it is hard work (it is in fact an electrifying page-turner) - but because the brilliance of the prose and the richness of the insight makes it sometimes feel like a primer for the soul - and to miss a sentence might be to miss an insight one should never forget. So, for example, buried deep mid-paragraph, in the middle of the book, Roth almost casually encapsulates the thesis of the novel: '...we leave a stain, we leave a trail, we leave our imprint. Impurity, cruelty, abuse, error, excrement, semen - there's no other way to be here. Nothing to do with disobedience. Nothing to do with grace or salvation or redemption. It's in everyone. Indwelling. Inherent. Defining. The stain that is there before its mark.'

Lately I have felt weary of the over conceptualised and plodding earnestness of so much contemporary literary fiction, and this book singlehandedly made me fall in love again with the act and purpose of reading. It is a book that makes you want to gasp at the beauty of language in the hands of a master-craftsman, and that leaves you feeling wiser about yourself, and everyone else - even if that wisdom is deep, dark and desperate.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Human Stain, 28 May 2012
By 
This review is from: The Human Stain (Paperback)
When a writer's career spans 7 decades (Roth's Goodbye Columbus was published in 1959), how do you rate any one of their novels? Well, the short answer is "With great difficulty". None of those novels exist in a vacuum. Okay, maybe, just maybe, you can come to one of Roth's novels completely unaware of his other work, but it's unlikely.

With this in mind, I found it hard reading 'The Human Stain' without holding it up against the novel I believe to be his masterpiece - the Pulitzer-winning 'American Pastoral'. Hard because - like 'Pastoral' - 'The Human Stain' is narrated by Roth's alter-ego Nathan Zuckerman. Hard because it was published only 3 years later, and - along with 'I Married A Communist' - forms part of a loose trilogy of novels, each exploring a different central, male character as observed and understood by Zuckerman.

In both novels the central character - Coleman Silk in 'Stain', Swede Levov in 'Pastoral' - remains something of an enigma, even when the dust has settled and the narrative is done, but in 'Pastoral' we are left with a more complete but at the same time more nuanced portrait, both familiar and unknowable. With Coleman Silk, Roth is on less sure ground. As goyish as Swede Levov may have looked, he was still Jewish. Coleman Silk merely pretends to be, and Roth's empathy with his African American characters is, at times, a little strained. For example, when Silk's sister complains about Black History Month, is that the authentic voice of an African American woman in her 70s, or rather a white Jewish man in his 70s?

Leaving comparisons with 'American Pastoral' aside, the novel still loses a fifth star through its never entirely convincing portrayal of Silk's lover, the apparently illiterate Faunia. While some of her inconsistencies (her wildly imaginative vocabulary) are eventually explained, her dialogue all too often feels masculine. Again, it's hard not to think this is a man in his 70s speaking, rather than a woman half that age. If anything, the novel's strongest and - obliquely - most sympathetic characters are probably Lester Farley and Delphine Roux.

Okay, granted, books and films have had enough troubled 'Nam vets to last us several lifetimes over, but Lester's voice, his interior monologue, is one of Roth's finest and most convincing, not to mention his most disturbing. With Delphine, Roth starts well - she's a far more believable character than Faunia - but things go a little downhill later in the book, with a revelation that once again has the author's fingerprints all over it. And am I alone in thinking he's named Delphine - one of the novel's most destructive forces - after the notorious 19th Century New Orleans torturer?

Having said all this, the last 100 pages are utterly gripping, and the final scene is beautifully ambiguous, troubling, and about as cinematic as anything Roth has ever written. Not his best novel, but then (the decidedly dodgy 'The Humbling' aside) even on a bad day Roth knocks most of the competition right out of the ring.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Human Stain
The Human Stain by Philip Roth (Paperback - 5 April 2001)
6.29
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews